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some-RN 473 Views

Joined: Aug 23, '06; Posts: 3 (33% Liked) ; Likes: 8

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  • Feb 3

    I had a similar experience for my first nursing job. After 'resigning' from a small-town hospital (I was not from the small town), I took a job as a private duty RN for a quadriplegic for about 3 months in the same small town. The beauty of private duty night shift is they train you how to take care of the ONE PATIENT and SAME PATIENT every night. I put a lot of skills under my belt and on my resume from this experience (tube-feedings, vent care, etc.............). The skills from this job allowed me to apply for another New Nurse orientation at another hospital in a big town where they were more willing to actually train (& mentor) the new nurses. What you need to know is two things:
    1) Apply within the first year for another orientation as you are still considered a NEW NURSE if it is under 12 months.
    2) If you fail during orientation, it is generally not a reflection on you but rather more a reflection of a failure of the training process. I am very thankful that I left the small town (we also have no children, which is what small towns are all about!) where I was going to: 1) have no support, 2) have no friends, and 3) dealing with the "old boys club" (clicks which I didn't fit in with because I was not from there).
    Count your blessings that you get a new start!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Nov 18 '17

    I had a similar experience for my first nursing job. After 'resigning' from a small-town hospital (I was not from the small town), I took a job as a private duty RN for a quadriplegic for about 3 months in the same small town. The beauty of private duty night shift is they train you how to take care of the ONE PATIENT and SAME PATIENT every night. I put a lot of skills under my belt and on my resume from this experience (tube-feedings, vent care, etc.............). The skills from this job allowed me to apply for another New Nurse orientation at another hospital in a big town where they were more willing to actually train (& mentor) the new nurses. What you need to know is two things:
    1) Apply within the first year for another orientation as you are still considered a NEW NURSE if it is under 12 months.
    2) If you fail during orientation, it is generally not a reflection on you but rather more a reflection of a failure of the training process. I am very thankful that I left the small town (we also have no children, which is what small towns are all about!) where I was going to: 1) have no support, 2) have no friends, and 3) dealing with the "old boys club" (clicks which I didn't fit in with because I was not from there).
    Count your blessings that you get a new start!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Nov 5 '17

    I had a similar experience for my first nursing job. After 'resigning' from a small-town hospital (I was not from the small town), I took a job as a private duty RN for a quadriplegic for about 3 months in the same small town. The beauty of private duty night shift is they train you how to take care of the ONE PATIENT and SAME PATIENT every night. I put a lot of skills under my belt and on my resume from this experience (tube-feedings, vent care, etc.............). The skills from this job allowed me to apply for another New Nurse orientation at another hospital in a big town where they were more willing to actually train (& mentor) the new nurses. What you need to know is two things:
    1) Apply within the first year for another orientation as you are still considered a NEW NURSE if it is under 12 months.
    2) If you fail during orientation, it is generally not a reflection on you but rather more a reflection of a failure of the training process. I am very thankful that I left the small town (we also have no children, which is what small towns are all about!) where I was going to: 1) have no support, 2) have no friends, and 3) dealing with the "old boys club" (clicks which I didn't fit in with because I was not from there).
    Count your blessings that you get a new start!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Nov 4 '17

    I had a similar experience for my first nursing job. After 'resigning' from a small-town hospital (I was not from the small town), I took a job as a private duty RN for a quadriplegic for about 3 months in the same small town. The beauty of private duty night shift is they train you how to take care of the ONE PATIENT and SAME PATIENT every night. I put a lot of skills under my belt and on my resume from this experience (tube-feedings, vent care, etc.............). The skills from this job allowed me to apply for another New Nurse orientation at another hospital in a big town where they were more willing to actually train (& mentor) the new nurses. What you need to know is two things:
    1) Apply within the first year for another orientation as you are still considered a NEW NURSE if it is under 12 months.
    2) If you fail during orientation, it is generally not a reflection on you but rather more a reflection of a failure of the training process. I am very thankful that I left the small town (we also have no children, which is what small towns are all about!) where I was going to: 1) have no support, 2) have no friends, and 3) dealing with the "old boys club" (clicks which I didn't fit in with because I was not from there).
    Count your blessings that you get a new start!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Nov 4 '17

    I had a similar experience for my first nursing job. After 'resigning' from a small-town hospital (I was not from the small town), I took a job as a private duty RN for a quadriplegic for about 3 months in the same small town. The beauty of private duty night shift is they train you how to take care of the ONE PATIENT and SAME PATIENT every night. I put a lot of skills under my belt and on my resume from this experience (tube-feedings, vent care, etc.............). The skills from this job allowed me to apply for another New Nurse orientation at another hospital in a big town where they were more willing to actually train (& mentor) the new nurses. What you need to know is two things:
    1) Apply within the first year for another orientation as you are still considered a NEW NURSE if it is under 12 months.
    2) If you fail during orientation, it is generally not a reflection on you but rather more a reflection of a failure of the training process. I am very thankful that I left the small town (we also have no children, which is what small towns are all about!) where I was going to: 1) have no support, 2) have no friends, and 3) dealing with the "old boys club" (clicks which I didn't fit in with because I was not from there).
    Count your blessings that you get a new start!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Nov 3 '17

    I had a similar experience for my first nursing job. After 'resigning' from a small-town hospital (I was not from the small town), I took a job as a private duty RN for a quadriplegic for about 3 months in the same small town. The beauty of private duty night shift is they train you how to take care of the ONE PATIENT and SAME PATIENT every night. I put a lot of skills under my belt and on my resume from this experience (tube-feedings, vent care, etc.............). The skills from this job allowed me to apply for another New Nurse orientation at another hospital in a big town where they were more willing to actually train (& mentor) the new nurses. What you need to know is two things:
    1) Apply within the first year for another orientation as you are still considered a NEW NURSE if it is under 12 months.
    2) If you fail during orientation, it is generally not a reflection on you but rather more a reflection of a failure of the training process. I am very thankful that I left the small town (we also have no children, which is what small towns are all about!) where I was going to: 1) have no support, 2) have no friends, and 3) dealing with the "old boys club" (clicks which I didn't fit in with because I was not from there).
    Count your blessings that you get a new start!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Nov 3 '17

    I had a similar experience for my first nursing job. After 'resigning' from a small-town hospital (I was not from the small town), I took a job as a private duty RN for a quadriplegic for about 3 months in the same small town. The beauty of private duty night shift is they train you how to take care of the ONE PATIENT and SAME PATIENT every night. I put a lot of skills under my belt and on my resume from this experience (tube-feedings, vent care, etc.............). The skills from this job allowed me to apply for another New Nurse orientation at another hospital in a big town where they were more willing to actually train (& mentor) the new nurses. What you need to know is two things:
    1) Apply within the first year for another orientation as you are still considered a NEW NURSE if it is under 12 months.
    2) If you fail during orientation, it is generally not a reflection on you but rather more a reflection of a failure of the training process. I am very thankful that I left the small town (we also have no children, which is what small towns are all about!) where I was going to: 1) have no support, 2) have no friends, and 3) dealing with the "old boys club" (clicks which I didn't fit in with because I was not from there).
    Count your blessings that you get a new start!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Nov 3 '17

    I had a similar experience for my first nursing job. After 'resigning' from a small-town hospital (I was not from the small town), I took a job as a private duty RN for a quadriplegic for about 3 months in the same small town. The beauty of private duty night shift is they train you how to take care of the ONE PATIENT and SAME PATIENT every night. I put a lot of skills under my belt and on my resume from this experience (tube-feedings, vent care, etc.............). The skills from this job allowed me to apply for another New Nurse orientation at another hospital in a big town where they were more willing to actually train (& mentor) the new nurses. What you need to know is two things:
    1) Apply within the first year for another orientation as you are still considered a NEW NURSE if it is under 12 months.
    2) If you fail during orientation, it is generally not a reflection on you but rather more a reflection of a failure of the training process. I am very thankful that I left the small town (we also have no children, which is what small towns are all about!) where I was going to: 1) have no support, 2) have no friends, and 3) dealing with the "old boys club" (clicks which I didn't fit in with because I was not from there).
    Count your blessings that you get a new start!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



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