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If a co-worker breaks the rules...

Posted

Specializes in hospice, ortho,clinical review. Has 5 years experience.

I've been seeing this question on one of those qualifying surveys that come with applications the choices:

* I get very upset and say something

* I get very upset and say nothing

* I get somewhat upset but let it go

* I don't care if it doesn't affect me personally

* never held a job before

What kind of seriously dumb question is this and what do they want? Frankly none apply because it depends on what it is. If it's stealing narcs that's far different than came back from lunch late. Both are "breaking rules"

I always say the 3rd one but even that one isn't entirely true...I may or may not say something while being calm. But it would take much for me to get *very* upset as the 1st 2 q's. but I'm seriously starting to wonder what are they weeding out with this question. :confused:

Those NCLEX-RN style questions will NEVER GO AWAY! :lol2:

Orange Tree

Specializes in Medical Surgical Orthopedic.

I've been seeing this question on one of those qualifying surveys that come with applications the choices:

* I get very upset and say something

* I get very upset and say nothing

* I get somewhat upset but let it go

* I don't care if it doesn't affect me personally

* never held a job before

What kind of seriously dumb question is this and what do they want? Frankly none apply because it depends on what it is. If it's stealing narcs that's far different than came back from lunch late. Both are "breaking rules"

I always say the 3rd one but even that one isn't entirely true...I may or may not say something while being calm. But it would take much for me to get *very* upset as the 1st 2 q's. but I'm seriously starting to wonder what are they weeding out with this question. :confused:

It's an annoying question, but I think you have to err on the side of caution and assume the "rule" is serious. I've been asked this question in person (interview), and in that case, I answered it the way you did here.

Shanimal

Has 6 years experience.

LOL--I hate these sort of stupid questionnaires where you have to choose between generalized reactions to non-specific scenarios. In fact, I'm often tempted to write in "None of the above" and circle it. :mad:

With those options, it does feel akin to some NCLEX-style questions. Here's how I tend to overanalyze as I read and then pull back.

I get very upset and say something. Hmmm very upset sounds bad, like it could never be a correct answer. But then again, does feeling upset necessarily have any influence on the functional response a nurse has? Say something sounds too general. It could be anything from responsible reporting or gentle reminders to tattling and gossping. Still, it's pro-active, isn't inherently bad, and can be very constructive. If I consider that one's actions are more relevant in this question than actions, I can read this answer as simply 'say something'.

I get very upset and say nothing. 'Say nothing' sounds like it would never be a correct answer. It implies that there is something to say, and one chooses to withhold their words. But that's probably me overanalyzing. 'Say nothing' is functionally the same as 'let it go' - answer choice 3. Once again, I'm thinking perhaps I should read this simply as 'say nothing'.

I get somewhat upset but let it go Let it go is good advice in many situations; unlike say nothing, we rarely use this phrase in regard to things that we *shouldn't* let go off.' That's probably my overthinking it. Again, it's functionally, the same thing as 'say nothing.'

I don't care if it doesn't affect me personally. I don't care doesn't sound like it would ever be a correct answer, but again, does how one feels really matter so long as one 'does the right thing'? At times, it is good to not get involved if something doesn't affect one personnally. But this answer, unlike the first three, doesn't give any information on one's functional response to a situation.

Never held a job before. Answering with that one may be accurate, but it certainly doesn't seem like a good answer on a 'qualifying survey' as it does nothing to further the potential employers' assessment of what you have to offer as an employee.

Answering such questions isn't a clear matter of correct or incorrect. Given the vagueness of the question and answers, it's sort of like trying to follow a recipe without any objective quantities, just more imprecise terms like 'a handful', 'a pinch', etc. Despite the lack of ability to follow the recipe 'perfectly', you can still probably do well enough.

i.hate.psych. and that is what this is.......i would have to write in "no applicable answer"....

MaxAttack

Specializes in Trauma/Surgical & Neuro Critical Care. Has 5 years experience.

Lol I love psych, but they can be incredibly naive. I always found it rather stupid to try and condense the range of human personality and emotion into a scale that you can test for. This question is a prime example of why it simply does not work. As jjoy points out, there's room for debate for each answer, and the validity of your response is left in the hands of the opinion and reasoning of the psychologist who wrote the test, not your own.

When you're dealing with a person you can clarify, or on a paper application you can make notes that all 4 (or 5 choices) are bad, unclear, or vague.

The problem is the question is on a computerized application and IF I were the hiring manager I wouldn't hire ANYBODY who answered A, B, C, or D, and E only if it were an entry level job.

I HATE THIS QUESTION!

Edited by msgates1964
just cleaning up the grammar, clarifying