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Military Nursing

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My name is Nick, and I am a prior service Marine. I am currently in an Accelerated BSN program, I graduate in August 2017. I still want to serve in the military but my MOS as an Anti-Tank Missileman, 0352, does not coordinate with my nursing degree. I also have an Associate of Arts and a Bachelor of Science in Organizational Supervision. I know there is other threads on this topic but most seem to be out dated and not many pertain to prior service.

I have been in contact with a recruiter and he has been very helpful. I just want to here more it from a person who has actually been in my position. I do not plan on doing any type of Nursing Transition program I want to see the civilian side of healthcare before active duty military. I still want to serve but other reasons is for continued education and loan repayment would be nice. Deployments do not bother and most likely would welcome a few. I feel its easiest to just list a few of my questions rather than type in other information.[/COLOR][/font]

1. Ive heard that most first duty stations are not overseas, is this still true?

2. What is a daily week like for a nurse?

3. What are opportunities for educational repay as well as future education and bonuses? Read that will only get one as it cancels out others.

4. Which branch is best for nurses in your opinion and why?

5. When looking for jobs in the civilian side what would be the best field to get in to help support my military career? (I enjoy all fields in their own aspects)

That is all i have for now thanks everyone!

Did you talk to an AMEDD recruiter? I know you said a recruiter but an AMEDD recruiter would have answered all the questions you asked. I'm prior service as well (Army) but I'm only know interested in the Reserve component. So I have contacted all branches so I can compare across the board so I can get a general sense of what I'm going to do next.

Yes I have spoke with the Air Force AMEDD recruiter, he has answered the questions but being prior service I am very skeptical of what is said. I was just looking more for the opinions of people who have been through it. Army said that most come from the academy and I've tried to reach the Navy but have been unable to reach.

Pixie.RN, MSN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN. Has 12 years experience.

Army said that most come from the academy

Academy? There is no academy for Army nurses. lol. Officers in general from the academy, sure; nurses, not so much.

Sorry ROTC maybe? The recruiter told me they do not take many nurses from outside and told me to go reserves.

Pixie.RN, MSN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN. Has 12 years experience.

Sorry ROTC maybe? The recruiter told me they do not take many nurses from outside and told me to go reserves.

Yes, ROTC makes more sense. They do accept some experienced nurses (usually specialty like ER or ICU) via direct commission — I was one of them. It's based on the needs of the Army at the time, and they currently don't have a lot of needs. If you go Reserves, there is no guaranteed transition to active duty at all. I believe AF and Navy still take new grads.

PK_ICU RN

Specializes in Cath lab, ICU. Has 10 years experience.

Speaking from a civilian nurse, the first thing you need to do is get your feet in the door then you can transfer to other departments if there's an opening. By the sound if it, it is easier for nurses in the civilian sector to change department in comparison to the military. In the hospital, you can apply for a different position after 6 months or a year depending on your hospital. So, if you get hired on the med/surg unit and want to do ICU or ER, you can apply for the position in 6 months to a year. The hospitals have tuition reimbursement and some offer free classes such as ACLS and other classes. Also, Kaiser and Sutter have residency program. You might wanna check it out.

When you say Kaiser and Sutter have a residency program, what do you mean by that?

Pixie.RN, MSN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN. Has 12 years experience.

When you say Kaiser and Sutter have a residency program, what do you mean by that?

Residency programs are for new grads to provide them with a very thorough orientation. Our hospital system has them — new grads spend a certain number of weeks in the classroom learning various common items such as the computer system, pumps and other equipment, IV starts, crash cart set-up and use, sim labs with codes, etc., and then they go to their various assigned units for a number of weeks for orientation. Just Google for more information.

You might have an easier time going Navy. You might find an easier translation of your service. I'm not taking about related to your MOS necessarily. More like awards and time. The Navy also has a DCO program for medical personnel. Go reserve and you can get your military nurse experience while you work on going active.

ashixes

Specializes in Emergency. Has 3 years experience.

My name is Nick, and I am a prior service Marine. I am currently in an Accelerated BSN program, I graduate in August 2017. I still want to serve in the military but my MOS as an Anti-Tank Missileman, 0352, does not coordinate with my nursing degree. I also have an Associate of Arts and a Bachelor of Science in Organizational Supervision. I know there is other threads on this topic but most seem to be out dated and not many pertain to prior service.

I have been in contact with a recruiter and he has been very helpful. I just want to here more it from a person who has actually been in my position. I do not plan on doing any type of Nursing Transition program I want to see the civilian side of healthcare before active duty military. I still want to serve but other reasons is for continued education and loan repayment would be nice. Deployments do not bother and most likely would welcome a few. I feel its easiest to just list a few of my questions rather than type in other information.[/COLOR][/font]

1. Ive heard that most first duty stations are not overseas, is this still true?

2. What is a daily week like for a nurse?

3. What are opportunities for educational repay as well as future education and bonuses? Read that will only get one as it cancels out others.

4. Which branch is best for nurses in your opinion and why?

5. When looking for jobs in the civilian side what would be the best field to get in to help support my military career? (I enjoy all fields in their own aspects)

That is all i have for now thanks everyone!

1. I've heard that usually the assignments are stateside but on my dreamsheet I listed that I didn't prefer stateside over overseas so we'll see what happens. A friend of mine who got in is going to Ohio (Air Force).

2. A daily week for most nurses is still more than likely going to be 12 hour shifts, 3 days (or nights) a week. When I had my Col nurse interview she said the ER and most nurses do 12s, but if you are in certain specialties, it may be a Monday through Friday job.

3. Not sure.

4. I have a friends doing Army and Air Force reserves nursing and I have a friend who just got into the Air Force active duty. Can't say one's better than the other from their experiences so far. I was between Air Force and the Navy. I thought about the Navy since I've had family/friends in the Marines and Navy is the medical for Marines. I asked some Navy medics that were training at my hospital which branch I should apply for and one of them said, "Do you really want to be stuck on a ship with a bunch of seamen?" Haha. Anyways I chose Air Force since I liked their bases, can assume I won't be on a ship, and have heard the lifestyle is better and they treat you better.

5. The Air Force starts new grads out on med surg, I believe, before they can specialize. I'd say ER/ICU/OR are the most in demand. Right now the AF isn't giving bonuses to ER but they are for OR is what I was told.