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I want to become a RN/LPN but confused

nhanu399 nhanu399 (New) New

I want to go to school to become an RN. I currently am at a dead end job and as a single parent with 2 children, it is difficult.

I was checking out different schools and this tech school has a 1 yr program where you go to school from around 8am to 2pm and get your LPN cert.

I was wondering, should I do this to get more money in the meantime and then go to school for RN? Im wondering if I am just "licensed" in LPN does this help any to become an RN in less time?

AdvicE?

Bree124, BSN, RN

Specializes in L&D.

Once you are an LPN, you can do a bridge program to become an RN. I don't think it would save you any time to do LPN then RN rather than just starting from scratch and becoming an RN.

One advantage of doing the LPN-RN route would be that you could work as an LPN while finishing your RN, but I don't know if you would have time for that since you are a single mom.

Good luck! Hopefully someone will have more advice or information for you.

lllchillylll

Specializes in ltc, rehab. Has 2 years experience.

There are transitional programs out there that offer a "LPN to RN" bridge program. Instead of doing the traditional curriculum you bypass a few things so it allows you to get your RN license quicker. However, if you take into account the time you also had to do for the LPN school, its a bit longer. I have my LPN license and I am currently going for my BSN . I can honestly say that if it wasnt for my LPN license, there is no way I could be able to pay for school for the RN program with out dying from exhaustion. Its a good way to make a good amount of money to help pay for school.

Have you considered doing an ADN as well, that is a 2 year's associate in Nursing, the pay difference isn't that much, i think in most states it's maybe a dollar difference at best, I think the ADN is more generalized though, and I know you would have certain restrictions far as the job verses if you had a BSN, also after the 2 years associate , many colleges also have a bridge program, from ADN to BSN, I think LPN would be good too if you need the job immediately, since most programs for LPN are about a year long

Have you considered doing an ADN as well, that is a 2 year's associate in Nursing, the pay difference isn't that much, i think in most states it's maybe a dollar difference at best, I think the ADN is more generalized though, and I know you would have certain restrictions far as the job verses if you had a BSN, also after the 2 years associate , many colleges also have a bridge program, from ADN to BSN, I think LPN would be good too if you need the job immediately, since most programs for LPN are about a year long

hm, i havent. im just trying to figure out what is best for me and my family in the long run.....but i do need some sort of good job in the next few yrs. im already almost 26 years old and hate that i waited this long!

There are transitional programs out there that offer a "LPN to RN" bridge program. Instead of doing the traditional curriculum you bypass a few things so it allows you to get your RN license quicker. However, if you take into account the time you also had to do for the LPN school, its a bit longer. I have my LPN license and I am currently going for my BSN . I can honestly say that if it wasnt for my LPN license, there is no way I could be able to pay for school for the RN program with out dying from exhaustion. Its a good way to make a good amount of money to help pay for school.

how many things do you bypass? is it worth it? :)

chevyv, BSN, RN

Specializes in Gero Psych, Ortho Rebab, LTC, Psych. Has 20 years experience.

I did the lpn to rn route through my local tech college. Many 2 yr colleges are now offering their students a choice to stop at the lpn level, continue on to the adn level or test at lpn and continue on. I tested and continued on. I was able to get very comfortable passing meds and also learned (and still am learning) time management. I have never regretted going for lpn first. You get your hands on pts, get to know some meds, and learn the ropes a bit easier.

I was a cna first and forgot until nursing school that comfort level just touching another human being in ways you normally wouldn't touch a stranger. Bathing a patient is just part of my day, but when you first start, it's not always a natural type feeling. If you can afford to go the lpn route and it won't hold you back too much, I'd say go for it and good luck!

Hi, Please check out this other thread that has similar questions/answers.

https://allnurses.com/general-nursing-discussion/can-someone-pls-436423.html

One thing you need to keep in mind, if it is a tech school you are considering for LPN - do you earn credit hours that will transfer to an RN bridge program? We have a tech school here in MO that you can get your LPN in about 12 months, but if you decided to bridge you would have to take all prereqs - A&P I & II are an example - because at the tech school it is taught as part of the program but you don't earn college credits. The community colleges here that have LPN programs your credits transfer to bridge programs and are about 14 months in length.

Good luck in your choice! You have found a great place to find answers - you might also check under the student section, and regionally under you area to get advice on programs.

Callisonanne

Specializes in Psych.

I am currently in an ADN program and we have 3 or 4 students in there that are LPN's. Most of them have children and that was the reason they did LPN first. I would go talk to the schools in your area. They can give you a good idea on the time requirements and also how the programs transfer into each other. Most of the ADN programs in my area require that you are a CNA unless you are an LPN. I don't remember if you mentioned being a CNA so you'd have to check on that as well. Also if you go talk to the program faculty they can direct you to counseling on campus or to a former or current student that is doing the same type of thing. Either way good luck with it. Just make sure that if you want to be a nurse then you just go for it. There are also a few girls in our program who actually got more money from financial aid than they did from working. You'd have to check on that and also on scholarships :)