Jump to content

I want to anticipate needs...but I am also scared....

Emergency   (2,392 Views 11 Comments)
by PinkRocksLikeMe PinkRocksLikeMe (Member) Member

3,731 Profile Views; 122 Posts

Hey guys,

I am almost done with my pre-reqs and headed to the ADN program soon enough. I have been an EMT-I since 2007 and I have worked at a county jail and the local EMS service. I just got a position as a ED Tech and I am very excited BUT I am very nervous. This is a somewhat large ED Level 2 and I want to be able to anticipate the nurses needs. I am wondering how it is going to all flow with some many personalities and so many needs. I have had a lot of patients we brought in via EMS and have seen a small fraction of what is on "the other side" so to speak. I am nervous about have NO peds experience and have never started an IV on a pediatric patient to boot.:uhoh3:

I am sorry I am rambling, I am just very nervous and would very much appreciate some feedbacks from you great nurses and the techs out there as well. What can I do to make my job a success and to take some load of you nurses? I appreciate the feedback in advance.

Jenn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

17 Posts; 1,165 Profile Views

I am a tech also with my EMT-I and I think the best "training" I've received is by asking a good nurse or two if I could help them with procedures or let me do them with their guidance. You'll very quickly see who you want to approach for this, but in my experience, most understand this quite well as they've been nervous about this at one time too.

As for pediatric sticks, I know nurses who avoid doing it; so don't feel bad. It's all about getting in there and doing it though. Again, ask someone to 'stand by' to help you get used to it. The best way here is to look for a peds Pt. who's parents don't want to be in the room. :-) Ask the nurses to look out for this as well; they'll probably be the first to know anyhow.

Also, most nurses know the EMS world is very different to the much more controlled hospital environment and will likely help you get situated.

In the mean time, get orientated to your floor and watch everyone, you'll get a feel for things soon enough and can start anticipating needs. Also realize, you cannot do everything for everyone, but you will of course try to do just that!

Good luck and congrats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

24 Posts; 1,571 Profile Views

I was an EMT-B before nursing school and also was a tech in the ER my senior year. Some nurses you can anticipate their needs and there are others that you may as well wait until they tell you (I will leave it at that lol). But just set your priorities in line as if you were in the ambo. Keep the rooms well stocked. I worked with some techs that drove me crazy on stocking. Some would make sure you had all the washcloths in the world but didn't seem to care about suction or an ambu bag. The hardest thing for me to learn was to say "I'm busy". We were often very short handed, and I hated to tell anyone no, but when I was the only tech on the floor it was definitely more important that I was running for the difficult intubation kit and getting ready to get tied up in a code than to go do a stat catheter.

Just think about things. If you have a stroke pt coming in, get the glucometer ready. OB case, make sure there is a gyno bed in the receiving room. Another big thing I tried to do was take some of the "heat" off the nurses. When I answered a call bell and they said they wanted their nurse, I made it a point to ask specifically what they wanted, especially when we were busy. There are alot of things we can do for them that they think they need their nurse for. I was also perfectly capable of telling them we were still waiting on labs or xrays. That is also a good way to calm them down when waiting, the Doc can't tell them anything without test results so that is why he hasn't been in yet etc. And in a pinch I could run and ask their nurse if they could eat/drink and get them something or tell them no. Just remember that most ED pts aren't allowed to eat/drink but yet they are all starving when they arrive lol.

Good luck, you will do fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

3,408 Posts; 29,234 Profile Views

Congrats and good luck on the new position. Why in the world would you be starting an IV if you are a tech?

Our techs do IV s all the time. It's one of their main functions.

To the OP just be willing to learn and ready to work. You'll learn what the expectations are and how you find your assignment and how tasks are delegated. Start on bigger kids and work younger from there (never lie about pain or what you're doing with a kid).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Footballnut has 45 years experience and specializes in CAPA RN, ED RN.

158 Posts; 2,598 Profile Views

You will do great. You should have an orientation and you will have many of your questions answered with that. The orientation will also help you define your role. True, you will not be able to do everything for everyone but if you are willing to help as much as you can and you smile about it that counts for a lot.

Even the little things help. For example, just having someone noticing that pts are back in the ED from a diagnostic test elsewhere and hooking them back up to the monitor is a huge help. I'm usually in the middle of five other things and it often takes a few minutes for me even though I know the pt is there.

This job sounds like an exciting step for you in your journey. What a great experience for you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pixie.RN has 11 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

7 Followers; 32 Articles; 13,239 Posts; 128,478 Profile Views

I was an ED tech for nearly 4 years before I became an RN in the same ED. As a side note, I came into my tech job as a paramedic, but all of our techs were expected to start IVs regardless of background; a few of our techs have had zero EMS or IV experience.

Anyway ... as long as you are eager to work, you will do just fine. The RNs were always happy to instruct, and I got very proficient in anticipating what needed to be done, and just doing it. And honestly, once I became an RN, I truly realized the value of a good tech who anticipated patient needs!! Heck, I thought I was just doing my tech job. LOL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×