Increasing marketability

Posted
by KRSLPN KRSLPN, LPN Member Nurse

Has 20 years experience.

I have been an LPN for 20 years now, I have 10 years experience in acute care, working a general medical floor, post op surgical floor ( ortho, general surgery) and a step down cardiac unit where as part of my duties we monitored our patients while on the cardiac monitors. I am also IV therapy certified, and have experience inserting IVs for patients receiving simple fluids and antibiotics.

I currently work in LTC passing meds, doing simple wound care, reviewing lab results and phoning dr's for orders related to these results.

I hold valid unrestricted LPN licenses in 2 states, IV therapy certified, current CPR/AED certified, excellent typing and computer skills.

Having stated all of the above, what else can I do, or what course or program can I enroll in, OTHER THEN RETURNING TO SCHOOL TO BECOME AN RN, due to my age and financial situation to make myself more marketable as an LPN?

What are some suggested certifications, and how to obtain them to enhance my nursing skills and knowledge. Hopefully there is someone out there with that piece of information, thank you!

amoLucia

amoLucia

Specializes in retired LTC. 7,735 Posts

Don't know if this can help, but can you expand upon any supervisory/charge nurse experience? Couple that experience with certificates of attendance/completion of CEU programs for that type of managerial skill set could enhance your marketability.

I know LTC freq looks for strong LPNs who can hit the floor running, esp with those 'people' skills to direct staff, handle families & physicians, and to prioritorize (sp?) unit activities, esp emergencies.

Hope that helps. Good luck.

CapeCodMermaid, RN

Specializes in Gerontology, Med surg, Home Health. Has 30 years experience. 6,089 Posts

You may be the best LPN on the planet, but the 5 star rating system is, in part, based on the number of RNs a facility has. We are developing more and more clinical initiatives to be able to keep our residents in house, some of which involve pushing IV meds. LPNs aren't allowed to push IV meds so I need RNs. Is it fair? No. Does being an RN necessarily mean the patient will get better care? No...but the business is the business and the regs are the regs. Good luck

LaneRN

LaneRN

Specializes in geriatrics. 218 Posts

I live in North Carolina and I am an RN but our LPN's can push some IV meds and draw blood form a picc line if they take an IV class that is provided by the facility. This is just an FYI. and may not be true in other states but it is listed on our NCBON web site