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Let go from job during orientation

Nurses   (5,654 Views | 30 Replies)

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"Not making progress", and "making mistakes" are fair reasons for you to be cut from the position you temporarily held in Oncology, an area where little to no margin for error exists. It was ill-advised to assume the magnitude of responsibility that area presents without an intensive, supervised orientation or prior nursing experience. "Nervousness" is not a condition that can excuse errors, so you need to reflect on your comfort level and preparedness for assuming the care of those critically ill or totally dependent.

Yeah I agree. I wish I gave myself more time to think about the patient acuity. It's a learning experience for sure

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Daisy4RN has 20 years experience and specializes in Travel, Home Health, Med-Surg.

1 Follower; 1 Article; 1,176 Posts; 7,238 Profile Views

Yeah I agree. I wish I gave myself more time to think about the patient acuity. It's a learning experience for sure

You are a new nurse and don't know what you don't know; However, the facility knows and should either not have hired a new grad or gave proper training. Not your fault but still a good learning experience moving forward.

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ArrowRN has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Med Surg, Vascular, E.N.T.

5 Articles; 1,145 Posts; 28,906 Profile Views

What are your thoughts on an obervation unit? Would that be a good floor for a new grad? I applied to ortho and med surg so far

I resigned from my first job after 3 weeks as a new grad, did not feel safe. Being let go during orientation just means you were not the right fit for that job or unit and I would also bring to question the training being offerred to you which lead to mistakes. People are quick to blame the RN and not the process, If this is the "culture" in that facility I would look elsewhere. What was your patient ratios? Sounds like too many red flags. Being let go there should be no harmful repurcussions to your future as a RN.

On an observation unit you will not be good fit for a new grad, in my opinion. As the population changes and stay is usually less than 48 hours, fast paced, where they are "observed and monitored" to either be discharged or admitted and you won't really "learn" a specific patient population, that could be confusing for a new grad.

A med surg floor would be best for a new grad, the type of med surg floor is up to your interests. I work on a cardio-vascular floor, lots of AAA's and bypass surgeries post op, we also had ENT at one point lots of trachs and suctioning and high risk aspirations but now we got transplant patients. Ortho, would be a literal "pain" think broken bones, fast paced and giving lots of pain medications. A strictly medical floor is more slower paced , not many people going for surgeries such as A hospitalist floor or Family medicine floor is a good learning back ground then you can leave after 1 year if you hate it. Browse around and identify your interests first, despite and pressure you got to start working.

After 6 months at my hospital you are able to float and pick up extra shifts on other medical surg floors so you can find what you really like. I dont particularly like med-surg but the people I work with makes the different and I been at it over 3 years on same floor.

Edited by ArrowRN

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16 Posts; 766 Profile Views

I resigned from my first job after 3 weeks as a new grad, did not feel safe. Being let go during orientation just means you were not the right fit for that job or unit and I would also bring to question the training being offerred to you which lead to mistakes. People are quick to blame the RN and not the process, If this is the "culture" in that facility I would look elsewhere. What was your patient ratios? Sounds like too many red flags. Being let go there should be no harmful repurcussions to your future as a RN.

On an observation unit you will not be good fit for a new grad, in my opinion. As the population changes and stay is usually less than 48 hours, fast paced, where they are "observed and monitored" to either be discharged or admitted and you won't really "learn" a specific patient population, that could be confusing for a new grad.

A med surg floor would be best for a new grad, the type of med surg floor is up to your interests. I work on a cardio-vascular floor, lots of AAA's and bypass surgeries post op, we also had ENT at one point lots of trachs and suctioning and high risk aspirations but now we got transplant patients. Ortho, would be a literal "pain" think broken bones, fast paced and giving lots of pain medications. A strictly medical floor is more slower paced , not many people going for surgeries such as A hospitalist floor or Family medicine floor is a good learning back ground then you can leave after 1 year if you hate it. Browse around and identify your interests first, despite and pressure you got to start working.

After 6 months at my hospital you are able to float and pick up extra shifts on other medical surg floors so you can find what you really like. I dont particularly like med-surg but the people I work with makes the different and I been at it over 3 years on same floor.

Nurse-patient ratios depends on day or night and the staff available. Days can be like 1:4-6 and nights could have been up to 7. I should have declined the offer when I heard that but I was too excited about the offer. I made a mistake but I learned from it. Thank you for your feedback

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ArrowRN has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Med Surg, Vascular, E.N.T.

5 Articles; 1,145 Posts; 28,906 Profile Views

Yeah I did the same as well due to excitement plus a family of 4 and none or us working. bills piling up, that first job I left had 7:1 ratios, I felt like I learned nothing and was exhausted and unsafe. I now work with a hospital with strict 5:1 ratios, makes all the difference. My second job is part-time and they got 6:1 ratios, its doable but on the edge of crazy unsafe, but i got more experience now so I handle it.

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16 Posts; 766 Profile Views

Update: I was called for an interview on a medsurg unit at the same hospital. Interview is Tuesday at 9 am!!

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Aunt Slappy has 2 years experience and specializes in hospice, LTC, public health, occupational health.

271 Posts; 3,542 Profile Views

The fact that they referred you to other units in the same place actually speaks very well of you. It means they don't think you're a bad nurse or that you can't learn, you just weren't ready for that unit, but you might be with more experience. Clearly they think you should stick around and learn more. Good luck with the med surg interview.

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