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Likely moving to Ireland from US ... NMBI?

Posted

Has 17 years experience.

Hello,

My husband received a job offer from his company that is based in US but has a new location in Ireland. I was looking into applying for approval from NMBI but it states 12 months of practice is required within the past 5 years. I left bedside nursing 18 years ago and have worked in health insurance in different roles like your/UM, audit, medical claim review, etc. Will that meet the 12 months of practice requirement? Or do I need to have actual 'hands on' nursing care to apply through NMBI? Also, not sure which work permit my husband will be under--transfer or critical skills? That seems to make a difference in whether the spouse is qualified to work, too. Feeling very overwhelmed! Anyone been through this with Ireland?

Thank you! - AJ

Cloud9RN, BSN

Specializes in Neuro Spine/ Acute Rehab. Has 12 years experience.

Hi. We had somewhat the same scenario. When I applied in 2017 my last bedside experience was in 2012 but from 2015-2017 I was working as UM nurse in the Philippines and I used that experience on my NMBI application and they accepted it. Nursing experience doesn't have to be bedside experience. As long as your are practicing your profession be it in a clinic, company nurse, insurance nurse you are good to go. I got my registration in Ireland in 2017 however in 2018 I moved here in the US.

waufah, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU,Tele,Interventional Radiology,PACU,Research. Has 14 years experience.

Hi AJ,

  1. I was able to apply for a PIN with the NMBI in 2018 and found the process was quite frustrating.If you are obliged to hold a nursing license in your current job,then that should be enough as experience within the last year.
  2. You need a BSN atleast or further courses after your ASN. The NMBI is very specific,you must follow the application pack,do not leave blanks and explain everything. You also need to call and email them constantly on any update on you application. They lost my paperwork twice, make COPIES of everything you send.
  3. After all that and they finally say you can get on the register,you will need an employer to sponsor you for a supervised adaptation period of 6 weeks or you can sit the OSCE( a 2 day exam of mutiple questions and 12 clinical scenarios),this will cost 3,000Euros. I had to take the OSCE because I couldnt find an employer to sponsor me.......after mutiple emails and resume appplications.
  4. You brought up the issue of immigration. Most employee get a Stamp 1 through work sponsorship. The stamp 1 consist of critical skills,hosting agreement(research), and general employment permits. As it stands only spouses of critical skills and hosting agreement permit holders are allowed to work. You husband is better off insisiting on a critical skills permit or else you have to get an employer to sponsor you for a work permit if you want to work here.
  5. Lastly,nursing in Ireland is very different from America. I work in research but I do visit the hospitals in their health system(HSE) . You might find it hard to work in the wards,try something in management or private hospitals.

If you can, see if your employer will let you work remotely or find jobs that will. There are alot of pharmas here that you might find a job without needing a license. Also all the jobs are in Dublin.

AJL_91

Has 17 years experience.

Thanks for the great replies and info! I just noticed the spell checker changed "U/R" to 'your' in my original message ... LOL.

Well, because of the virus his offer is now on hold and may not happen at all. What a bummer. But the company said they will continue to keep him in mind when things pick up again. Not really a good time to be moving to another country, I suppose.

Thanks again for the wonderful replies!!

Edited by AJL_91

Whittles25

Specializes in Oncology. Has 19 years experience.

I am in also looking at moving to Ireland with my family. Looking at the extensive process for NMBI requirements. I have my BSN- but I am fully expecting the board to say my education requirements are not sufficient as they require 2300 clinical hours!

@waufah- so interested to see that you paid 3000 Euro for the OSCE- WOW!! Did you find the test difficult? Did you have a way to study? I am trying to prepare myself for all scenarios. I have been an outpatient nurse for 17 years- I never did inpatient so I'm wondering if that will set me back.

I will be submitting the first step in the application process within the next month or so.

Cloud9RN, BSN

Specializes in Neuro Spine/ Acute Rehab. Has 12 years experience.

7 hours ago, Whittles25 said:

I am in also looking at moving to Ireland with my family. Looking at the extensive process for NMBI requirements. I have my BSN- but I am fully expecting the board to say my education requirements are not sufficient as they require 2300 clinical hours!

@waufah- so interested to see that you paid 3000 Euro for the OSCE- WOW!! Did you find the test difficult? Did you have a way to study? I am trying to prepare myself for all scenarios. I have been an outpatient nurse for 17 years- I never did inpatient so I'm wondering if that will set me back.

I will be submitting the first step in the application process within the next month or so.

OSCE is easy if you are prepared for it. Back in 2017 there was like 15 stations that you have to undergo. There are situational questions, there are procedures to that you have to perform like NGT insertion, 5 moments of hand hygiene, wound care etc. etc.

Edited by Cloud9RN

Whittles25

Specializes in Oncology. Has 19 years experience.

Thanks Cloud9RN. I would definitely have to prepare myself and study. I've been an outpatient nurse for 17 years! So I haven't put an NG tube in since nursing school :-/. (haven't inserted a Foley in many years, haven't done wound care).

I am hoping to work in outpatient oncology like I do now- giving chemotherapy etc. So I definitely need to study skills. I'm also planning somehow study and learn about how the system is different as far as lab results among other technical differences. (My brother-in-law is a nurse for NHS and he has shared stories that show me how labs (glucose etc) may be reported differently). Should be interesting to try and study nursing and procedures in Ireland while in the US!

waufah, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU,Tele,Interventional Radiology,PACU,Research. Has 14 years experience.

On 8/6/2020 at 7:55 AM, Cloud9RN said:

OSCE is easy if you are prepared for it. Back in 2017 there was like 15 stations that you have to undergo. There are situational questions, there are procedures to that you have to perform like NGT insertion, 5 moments of hand hygiene, wound care etc. etc.

Totally agree.

Edited by waufah
spelling

waufah, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU,Tele,Interventional Radiology,PACU,Research. Has 14 years experience.

On 8/5/2020 at 11:57 PM, Whittles25 said:

I am in also looking at moving to Ireland with my family. Looking at the extensive process for NMBI requirements. I have my BSN- but I am fully expecting the board to say my education requirements are not sufficient as they require 2300 clinical hours!

@waufah- so interested to see that you paid 3000 Euro for the OSCE- WOW! Did you find the test difficult? Did you have a way to study? I am trying to prepare myself for all scenarios. I have been an outpatient nurse for 17 years- I never did inpatient so I'm wondering if that will set me back.

I will be submitting the first step in the application process within the next month or so.

It is my understanding the NMBI has started to consider job experience as part of the clinical hours and now most US-educated nurses with hopefully qualify without being short on hours? My BSN was 128 credits, of those 63 were nursing. My nursing department had to break it down to hours. I actually had to sit down with the Dean of Nursing because it was a first time for them, we went through each semester of nursing and explained to NMBI what I did and how many hours were clinical(don't forget those lab sessions!). I also listed my jobs held for the last 5 years(luckily it was with the same company). Listed hours worked per year(you need your payslips). Listed any CEUs and conferences attended, certifications obtained during those years.

I paid the 3000Euros because it gave me the autonomy to pick my employer and the job I wanted, also I was having trouble finding a sponsor.

The OSCE is not hard or easy but you can pass if you prepare. Think of if as Fundamentals of Nursing, which you have already done and undertaken in your current job. I found the Royal Marsden Manual of Clinical Nursing book helpful, it is the bible of procedures here. HSELand is another portal, it has online courses for free. This will help you familiarize yourself with the Irish Health System protocols. The multiple-choice question was easy, think ADCDE approach and the nursing process all the way. I would advise looking into the Irish Code of Conduct for Nurses. https://www.nmbi.ie/Registration/Trained-outside-Ireland/Important-Standards-Guidance

You will be okay. You just need to refresh your memory then it will all come back to you.

Whittles25

Specializes in Oncology. Has 19 years experience.

Thank you so much for all of this information. It will help so much to have these resources for studying.

My husband is an Irish citizen and we are looking at moving our family for a hopefully great experience. I would want to continue doing what I do now- outpatient oncology. So it would be up to me to pay out of pocket as well for the OSCE so I could pick my job. (I really love what I do)

I also appreciate you mentioning all of the paperwork you included with your application- pay stubs, ceu's/conferences. I had not thought of that and it makes sense to have as much info as possible for the board. I ordered my transcript from my University so I could take a look. I do not see how the NMBI could make sense of it- Clinical hours are definitely not listed or separated from Theoretical. I'll have to ask very nicely for my nursing program to help sort it out.

Thanks again for the info waufah!

Thank you for all this great info!! I have dual citizenship (US and Irish/EU) and we are contemplating a move to Europe. My partner is applying to MFA programs, I have family in Ireland, and given that it's english speaking, it seemed like a good base. But, now I'm not so sure after reading about getting licensed, I'm pretty intimidated by the process. I have an ADN with 3 years  acute care (2 observation unit, 1 ER). Waufuh, you managed to do it! But, you also have much more experience. (Though, maybe that's irrelevant after reading about all these incredible candidates who can't get registered!?) How long did the whole process take? We are looking at about a 2 year timeline, during which I may be able to get my BSN, or even NP. Having a better idea of what's needed may direct my studies. Waufuh, how long did the whole process take? Do you know if there are agencies that can help facilitate the process or are they irrelevant for this? Would an master's level education give me better odds? (Though I don't think I actually want to work as an NP - I don't want the liability.) Waufuh, you said that nursing is very different in IRL than US, would you be able to speak to that a little more?

 

Thanks in advance for your time!