Impossible for me to be able to do what I have a desire for....

Posted

Hi, I'll try to make this as short as possible b/c I could go into detail and write a book on what I want to say lol...

I've always wanted to be a nurse but never followed through with it by going to school for it, in fear of being made fun of for being a male nurse (stupid I know, I was young. I regret it now). I graduated from Southern Illinois University-Carbondale in 2007 with a bachelors of kinesiology in specialization in athletic training. I do have a lot of classes that some schools require for pre-req's like stats, A&P I and II, psychology, etc. (can look up the classes on school website). I now reside in South Carolina and am a firefighter/EMT-B...soon to go to intermediate and most likely paramedic within the year because the department will pay for you to go and it's the closest I can get to nursing. I have so much frustration and questions for my desire in becoming a RN. Don't get me wrong, I LOVE my job but I feel I would love being a nurse even more and is the only thing I can see myself doing and isn't a day goes by I don't regret going to school for it plus only getting paid less than >$30k a year isn't really living comfortably now-a-days. I know it's not impossible to work while going but difficult while attending school but like everyone else, I do have bills to pay and can't afford to be taking out another loan to go b/c I'm so deep in the hole from going to the university (35k or somewhere around there) that I can't even afford. Also, with my rotating schedule I can't really take classes b/c i work 24 on and 48 off so therefore I'd somehow have to find a job where I can make the same amount of money and be able to go, etc.

So I guess my question(s) are:

1. Can my EMT help me get anywhere in the nursing field? I know they are two totally different fields as nursing is far more advanced but could it help me get my foot in the door at least and maybe have the hospital/employer pay the tuition for me to go back and attain my RN?

2. Is there any place that I can make this possible? I literally will move anywhere tomorrow to make this possible.

3. What about accelerated nursing courses programs? I imagine you would def. have to not work or work very little to take a "crash course" kind of nursing program.

4. Does anyone know of a sugar momma that will pay for me to go and support me along the way? lol

but on a serious note, I'm so frustrated because I feel I'm in between a rock and a hard spot and will never be able to fulfill this desire I have to be an RN....

BluegrassRN

BluegrassRN

Has 14 years experience. 1,188 Posts

Our hospital hires EMTs in the ED. If you can get on at a hospital, then you would have a schedule more conducive to taking classes.

2011NursingStudent

2011NursingStudent

346 Posts

All of the ER Tech postings I've seen prefer EMT's, so that might make a good second job for you. It only pays $10-$14 an hour usually, but maybe you could work there for a while and get tuition reimbursement as a benefit, or use the extra money to help you pay for school.

79Tango

689 Posts

I know of a Rich Uncle that can help with all of that...Possibly even the Sugar Momma:

Enlist in the US ARMY as a Medic-- Your EMT certification will fast-track you through training allowing you to graduate as an LVN. You then serve out your time (using the Student Loan Repayment program). All the while hopefully taking classes for your RN, if not you can be a full time BSN student when you get out.

They also have a program that will pay Enlisted Soldiers to obtain their BSN allowing them a Direct Commision upon graduation.

Your degree will allow you to start at an advanced rank of E-4, thus bringing the Sugar Momma. (They love men in uniform).

heathert_kc

heathert_kc

Specializes in LTC, AL, Corrections, Home health. Has 3 years experience. 270 Posts

If you able to go back and become a paramedic some community colleges offer paramedic to associates rn programs generally in 12 to 18 months and you likely have all or at least the majority of the general education done already. So you might check around at schools in your area. One of my fellow nursing students in a bilevel rn program, that I just joined this semester as an LPN, is an EMT and a army reserve officer, with a wife and kids and he too works 24 hour shifts I believe, but he has managed to work it out somehow. The program is 2-3 days a week day time hours, think he mostly utilizes his vacation/sick leave when he absolutely has to and then trades with other guys and finds someone to cover 8 hours during the day, then he'll cover a less desireable shift like saturday night or some other time he is available and they'd rather not work. So it may not be fun or comfortable, but I do believe it is doable... Plus community colleges are generally pretty cheap (my entire one year lpn-rn is going to be less than 3000 with tuition, fees, books, etc.), as you have a bs you aren't eligible for financial aide but check into scholarships that are offered by the school, state or outside companies.

Good luck to you.

NPinWCH

NPinWCH

Specializes in Family NP, OB Nursing. Has 15 years experience. 374 Posts

Ok, I hate to say this since I feel that nursing experience is important, but have you considered a direct entry PA or NP program? Since you already have a bachelor degree you qualify.

I did my NP program online, it was flexible, I worked nights mostly, but did flip to days at times. When it was time for clinicals I asked to be scheduled weekends only, which no one complained about.

Like I said, I usually say nursing experience is important, but with your EMT experience you would have some good assessment and prioritization skills I'm sure. I know NP programs can be done part time, which is how I did mine since I had to work, but usually the PA programs are full time. It's something to consider.

I also agree with the others who said look into ER work. I used to work with an excellent medic in the ER...preferred shifts with her over some of the other RNs ;)

MidnightAzalea

MidnightAzalea

58 Posts

I work as an ER Tech using my EMT-B licensure and am now in nursing school. It's definitely doable, and getting your foot in the door helps a LOT. Most hospitals have some form of tuition reimbursement also. While you can do an EMT-P to RN bridge program, you can do an accelerated RN course in the same amount of time. It's pricey, but I'm making it through with student loans.

Good luck!

heyheyhey

heyheyhey

21 Posts

If you able to go back and become a paramedic some community colleges offer paramedic to associates rn programs generally in 12 to 18 months and you likely have all or at least the majority of the general education done already. So you might check around at schools in your area. One of my fellow nursing students in a bilevel rn program, that I just joined this semester as an LPN, is an EMT and a army reserve officer, with a wife and kids and he too works 24 hour shifts I believe, but he has managed to work it out somehow. The program is 2-3 days a week day time hours, think he mostly utilizes his vacation/sick leave when he absolutely has to and then trades with other guys and finds someone to cover 8 hours during the day, then he'll cover a less desireable shift like saturday night or some other time he is available and they'd rather not work. So it may not be fun or comfortable, but I do believe it is doable... Plus community colleges are generally pretty cheap (my entire one year lpn-rn is going to be less than 3000 with tuition, fees, books, etc.), as you have a bs you aren't eligible for financial aide but check into scholarships that are offered by the school, state or outside companies.

Good luck to you.

That did cross my mind as far as doing a shift swap for classes but our department is almost too small I find it would be hard to do that on a regular basis. I also did consider a community college because they are a lot cheaper and the classes they require for pre-req's are not as much from what I've researched. I was thinking about the EMT-P to RN also but I would like to start the RN as soon as possible because paramedic is a good year and a half and then if I did that I'd have to apply wait to get in and go to school for 1-2 years, etc etc. I know I'm still young and have the time I'm just inpatient but if that's what it'd take I'll do it.

Ok, I hate to say this since I feel that nursing experience is important, but have you considered a direct entry PA or NP program? Since you already have a bachelor degree you qualify.

I did my NP program online, it was flexible, I worked nights mostly, but did flip to days at times. When it was time for clinicals I asked to be scheduled weekends only, which no one complained about.

Like I said, I usually say nursing experience is important, but with your EMT experience you would have some good assessment and prioritization skills I'm sure. I know NP programs can be done part time, which is how I did mine since I had to work, but usually the PA programs are full time. It's something to consider.

I also agree with the others who said look into ER work. I used to work with an excellent medic in the ER...preferred shifts with her over some of the other RNs ;)

I might have to look into those. The only programs here for those where I live is MUSC and I'm sure the waiting list is lengthy because I know the waiting list for just nursing is a few years long but that might not be the case. Dunno if I'm smart enough for those either lol. Plus MUSC would be way pricey I'm sure but maybe I could find one that fits my budget better.

Our hospital hires EMTs in the ED. If you can get on at a hospital, then you would have a schedule more conducive to taking classes.

All of the ER Tech postings I've seen prefer EMT's, so that might make a good second job for you. It only pays $10-$14 an hour usually, but maybe you could work there for a while and get tuition reimbursement as a benefit, or use the extra money to help you pay for school.

I work as an ER Tech using my EMT-B licensure and am now in nursing school. It's definitely doable, and getting your foot in the door helps a LOT. Most hospitals have some form of tuition reimbursement also. While you can do an EMT-P to RN bridge program, you can do an accelerated RN course in the same amount of time. It's pricey, but I'm making it through with student loans.

Good luck!

I've applied to a few ER Tech jobs here and I keep getting shut down so all I can do is keep trying with that. If you don't mind me asking Midnight where do you work as a basic and is the hospital paying for you or doing tuition reimbursement? What kind of shifts are you working, FT or PT?

SNIXRN

SNIXRN

Specializes in Critical Care. CVICU. Adult and Peds PACU.. Has 8 years experience. 269 Posts

4. Does anyone know of a sugar momma that will pay for me to go and support me along the way? lol

Haha :)

heyheyhey

heyheyhey

21 Posts

I'm thinking about trying to get into the LPN program they have here to offer so maybe I could get a job working as an LPN and then have the employer pay for me to go back to school and get my RN but that's the plan and don't know if it's going to work out for sure yet.

cogath

cogath

172 Posts

I know of a Rich Uncle that can help with all of that...Possibly even the Sugar Momma:

Enlist in the US ARMY as a Medic-- Your EMT certification will fast-track you through training allowing you to graduate as an LVN. You then serve out your time (using the Student Loan Repayment program). All the while hopefully taking classes for your RN, if not you can be a full time BSN student when you get out.

They also have a program that will pay Enlisted Soldiers to obtain their BSN allowing them a Direct Commision upon graduation.

Your degree will allow you to start at an advanced rank of E-4, thus bringing the Sugar Momma. (They love men in uniform).

Good luck if you have any sort of medical condition that requires medication, or have used an inhaler for asthma within the past 7 years, or have any other disqualifying medical condition :(