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LPN to RN

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trina820 trina820 (New) New

Do you guys think its better to start off as a LPN than move up to RN or just go to be a RN.:eek::eek:

JBudd, MSN

Specializes in Trauma, Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

This has been discussed many many times here, try searching the threads for it.

It comes down to your circumstances. abilities to get into school, opportunities etc. One study I looked at for a paper (on a different subject), said LPN to BSN-RN students had a lower NCLEX pass rate than those going straight for the BSN, which seemed odd. I respect my LPNs, but the market is getting harder for LPNs to find hospital work according to many posters here. If you have the resources and circumstances that allow you to go for the RN directly, it seems the way to go. Needing the LPN first is a reality for many people, to whom I say go for it!

Daytonite, BSN, RN

Specializes in med/surg, telemetry, IV therapy, mgmt. Has 40 years experience.

do you guys think its better to start off as a lpn than move up to rn or just go to be a rn.

i have seen lots of lpns i have worked with do this. it's a waste of your time and money. if becoming an
rn
is your goal, then go to
rn
school. the two jobs are not the same. the
rn
bridge programs expect and assume that lpns already know the information that their first year
rn
students have been learning. that is not always true because lpn programs are so varied in what they teach. so many of the lpns i worked with had a really hard time catching up with the
rn
students they were mainstreamed into because of this lapse in their educational background. rns are taught to be managers of patient care; lpns are not. rns are taught to prioritize and delegate patient care; lpns are not. rns are taught to think critically and made decisions about patient care all the time; some lpn programs teach this, but whether the lpns get to put it into practice is doubtful.

If I had it all over to do again (or know what I know now), I definitely would have went for the RN first.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

If the RN licensure is a person's ultimate goal, then he/she should make every reasonable attempt to pursue it directly with no deviations in the plan. Life's circumstances prevented me from attaining the RN license first, so I am now an LVN who is currently enrolled in an RN bridge program.

However, I must say that I have absolutely no regrets for attaining my LVN licensure first. I presently work weekend double shifts at a pay rate of $25 hourly, and am paid for a full 40-hour work week while having Monday through Friday off to attend school. Many of the mainstream, generic RN students are struggling with finances during school due to having to accept low-paying jobs as CNAs/techs or as the result of not being able to work at all. When students have ample money in the form of earnings and savings, many of their financial stressors are effectively relieved during school. Therefore, the monetary aspects of attaining the LPN license first are worth pondering, as it has personally been rather comforting for me to attend school without feeling poor.

I feel that are good LPNs and RNs it really just depends on the purpose. I would say that in LPN school you get

more hands on. I think it really just depends on what you wanna do and the need for time.

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