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LPN or RN

Pre-Nursing   (1,044 Views 7 Comments)
by kaytlyn_Yvonne3 kaytlyn_Yvonne3 (New Member) New Member

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I am recently a new medical student I just completed my CNA but I was curious if I should start right into RN or begin as LPN

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roser13 has 17 years experience and works as a RN.

50,503 Visitors; 6,504 Posts

That would depend completely upon your goals, your resources and how you foresee your future. I will mention, however, that it is probably more appropriate to say that you plan to enter the field of nursing, rather than the field of medicine.

Once you start either an LPN or RN program, you will be a nursing student, not a medical student. I know it seems picky, but if you tell someone that you plan to enter the field of medicine, the assumption will be that you plan to become a medical doctor.

Good luck with your decision !

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6,636 Visitors; 550 Posts

You have to weigh your options. I chose LPN then RN because of my circumstances but it took longer and cost more to go that route.

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mappers works as a RN.

8,506 Visitors; 437 Posts

You have to look at your goals, opportunities, and resources to make this decision. One thing to remember, LPN is a vocational certificate whereas RN is a degree (either Associate's or Bachelor's.) I teach in an LPN program and it frustrates me when students complain that their LPN classes won't transfer to a university. They won't because they are not the same kinds of classes, nor the same type of programs. It's like similar to the fact that your drafting classes taken at vocational school won't transfer to the engineering or architecture school at the university.

If your goal is to be an RN and you afford can go to school for 4 years and have the grades to get into a BSN program, do that. A Bachelor's degree is always more valuable in regards to future opportunities than the other two. However, if you need to start working asap, go to an Associate's program and do a bridge later. If you don't have the grades to get into an RN program, then go LPN. You are still learning, will be able to get a job, move up the ranks, and can find great satisfaction in your work.

LPNs are valuable, perform an important job and do wonderful work. If that is the route you need to take, then take it. Just know what path you are taking. Research it and don't rely solely on what the school recruiters tell you.

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TiffyRN has 26 years experience and works as a RN.

15,451 Visitors; 2,234 Posts

Also be aware that in many many areas of the country, LPNs (LVNs) are not usually employed in acute care (hospitals) and by and large practice in long-term care. Hospitals that hire LPNs rarely hire into specialty areas like ICU, Mother/Baby, ER or OR. Many new graduate RNs nowadays express frustration over not being hired into acute care or specialty areas. You are wise to ask questions about this before you finish some program and are frustrated because your degree will not meet the qualifications for the areas where you would like to practice.

An important part of your inquiries should be about your local job market. There are huge differences between the marketability of different levels (LPN, RN, BSN) in NY State vs. North Dakota or bordertown Texas. Ask around, and make sure you know the market for new graduate LPNs/RNs/BSNs, not experienced as you will start as a new graduate.

Regarding what others have said about "medicine" vs. "nursing." This is a fine point but as you progress in your learning, you will understand how medicine and nursing are complementary but not the same field much like physical therapy or pharmacology.

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