PALS Certification - page 2

Hi All, I'm a new med surg nurse. I have the PALS certification coming up and honestly I'm scared to death! I bought the online version of American Heart Association's PALS course. Now I just have... Read More

  1. by   oldandintheway
    Quote from oldandintheway
    ]Okay I lost my awesome response, PALS, I bet what scares you is leading the MEGA CODE. Here is what is going to happen, you will be chosen to lead a team in a vignette. You will have one shock scenario that transitions to a cardiac scenario that if you do ok will resolve to ROSC. Shock will start as either Hypovolemic, Distributive,Cardiogenic, or Obstructive,each has a few subtypes but learn to recognize the and you are gold.
    The shocks will transition to cardiac cases. The is only one Brady, SVT (non-shockable) (cardiovertable), PVT and A-Fib (shockable) and PEA/Asystole (non-shockable). Only a few meds, atropine, epi, epi, amiodirone, epi, amiodirone, epi, epi, and epi. Helpful to remember NS by the bunch, diphenhydramine, and a splash of iontropes, if you catch my drift. Make page 107 your friend.
    If inclined learn the classes of the meds, which are catecholimines, antiandenrgics, etc. than the use becomes automatic through all the class ACLS, PALS, NNRP.
    SO AFTER ALL THAT JUST REMEMBER THE 4 TYPES OF SHOCKS AND 4-5 RYTHMS. you'll be gold just remember page 107 and the algorithms, the written test is just retention of the videos and critical thinking.

    Sorry for the wordiness, but there is a lot in the book that will make you chase your tail.
    Corrected for clarity
  2. by   newmedsurgnurse
    Hi Aspie,

    You're not alone, I too feel overwhelmed by this class, especially not having taken ACLS first. But I did find this great study guide that I think you would find useful. Hopefully the link below will cut and paste. Also, my study method so far has been this:

    1) MEMORIZE study material. I've made a million sticky notes and put them around my house so I see them over and over. Like some on the bathroom mirror, others by the lightswitch in my room, just places I will see them everyday.

    I read the manual and re-read the parts that were a little confusing. As for examples, I kind of tried to make up examples in my mind that fit a scenario and then thought about how I would fix a kid. For example, I had a kid who was lethargic with mottled skin tone come into a clinic, and pulses are weak and thready. So kind of went through things like that in my mind, trying to make the information human.

    2) Then I copied the algorithms and have just been studying studying studying those and memorizing drugs associated with those. The study guide below was good for cardiac rhythms.

    3) Also know the childhood respiratory issues, like croup and the interventions for those.

    4) Ok and this might seem really stupid, but I actually got out a stuffed animal, and some other household items and just thought of each one as my IV fluids, AED, meds, etc and went through the motions of the different algorithms and how to treat them. I did compressions and checked for breathing, everything. I think the bunny rabbit will live!

    Honestly don't know if my study plan will have worked til after the class. But hopefully you will be able to use some of the info to help.

    http://www.americanheartclasses.com/...tudy_Guide.pdf
  3. by   newmedsurgnurse
    Quote from oldandintheway
    ]Okay I lost my awesome response, PALS, I bet what scares you is leading the MEGA CODE. Here is what is going to happen, you will be chosen to lead a team in a vignette. You will have one shock scenario that transitions to a cardiac scenario that if you do ok will resolve to ROSC. Shock will start as either Hypovolemic, Distributive,Cardiogenic, or Obstructive,each has a few subtypes but learn to recognize the and you are gold.
    The shocks will transition to cardiac cases. The is only one Brady, SVT (non-shockable) (cardiovertable), PCT and A-Fib, and PEA/Asystole (non-shockable). Only a few meds, atropine, epi, epi, amiodirone, epi, amiodirone, epi, epi, and epi. Helpful to remember NS by the bunch, diphenhydramine, and a splash of iontropes, if you catch my drift. Make page 107 your friend.
    If inclined learn the classes of the meds, which are catecholimines, antiandenrgics, etc. than the use becomes automatic through all the class ACLS, PALS, NNRP.
    SO AFTER ALL THAT JUST REMEMBER THE 4 TYPES OF SHOCKS AND 4-5 RYTHMS. you'll be gold just remember page 107 and the algorithms, the written test is just retention of the videos and critical thinking.

    Sorry for the wordiness, but there is a lot in the book that will make you chase your tail.
    Thank you thank you thank you for this tip!!!! Thank you everyone for all the help and encouragement. I kind of view kids differently now, like I'll be at the grocery store and a kid will be running around and I'll think shoot what will I do if he collapses in respiratory failure right now? lol. Thank you guys for all the great comments!
  4. by   zzbxdo
    If you've taken ACLS before, the material is vastly the same. My last renewal class had dialysis RNs that never sees pediatrics and they did fine.
  5. by   m0lasses
    Study the algorithms and look up what you have questions about. the testing is from the algorithms pretty much. Ask why that is the intervention and figure out the answer. It is not as bad as it seems.
  6. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from Wade B
    PALS is something we all should be proficient in.
    In a decade of practicing as a nurse, I have never once provided nursing care to any pediatric patients and prefer to keep it this way.

    I realize I could encounter an unresponsive child in public, but PALS doesn't really help when there's no cardioactive drugs to push into the lifeless toddler at Walmart.
  7. by   Aspie
    I understand that PALS is extremely rare thing to use, but my employer requires me to take it.

    I hope I won't ever need it. But with the childhood obesity epidemic we already see kids with clogged arteries and MIs before reaching 30 yrs old. It's getting worse.
  8. by   duaneconnell7
    Since we're on the topic, the new 2015 AHA guidelines are coming out already. I found a company that already has the AHA updated algo cards and classes: Release Schedule for 2016 AHA Guidelines
  9. by   sunflower83b
    Ok, I am needing to take PALS for my employer for the first time as well. When I first took ACLS, in 2012, I had a paramedic and it was HARD, at least half of us had to remediate and redo the megacode, or practical final. Study ahead of time, big time. I never use ACLS or PALS, but my employer requires them, so I have to review the material every single time for ACLS, even after this many years. This past year the recert was WAY easier than the initial cert class, not sure if it was because an educator taught it or because it is an easier class.

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