Hep B

Posted
by sheilav sheilav (New) New

I was asked to give the Hep B and Dtap vaccine to any new employee requesting it

I am not comfortable with this, should I have reason to object to doing this.

CRNA1982

CRNA1982

Specializes in Anesthesia. 97 Posts

Why are you not comfortable with giving a vaccine?

sheilav

sheilav

3 Posts

I have no history on any of these future employees, and would be afraid that someone

may have some kind of reaction, and I'd be held responsible for giving it.

CRNA1982

CRNA1982

Specializes in Anesthesia. 97 Posts

With a little research I'm sure that you could find out who should not receive the vaccine. Certain vaccines contain eggs or other ingredients that people may be sensitive to. I would imagine that there would be a form that employees would have to sign as well as information about the vaccine that would be provided to you and employee? Such as, "Do you have an allergy to 1, 2, 3 etc.....Then you should not receive the vaccine because said ingredients are contained in the injection." Does your employer have something like that for you?

Chin up

Chin up

Specializes in Med surg, LTC, Administration. Has 26 years experience. 694 Posts

There is a waiver every employee should read before receiving the vaccine. Once signed by the employee, you are protected. Just make sure, they really do understand what they are getting and the risk involved. This will protect both you and the employee as well as the facility.

neuroms

neuroms

150 Posts

No reason you, as an RN, should not be competent in giving immunizations.

NPinWCH

NPinWCH

Specializes in Family NP, OB Nursing. Has 15 years experience. 374 Posts

Review allergies and any prior reaction to vaccinations with them prior to administration, make sure there is a signed consent and you should be fine. I don't always have complete histories on patients and order vaccines. The health department patients just show up, ask for vaccines, and the RNs there follow the steps above. There isn't much history.

Your responsibility is to recognize any reaction if one does happen and then to follow the proper steps at that point. A patient could always have an unexpected reaction to any medication/vaccine given, even if they had it before. I don't see the difference between vaccines and any other treatment medication you'd give. Follow policy.

JaneyW

JaneyW

Specializes in Perinatal, Education. Has 9 years experience. 640 Posts

Unless you are hiring pediatric employees, it is the Tdap. Do some homework. These vaccinations are really important for people working in healthcare. In CA, RNs can give immunizations independently--no MD order needed in the community setting. This is well within your scope I am sure.