Jump to content

ICU: Finding the Best Way to Care

MICU Article   (12,119 Views | 20 Replies | 1,216 Words)

Liddle Noodnik has 30 years experience and specializes in Alzheimer's, Geriatrics, Chem. Dep..

4 Articles; 42,836 Profile Views; 3,789 Posts

A new nurse struggles to find her niche, and becomes an ICU nurse, quite by accident. What was it that made it even possible for a nurse who was scared to death to confront a possible emergency on the regular floors? What was it that made it her great love? Being able to focus on one, maybe two, patients at a time, knowing each person inside and out, was so satisfying, and provided this nurse with an ability to provide the best quality of care - in the Intensive Care Unit. You are reading page 2 of ICU: Finding the Best Way to Care. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Sun0408 has 4 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Trauma Surgical ICU.

1,761 Posts; 36,166 Profile Views

Great,

help full thing, everyone benefited to read this.

Body By Vi

Where can we report this, this is advertisement !!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

35 Posts; 3,027 Profile Views

Great article! Ah! My dream job! I worked as an ICU Tech for a year and a half while in Nursing School, then landed my first full-time RN job at a crazy busy Med-Surg floor. With up to 7 patients as a new nurse, I can't even remember my patients' first names off the top of my head, let alone their medical issues or their latest vitals. If I had the time, I would read through each patient's chart and medical history to understand the pathophysiology of their illnesses. I would take the time to TEACH my patients and families about their condition. I would love to know the ins-and -outs of my patients. I would love to work as an ICU nurse some day....

I'm only 5 months into my nursing career. Believe me, I have very much to learn still, but could any of you offer any advice for a path to ICU RN for me?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

91 Posts; 2,794 Profile Views

Great article! Ah! My dream job! I worked as an ICU Tech for a year and a half while in Nursing School, then landed my first full-time RN job at a crazy busy Med-Surg floor. With up to 7 patients as a new nurse, I can't even remember my patients' first names off the top of my head, let alone their medical issues or their latest vitals. If I had the time, I would read through each patient's chart and medical history to understand the pathophysiology of their illnesses. I would take the time to TEACH my patients and families about their condition. I would love to know the ins-and -outs of my patients. I would love to work as an ICU nurse some day....

I'm only 5 months into my nursing career. Believe me, I have very much to learn still, but could any of you offer any advice for a path to ICU RN for me?

I would recommend talking with the ICU/CCU director/clinical coordinator regarding transfer to the department. As a Critical Care Tech for almost 9 years now and also a nursing student (graduate may 2014) I've already inquired about working in the dept and I've been told that I would have to work on telemetry for about 6 months then transfer to IMCU for a few months and then I can transfer to CCU, all within a year. Good luck and best wishes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ninzi has 5 years experience and specializes in Medical surgical oncology.

1 Post; 525 Profile Views

Well written :) keep up the good work!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Liddle Noodnik has 30 years experience and specializes in Alzheimer's, Geriatrics, Chem. Dep..

4 Articles; 3,789 Posts; 42,836 Profile Views

Where can we report this, this is advertisement !!!!!

It looks like someone reported it, thanks Sun!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BrandonB779 has 4 years experience and specializes in TNCC, PALS, NRP, ACLS, BLS-Instructor.

25 Posts; 2,209 Profile Views

This is just awesome, I went from a volunteer EMT to brand new grad in our Medical/Cardiac ICU straight out of school, and I can mirror many of these feelings.....beautifully written!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

18 Posts; 1,390 Profile Views

This was a great article. I worked the floors for four years. I worked in General Surgery, medicine, and oncoloy. I had 11 patients at one point on the general surgery floor. I had a manager who demanded report from each night nurse individually. One morning I told her, "I am sorry. I cannot give you report because I do not know any of these patients." Floor nursing is great in a sense because it is very important. Floor nurses are treated terribly because we are portrayed as glorified waitresses and "pill givers" since the patients are "stable." IF they were stable, they'd be home. 11 patients consists of a patient on a heparin drip, a patient with blood transfusing, a patient with constant bladder irrigation, a patient on PCA morphine, a patient on IV antibiotics with tube feedings, a patient who is trached with need for constant suctioning, a patient post op with a fresh below the knee amputation, a confused patient who wants to jump over the hand rails, a patient on Ativan/ CIWA protocol who is in alcohol withdrawl, and the list is endless. For extra fun, a patient could code or decompensate and need to be transferred to the ICU or to the morgue! We also cannot forget admissions, discharges, and transfers.

I now work in ICU because I was bored on the floors even though I loved patient care. I also despised nursing administration as they have ZERO reguard for the hard work that floor nurses do. Even the public think that floor nurses aren't as "skilled" as ICU nurses. I remember floating to the floor from the ICU and I was assigned a patient that I had in the ICU that was trasferred to the floor. The patient's husband asked me, "I thought you were an ICU nurse. I thought you were higher than here." ICU nurses are notr superior to floor nurses. Having two patients and being in control is outstanding in the ICU but it is a different setting than the floor. Ask any ICU nurse and they will never go to the floor because the patient load is overwhelming as people who are hospitalized these days are indeed very sick. Outpatient procedures are more common today than 20 years ago because of the advances in medicine.

Nursing is rewarding, backbreaking, exhausting, and amazing all at the same time. The minute you hate it, you have to leave!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

aharrellRN specializes in Emergency Medicine.

7 Posts; 1,059 Profile Views

Liddle ... a very inspiring account of passionate discovery ... hope my experience is similar as I soon will be starting the Critical Care journey.

... Alan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

7 Posts; 625 Profile Views

I am so glad you posted this because I want to work as an ICU nurse once I graduate. However I was afraid of all the things I might have to do and all the responsibilities to come upon me. But you make it sound so rewarding and completely worth it. Basically, you made me sure of going into ICU nursing. Thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.