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Left while on medical leave

Nurses   (1,131 Views 5 Comments)
by autumn1212 autumn1212 (New) New

autumn1212 has 1 years experience .

350 Profile Views; 1 Post

I was working as a new nurse for under a year and needed a medical leave. I was on leave for 2 months and decided it would be best for me not to go back. I resigned. I am now months later having so much trouble landing a job. I had many interviews but no offers. I am thinking they are confused why I would leave such a job. I would appreciate your feedback. Thanks.

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Jules A is a MSN and specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

2 Followers; 8,863 Posts; 47,082 Profile Views

I would think they are more concerned that you will work for them for a few months, request medical leave and then resign again. Perhaps address that in your interviews?

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westieluv has 26 years experience and specializes in Med/Surg, Tele, Dialysis, Hospice.

948 Posts; 19,725 Profile Views

Just in the last couple of years, it seems like I have worked with and heard about more and more nurses utilizing their FMLA leave to ease their way out of a job that they don't like but don't necessarily feel comfortable quitting outright. I worked with a nurse in dialysis recently who went on FMLA leave as soon as she could and then kept getting it extended when the time approached for her leave to end. She finally did end up resigning, but I was told that she had done this at least twice in the past with other jobs that she didn't like.

I'm not implying that that is what you did, but if this is happening more and more all over, then the fact that you took leave and resigned while you were off is probably a red flag for people who could potentially hire you. as the PP said, I would address it up front in your interview, and not let them find out about it on their own, because then it might appear like you were trying to hide something from them.

Edited by westieluv

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Meriwhen is a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in Psych ICU, addictions.

2 Followers; 4 Articles; 7,906 Posts; 59,694 Profile Views

Well, you can't undo what you did.

I would definitely be upfront with what happened instead of letting them find out when they call to verify your employment (contrary to rumor, you past employer isn't necessarily limited to sharing only your dates of employment and rehire status). I would also reassure them that this isn't something that is likely to happen again...and mean it no matter where you are hired next.

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

11 Followers; 66 Articles; 13,948 Posts; 171,930 Profile Views

As others have said, address the circumstances of leaving your last job right up front rather than waiting for them to discover it on their own. You might also wish to address the fear that you will do the same thing in your next job -- explain how you've learned from this experience and how you have every intention of spending five years at your next job.

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