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How Can I Boost my Resume ?

HI,

I'm a senior Nursing student and I will be applying for my first job on December 2nd! I want to boost my resume and was wondering if you had any tips. I'm renewing my BLS but since I want to go into Peds/NICU or Mother/Baby, I was thinking of getting my PALS. I want to try and get some volunteering hours this semester in preparation for applying but from you guys (other students and Registered Nurses), do you have any advice for other things I could add to my resume?

Thank you so much!

NICU Guy, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU.

3 hours ago, samanthacanelaa said:

I will be applying for my first job on December 2nd!

What is the significance of Dec 2nd?

Getting a part-time job at the hospital you want to work at will help you get a job after graduation. PALS and NRP may not help you, but will not hurt you. You will get PALS after being hired for a peds job and you will be put through NRP if you get a job in L&D or NICU.

MotoMonkey, BSN, RN

Specializes in ED.

One tip I would give to "boost" your resume would be to have a trusted instructor or someone in your college writing center look over your resume before you use it for any job. Having a polished, grammar free, well formatted, and professional looking resume will go far. Ask your instructors what your local job market expects on the resume of a new grad. I know that my new grad resume was very different from any other resume I had written because hospitals around me are interested in seeing what clinical placements new grads have had in addition to things like previous relevant work experience and applicable certifications.

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

I don't think the PALS and NRP will help you much. Without the experience to back them up, you won't be prepared to function in those roles after just taking the course.

A better use of your time would be volunteering. Anything you can do to get yourself into the hospital of your choice will help. If you get a chance while you are volunteering, introduce yourself to the manager and/or educator of the units that interest you.

If you can't volunteer, get any experience you can working with children - in any capacity. Show an interest in children/babies and get experience working with other people's children.

Finally, if you get a chance ... focus any school projects on children/babies. You will then be able to add those projects to your resume and to your interview conversation.

Also, no past experience is useless. The actual job application usually asks for a chronological work history, so focus your resume on relevant work history. And what you're doing is highlighting where your job role or responsibilities will translate into being useful as a nurse. An example is someone who worked on the grill at a burger place had to multitask and watch the temperature of a bunch of burgers all at the same time to cook them how the person wants them made, know when to put burgers onto the grill so an whole order comes out at the same time. How is that really any different of a skill than a nurse planning a scheduled med pass on 10 patients?

18 hours ago, NICU Guy said:

What is the significance of Dec 2nd?

Getting a part-time job at the hospital you want to work at will help you get a job after graduation. PALS and NRP may not help you, but will not hurt you. You will get PALS after being hired for a peds job and you will be put through NRP if you get a job in L&D or NICU.

I already worked for 2.5 yrs as a CNA - do you think I should look for jobs they have at the hospital Im applying to? And thats just the day I apply/it opens (I remember it because its my sisters birthday )

2 hours ago, TheDudeWithTheBigDog said:

Also, no past experience is useless. The actual job application usually asks for a chronological work history, so focus your resume on relevant work history. And what you're doing is highlighting where your job role or responsibilities will translate into being useful as a nurse. An example is someone who worked on the grill at a burger place had to multitask and watch the temperature of a bunch of burgers all at the same time to cook them how the person wants them made, know when to put burgers onto the grill so an whole order comes out at the same time. How is that really any different of a skill than a nurse planning a scheduled med pass on 10 patients?

Thank you!

2 hours ago, llg said:

I don't think the PALS and NRP will help you much. Without the experience to back them up, you won't be prepared to function in those roles after just taking the course.

A better use of your time would be volunteering. Anything you can do to get yourself into the hospital of your choice will help. If you get a chance while you are volunteering, introduce yourself to the manager and/or educator of the units that interest you.

If you can't volunteer, get any experience you can working with children - in any capacity. Show an interest in children/babies and get experience working with other people's children.

Finally, if you get a chance ... focus any school projects on children/babies. You will then be able to add those projects to your resume and to your interview conversation.

Okay I was considering doing pediatric home care as a CNA but I would rather start off in a hospital setting... I’ll see what other jobs they have to offer

17 hours ago, MotoMonkey said:

One tip I would give to "boost" your resume would be to have a trusted instructor or someone in your college writing center look over your resume before you use it for any job. Having a polished, grammar free, well formatted, and professional looking resume will go far. Ask your instructors what your local job market expects on the resume of a new grad. I know that my new grad resume was very different from any other resume I had written because hospitals around me are interested in seeing what clinical placements new grads have had in addition to things like previous relevant work experience and applicable certifications.

Thank you!

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