Jump to content

Important! Need answers

PCFR411 PCFR411 (New) New

Hey everyone! I'm new to this site. I'm a monitor tech, certified twice. I'm now trying to find a job as a monitor tech but I have to pass a competency exam. This is a test online that includes 41 questions about different rhythms. A lot of the questions would show a rhythm, ask you to interpret it, then it would ask what would you do and give you three options. I was never taught this. The options are:

1. Print out a strip and notify the nurse.

2. Notify the nurse STAT.

3. Notify the nurse STAT and prepare to shock if needed.

I feel kinda strange asking this but I REALLY want to try for this job and I can't believe I was never taught this. Google didn't help at all. If anyone knows what rhythms you should do what for please let me know? Going to retest Thursday.

Also, there were some questions that included NSR with a couple bouts of sinus arrest. Unsure about what to do about that too ... Thank y'all so much!

JustBeachyNurse, RN

Specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics.

If you don't know the answers to an initial competency test for monitor tech, how are you qualified for the job?

If you don't know the answers to an initial competency test for monitor tech, how are you qualified for the job?

Sheeesh, harsh critics here.

She said she's been certified twice before. We all have questions about things, even the most experienced person. Yes, this does sound basic, but I think it's the style of the question that may be confusing.

My opinion is that it's B. I would want to be called immediately and then print strip, or simultaneously.

As far as the sinus arrest, you should google about Sinus pauses, Sinus arrests and Sinus arrhythmias.

JustBeachyNurse, RN

Specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics.

Sheeesh, harsh critics here.

She said she's been certified twice before. We all have questions about things, even the most experienced person. Yes, this does sound basic, but I think it's the style of the question that may be confusing.

My opinion is that it's B. I would want to be called immediately and then print strip, or simultaneously.

In the progress of taking a competency test and posting in a message board for answers? This is isn't a recertification exam this is a competency test for a job she applied for, failure to demonstrate competency = not qualified for the job.

Thank you very much! I appreciate your help and you being nice about it. I have been certified twice before but I was not taught exactly when to notify or notify stat about things like that. Thank you again! :)

I asked for help. That's not a crime. And it's not my fault that I wasn't specifically taught that. I'm not an instructor I am a student. I asked a simple question for help, not for an opinion. Thanks though, I appreciate you being so kind as to offer me one even when I didn't ask! How thoughtful of you.

In the progress of taking a competency test and posting in a message board for answers? This is isn't a recertification exam this is a competency test for a job she applied for, failure to demonstrate competency = not qualified for the job.

It's one or two questions. I barely find that criteria to fail a competency test for a job, licence, certificate, or whatever. Everyone who has passed something like that did not answer 100% of the questions correctly, I know I didn't but I'm a darn good Nurse.

Lighten up a bit

Thank you, again. I just want to improve myself and my knowledge as much as possible. I appreciate your support and kindness.

JustBeachyNurse, RN

Specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics.

Then look online at the arrhythmia class for ACLS preparation from the American Heart Association.

Learn: Rhythm Adult

Thank you very much. I do appreciate it!

SnowShoeRN

Specializes in Family Medicine, Tele/Cardiac, Camp.

My advice for preparing for this kind of question would be be to study the different arrhythmias and find out what they mean exactly as far as patient outcome is concerned. The rhythms that are precursors to arrest, you would notify immeideatly and prepare to shock whereas those that weren't quite as severe but still concerning you would consider notifying the nurse. Slight changes in baseline would probably require printing it out. Hope that helps and best of luck.

thmpr

Specializes in ED.

What does "prepare to shock if needed" mean to you? When I read that, I visualize a monitor tech holding a defibrillator with the intention of shocking a patient... or me (giggle). Are monitor tech's certified to do direct patient care? :anbd:

In the progress of taking a competency test and posting in a message board for answers? This is isn't a recertification exam this is a competency test for a job she applied for, failure to demonstrate competency = not qualified for the job.

Please tell me you never missed an answer to any question during nursing school and this made you the absolute most competent nurse that ever lived. Please tell me that you know with certainty that you knew every concept on the NCLEX exam and there was nothing on there that you had not heard of before or were familiar with. Please tell me that you did not have to use any decision trees or test taking strategies because you know absolutely everything. Do you think you were 100% competent when you began your nursing career? I highly doubt it and I am 100% sure on this. But did that mean you are/were not a competent nurse? I would think not. Judge not...

The problem is that different abnormal rhythms require different interventions. We can not tell the OP what every single abnormal rhythm is going to require. PP is trying to encourage the OP to learn the material instead of turning to complete strangers on an internet forum for them. It is unfair to expect us to provide a detailed list. Being a tech is serious business and one should be able to pass a basic test given by the employer. If not do some research and learn the material. That isn't being mean. That is helping the OP learn the correct answers so they don't fail a test.

I've never been a monitor tech, but this seems more like a policy question. Maybe check your P&P for some guidance? Good luck :-)

Some obvious advice that is probably insulting:

Asystole: 2 (Notify nurse STAT)

V-Tach: 3 (Notify nurse STAT and prepare to shock)

Did not know you could shock from central monitoring, but again, not my bag.

JustBeachyNurse, RN

Specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics.

Please tell me you never missed an answer to any question during nursing school and this made you the absolute most competent nurse that ever lived. Please tell me that you know with certainty that you knew every concept on the NCLEX exam and there was nothing on there that you had not heard of before or were familiar with. Please tell me that you did not have to use any decision trees or test taking strategies because you know absolutely everything. Do you think you were 100% competent when you began your nursing career? I highly doubt it and I am 100% sure on this. But did that mean you are/were not a competent nurse? I would think not. Judge not...

This is someone who did not pass their competency test for a monitor tech job and was retaking later this week and said "help need answers". There is no way to teach someone on an Internet forum all P&P on how to recognize the various cardiac rhythms as well as response protocol for printing strips vs contacting the nurse.

I've never seen a monitor tech shock a patient, ever.

You are totally misreading. But good luck to you in your studies as a nursing student. If you need decision trees to pass your exams & the NCLEX , then by all means use them.

Edited by JustBeachyNurse

JustBeachyNurse, RN

Specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics.

The problem is that different abnormal rhythms require different interventions. We can not tell the OP what every single abnormal rhythm is going to require. PP is trying to encourage the OP to learn the material instead of turning to complete strangers on an internet forum for them. It is unfair to expect us to provide a detailed list. Being a tech is serious business and one should be able to pass a basic test given by the employer. If not do some research and learn the material. That isn't being mean. That is helping the OP learn the correct answers so they don't fail a test.

Exactly my point.

SnowShoeRN

Specializes in Family Medicine, Tele/Cardiac, Camp.

What does "prepare to shock if needed" mean to you? When I read that, I visualize a monitor tech holding a defibrillator with the intention of shocking a patient... or me (giggle). Are monitor tech's certified to do direct patient care? :anbd:

I don't know if the question's focus is so much geared toward "know when you, as a monitor tech, should be prepared to shock" so much as it's offering a worst-case-scenario-option (illustrating when a rhythm is so bad that it's shockable) in order to test the monitor tech's knowledge base. That is, I read it more as option a) Patient's probably fine but maybe a little ishy so print out a strip. Option b) Patient's looking not-so-hot, let the nurse know asap and Option c) Holy crap, patient's gonna code or actively in the process of coding so let the nurse know super asap so she can get the AED/crash cart.

Though my facility never had monitor techs (the nurses all do their own monitoring), I too doubt monitor techs are involved in codes. Though correct me if I'm wrong.

Edited by SnowShoeRN
grammar

Come on, give the OP a break. S/he is obviously competent (being certified twice) but was just taken by surprise by this type of question. This is certainly not the best resource for answers, but it can't hurt to ask others for input. BTW, do monitor techs shock pts??

×

By using the site you agree to our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies.

OK