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How long should I wait before contacting?

Posted

Specializes in ICU and agency (per diem). Has 4 years experience.

At the beginning of December I applied for some vacancies with a top Vancouver health authority. I had a prescreening telephone interview on the 17th December that went very well. So well that she said that the manager at the hospital would be very happy to have me on their team. She said that I would have to do 2 online training courses that they would pay for, I would have to give her monthly updates on the CRNBC, she would pass me on to the manager of the ward and request my references.

My references were all received on the 28th of December and she said she would pass them onto the manager who was back to work on the 2nd Jan and she wished me luck.

I have not heard anything yet. How long should I leave it before emailing/phoning? Should I at all?

In Scotland generally if you request someones references it is if you are serious about giving them a job. Is it the same in Canada or do you just think they did it to not waste the managers time??

I understand what you are going through. I applied with VHA and nothing really materialised. Applied with Fraser health and had a face to face interview at the nursevancouver thing in London and they promised to arrange a phone interview with the hiring department. Never heard anything. I did get a private hospital that still asks me if I would like to work for them in BC. However, I did get a job in Alberta and the interview with the hiring dept took place 4 Dec, all went well and they informed me that they would like me to start as soon as and the aim was for February therefore, they are going to sent out my paperwork as soon as possible. Its over a month and I am still waiting. Its extremely frustrating and difficult to plan things as there is no word from them. I get the feeling that things move a lot slower in canada than here. It would be good if at least they could let one know via a small email message if there is a reason for the delay. I am planning on phoning them and check otherwise i may have to do some serious thinking.

So you are not alone. there is also another girl I know who is in the same position.

Hope this provides some comfort knowing that its probably the way things are done in canada...which is worrying

NotReady4PrimeTime, RN

Specializes in NICU, PICU, PCVICU and peds oncology. Has 25 years experience.

Nothing moves quickly over here, even given the desperate shortage some regions are experiencing. Simple transfers between departments take several weeks. A friend was offered a full time position in an inner-city CCU, but preferred a part-time spot that opened up a couple of weeks later. She applied, then waited four weeks to hear back about whether she'd get the position or not... and she was working as a casual in the CCU at the time, right there, in the room! Last year at this time I applied for a casual position in my local community hospital. I had an interview on February 13, and didn't hear anything about whether I'd gotten the job or not until the 18th of March.

There are so many layers of bureaucracy resulting in so many hands touching EVERY single piece of paper in the health regions it would boggle your mind. I wouldn't be surprised if you hear back in February that you're being offered a job. Managers here don't typically bother contacting references unless they're interested in you. In the Capital Health region in Alberta, managers have a checklist they have to follow for every hire, which includes speaking with the person's current supervisor, whether the applicant has included that person as a reference or not. (I have a friend in management in another department who shares this kind of info with me... and I see much more of my friend socially than I do of my own patient care manager, even though I work 70% FTE.) So if you're really wanting to come over here to work, be patient. They eventually will get back to you.

Hi, I'm new to the forum, and have 100% decided to apply to Canada first when I pass my NCLEX. I haven't seen a specific answer to this question: in which province would there be the fastest hire?:specs: And if it's Alberta or Saskatchewan, how could you (or could you?) overcome the lack of housing?

Thanks,

RGN1

Specializes in med/surg.

I assume you have to pass N-CLEX to become an RN 1st in your country because it's the CRNE you need to pass to become an RN in Canada.

All Provinces will take some time to process your credentials etc. Alberta College quotes a 6 month max on their website, for example.

Then you will still need your work permits/visia etc etc.

All provinces have excellent web sites for you to peruse & gather info from.

Fiona59

Has 18 years experience.

Want to hear time lines. VIHA, I applied for a job at the end of September 2004, was interviewed (had to travel at my expense) in March 2005, and was offered the job in July 2005, which I turned down as my family had decided to leave BC by that point.

BC's health authorities bring new meaning to "snails pace"

Hi,

I was in the same situation as you. Got tired of waiting on a reply from Providence Health and VCH. I applied to VIHA and got the job. Awaiting work permit and hoping to be in VI in April-May. No time wasting with VIHA, the whole process took about six month including Nurse Registration...hurray to VIHA:up::balloons::bowingpur:nurse::monkeydance::yelclap:

NotReady4PrimeTime, RN

Specializes in NICU, PICU, PCVICU and peds oncology. Has 25 years experience.

Hi, I'm new to the forum, and have 100% decided to apply to Canada first when I pass my NCLEX. I haven't seen a specific answer to this question: in which province would there be the fastest hire?:specs: And if it's Alberta or Saskatchewan, how could you (or could you?) overcome the lack of housing?

Thanks,

RGN1, it is a requirement that a person be licensed in their country of origin before they can be licensed in Canada. I wondered if anyone would catch that.

Rad Student, your question about housing is a very pertinent one. In the urban areas of both Alberta and more recently Saskatchewan, affordable housing is in very short supply. Unless one is moving from an area with higher housing prices and has property to sell there, it will be very hard to find a place to live. In the Edmonton area real estate prices have softened slightly in the last few months but are expected to surge again once the weather warms up. In Calgary and Fort McMurray there has been no slump at all. As for rentals, vacancy rates are really low and rent is really high and continually climbing with no rent controls in place. It isn't unusual to see stories in the paper talking about rent increases of 60% or more. Saskatoon and Regina have followed the pack, although not quite as bad yet as in Alberta. Rural areas are really no better. There are even fewer vacancies and as people have moved farther out, real estate costs have skyrocketed much in the way that the Greater Toronto or Vancouver Areas did a decade ago. A friend recently moved back to Canada from Texas and had a terrible time finding a home she could afford, even though she was willing to live an hour out of Edmonton. All that said, I'm not sure what advice to give you about finding housing. Sorry.

RGN1

Specializes in med/surg.

RGN1, it is a requirement that a person be licensed in their country of origin before they can be licensed in Canada. I wondered if anyone would catch that.

I just wanted to clarify matters for others reading this thread (you know how many posts there have been already where nurses think that N-CLEX is the be all & end all!) I just wanted to ensure that no-one was going to be thinking that N-CLEX meant they could automatically become a Registered Nurse in Canada.

:cheers:

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