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HS Grad, looking forward to becoming a Neonatal Nurse

NICU   (1,233 Views | 4 Replies)
by Betchaaa Betchaaa (New) New

482 Profile Views; 1 Post

Hello everyone. I am new to this site and I'm looking for any tips, pros/cons, advice!

Im a recent graduate of HS, ( JULY2014 ) and I have my own baby! Ever since I had my own child, I instantly knew what I wanted to spend the rest of my life doing!

if you do have the time, I'd really appreciate if you could answer some questions.. So I know I'm 100% sure this what I'll be dedicating myself to.

What are some of your pros/cons about this job?

Ive ve heard this is a on Call job and mostly 12+ hour shifts. Is this true? I'm looking for a 8 hour shifts maximum.

Whats the process, as in what requirements are necessary?

What was your starting salary?

How many many years of college did it take?

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1 Article; 1,068 Posts; 24,911 Profile Views

I'll bite and answer the few questions that I can.

First off, you might try to shadow a NICU/Neonatal Nurse to ensure that is truly what you want to do. Sometimes people do not realize what all goes into nursing or they don't realize exactly what it is like to work in that specialty. I would try to contact some hospitals around you esp. teaching hospitals to see if they would let you do that.

Next, it depends on where you work on what types of shift you will get. Some facilities have 8 hour shifts some have 12s.

To be a NICU/Neonatal Nurse you will have to first become an RN (or LPN). Meaning you would have to go through an accredited Diploma, ADN, or BSN program and then take and pass NCLEX. Gain some experience and then enter your specialty (unless you are lucky enough to get into your dream specialty right away).

The amount of time your education takes depends on the type of program that you are in and also your own personal pace. (How long it takes to do pre-reqs, whether you go to school FT or PT, etc). Diploma/ADN may take 2years+, BSN is a 4 year program, usually.

I would look into schools in your area to see what their admission requirements are. Nursing is a competitive major so I would start looking now so that you can get your pre-reqs in order and everything.

Good luck finding your way to your dream job and good luck with your little one!

Also, just a friendly tip, I would change your avatar to a more anonymous picture. :yes:

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HazelLPN has 54 years experience as a LPN and specializes in Adult ICU/PICU/NICU.

489 Posts; 18,064 Profile Views

I'm going to add a few things. As an LPN myself, I would urge you to get your RN. In my day, LPNs worked anywhere in the hospital. These days, most of the LPNs who work the NICU have been there for some years and it is rare for an NICU to hire a new graduate LPN. I'm not saying it can't happen, but its the exception to the rule. Many facilities are only hiring nurses who have a BSN...which is a 4 year degree. That is going to give you the most options in your career. You may decide that bedside nursing isn't your thing after some years and want to go into administration or become an advanced practice nurse....that BSN will help you get there. Your best bet is your local state school or community college, they are the most affordable. Non profit private schools can be good options too, but they tend to be pricey...although some of the best nursing programs in my area are private non profit schools. AVOID the for profit schools. They are extremely expensive with low graduation rates and have questionable credentials.

Do your homework before selecting a school of nursing. Visit the school. Talk to the faculty, admissions office and the students themselves.

Best to you,

Mrs H.

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LadyFree28 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma.

8,427 Posts; 76,097 Profile Views

I'm going to add a few things. As an LPN myself, I would urge you to get your RN. In my day, LPNs worked anywhere in the hospital. These days, most of the LPNs who work the NICU have been there for some years and it is rare for an NICU to hire a new graduate LPN. I'm not saying it can't happen, but its the exception to the rule. Many facilities are only hiring nurses who have a BSN...which is a 4 year degree. That is going to give you the most options in your career. You may decide that bedside nursing isn't your thing after some years and want to go into administration or become an advanced practice nurse....that BSN will help you get there. Your best bet is your local state school or community college, they are the most affordable. Non profit private schools can be good options too, but they tend to be pricey...although some of the best nursing programs in my area are private non profit schools. AVOID the for profit schools. They are extremely expensive with low graduation rates and have questionable credentials.

Do your homework before selecting a school of nursing. Visit the school. Talk to the faculty, admissions office and the students themselves.

Best to you,

Mrs H.

This.

You have some really good advice; you have some researching to do-in your area, and on AN as well.

Make an appointment with your local CC; also find out what universities that may have agreements with your local CC so you can transfer into a BSN program. Make sure your are adamant about getting your BSN.

Keep us posted!

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