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Nurses   (2,889 Views | 14 Replies)

1,543 Profile Views; 59 Posts

Ok I have this Anatomy and Physiology II take home test and I am down to my last question. I have no clue where to begin because my answer is squashed by my teacher when I finished reading the question.... Please Help it's due tomorrow!

Physiologically speaking, why is there such an increase of STD's in adolecents (especially females)...the answer is not that the have sexual intercourse!

:o Help...

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76 Posts; 3,307 Profile Views

Ok, so the prof said it is not related to sexual intercourse, so what about oral sex? Since many schools bombard students about intercourse being the route of STD's and pregnancy. They must think if they have oral sex they are safe..... my guess only

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212 Posts; 3,675 Profile Views

I agree with the oral sex issue. Many teenagers do not look at oral sex as being sexual and do not believe that the can get STD's that way. They will not be using condoms with oral sex either so they can get STDs in that way. Also, they also think that anal sex is safe against pregnancy and do not look at the risk of STD's in that manner. Good luck, I hope the info helps.

I have a 13 year old son, so I speak from experience as well as being a nurse!! :uhoh3:

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boggle is a ASN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg.

393 Posts; 6,059 Profile Views

I see what the other posters are saying, but is that a Physiological reason the teens have more STDs? It's a behavioral issue for sure. I'm not quite sure what your instructor is getting at with the physiological aspect.

Physiological makes me think about anatomy, physical development, body fluids, immunity. I'm stuck for an answer for you. Sorry, wish I could help.

Please post the answer for us after your test comes back. You have us curious.

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boggle is a ASN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg.

393 Posts; 6,059 Profile Views

Just had another thought. Could hightened levels of hormones have anything to do with the increase in sexual encounters? Combine this with the risk taking behaviors of teens. Is the risk taking behavior also a result of physiology- brain development and hormone levels too?

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59 Posts; 1,543 Profile Views

females are more susceptible to many stds than are males because they have a larger surface susceptible to infection (the lining of the vagina) than males (the lining of the urethra). mucous membranes provide an easier route of entry for most stds than intact skin. in addition, adolescent females are at higher risk of certain stds than are adult women, due to anatomical differences of the uterine cervix associated with age. these factors decrease condom effectiveness due to the increased susceptibility of the individual. in addition, women suffer more of the severe complications of stds than men do (e.g., cervical cancer, infertility).

most people infected with an std do not know it. for example, a study of adolescent females who had one or more of six stds studied (genital herpes, chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, hepatitis b, trichomoniasis) showed that 87 percent had no symptoms.

this is what i used for my answer plus what yall said about anal and oral sex...

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QuilterLPN has 6 years experience.

105 Posts; 2,130 Profile Views

One thing my teacher addressed (in nursing, not A&P, thought), was the increased availability of oral contraceptives. So that if a young woman is using the pill, why bother with a condom? Also, changes in acceptance of teenage sexuality may make them more likely to engage in sex at younger ages.

just what my teacher said...

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86 Posts; 2,535 Profile Views

In younger females the cervix is more susceptible to infection. As you age the cervix becomes tougher (not a clinical term) and is less susceptible.

Physiologically speaking, why is there such an increase of STD's in adolecents (especially females)...the answer is not that the have sexual intercourse!

:o Help...

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NurseyBaby'05 is a BSN, RN and specializes in Neuro/Med-Surg/Oncology.

1,110 Posts; 12,993 Profile Views

physiologically speaking, kids (girls in particular) are going through puberty at younger and younger ages.

so . . . from a numbers standpoint there are more people going through puberty to catch and share std's than there were before. also, i saw on my yahoo search (onset of puberty) a lot of articles making a link between the increase in childhood obesity with the increase of early onset of puberty. that could be the physiology angle he/she is trying to work as well. what are you stydying now in a&p>

http://www.freep.com/news/childrenfirst/girls16_20011016.htm

http://www.applesforhealth.com/childrenshealth/onpube2.html

there is research evidence that early puberty may put young girls at risk for emotional and social problems that could be devastating. maturing young girls will have to cope with their own confusing sexual feelings as well as the impact that their maturing appearance has on boys and men. research indicates that girls with early menarche face consequences as young girls and as teenagers. studies of young girls indicate that those who develop early are more likely to be depressed, aggressive, socially withdrawn, and moody (sonis, et al., 1985). studies of teens indicate that girls who developed early are more likely to be sexually active, have more problems in school, and are more likely to smoke and use alcohol and drugs (phinney, et al., 1990; ge, et al., 1996; graber, et al., 1997).

http://www.center4policy.org/children11.html

there is tons more on this topic. hope this did not get to you late. please let us know the answer your prof. was driving at. you have really piqued my curiousity.

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