Is it worth becoming an NP at 45 years of age?

Specialties NP

Updated:   Published

  • by Sage1
    Specializes in BSN, RN.

You are reading page 3 of Is it worth becoming an NP at 45 years of age?

aywl

137 Posts

Nursing is my second career, I am planning to take NP also, at my age >50, I am also worrying about age discrimination, just  inquiry, if NP can be self-employed as a family doctor ?  I can't afford retirement  as the inflation is so bad; 

kit123

7 Posts

That is a great question.  My husband is an MD and we have seven other MDs in the family. You may want to address this with both HR, the AANC and the AANP. 

There are challenges with running your own business, chiefly liability. In addition liability is different in different states. Still if you felt that you could modify that risk somewhat based on geography and job type, this may be useful. Please understand that I am sympathetic yet concerned about the following

1- Given certain lobby & research forces, we may need to work on different licensure for much of our working career. If you doubt this look at the AMA  or PPP agenda or the following--- > See the paragraph about us. It is not all positive 

https://clearhealthcosts.com/blog/2023/08/this-doctor-says-corporate-medicine-is-a-threat-to-public-health/

2- AI will be coming soon & will be able to evaluate local and global practice. So while our support our increased education and growth there will be competitors. Who for instance

Family Practitioners if they show better MLE scores, Cognitive Psychologists who prescribe. RPh team who with nine specialty board certifications are looking to prescribe, plus proponents of functional med.

To approach this with an even tempered goal, I might consider the following

a- Practice many jobs--- Most talented clinical nurses can do this

b- Be a life long learner

c- *** Adapt to market demands. So if that means doing telemed to help rural settings or working with MUSAs or SNIFs, the whole team benefits.

d- Never assume that other clinical partners won't have their PACs trying to reduce our autonomy but we can be good clinicians even when we work indirectly.

e- Be happy that you contribute because the 21st century of nursing is growing worldwide as evident by the ICN conference in Scotland this year. 

f- Innovate in both the public and the private sector.

 

I am proud of nursing and the work we do plus I look forward to other's insights.

 

 

kit123

7 Posts

Sorry for the errata in number 2

Meant to write

AI ...  So while I  support our increased education and growth there will be competitors. Who do I mean for instance  :

--Family Practitioners if they show better aggregate indices like enhanced MLE scores

 --Cognitive Psychologists who prescribe basic antidepressants

--RPh teams, who with nine specialty board certifications, are looking to prescribe, plus proponents of CAM- functional med.

I am noting that because head to head comparisons on cost and clinical utility are coming. So if any particular discipline is found lacking in outcomes with a comparator who is better, then legislation is likely to reduce the effect of that discipline. 

Nursing -either clinical or advanced practice will not have ability to rest on any historical significance. Rather it will be the individual professional who will need to see if they can impact better than average with less cost. It will also be harder to not be compared to larger data sets of other professionals, even if they are not in our own state. This is because groups like CMS, Medicaid, ACO's etc are there to benefit their clients, not one profession. So they have accountants and data base managers looking over comparator data within our society and  from others to enhance coverage and reduce outlay.

All the best

 

fazou

3 Posts

I'm 56 and starting my NP Program, Nursing is my second career completed my BSN, and am now heading for NP while working full-time as an RN on the Med-Surg floor.  

Sam121

71 Posts

fazou said:

I'm 56 and starting my NP Program, Nursing is my second career completed my BSN, and am now heading for NP while working full-time as an RN on the Med-Surg floor.  

Wow! You are an inspiration to everyone.....

IslanderEllie

18 Posts

Specializes in Primary Care, Remote, and Diabetes Education.

I would go for it! I'm applying for NP schools this year at age 37 so I'll be 40 when I graduate, if all goes well. It all comes down to quality of life and professional enjoyment. For me, I think it would absolutely be worth it even at 45. 

IslanderEllie

18 Posts

Specializes in Primary Care, Remote, and Diabetes Education.
fazou said:

I'm 56 and starting my NP Program, Nursing is my second career completed my BSN, and am now heading for NP while working full-time as an RN on the Med-Surg floor.  

Wow, good for you! Are you glad you made the switch? 

Specializes in Addictions & Substance Abuse.

I started my DNP/FNP program at 38 and will be done at 41/42 years. I already have a masters in nursing but 15 years ago so it's been a while. I don't think 45 is too old. Better now than never 

Specializes in PMHNP.

I asked this question at 34.  I was working with an NP in the ED who was encouraging me to start NP school.  I will repeat her answer...

"How old will you be in 3 years if you go to NP school?  How old would you be if you didn't?"

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