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Michigan   (606 Views 5 Comments)
by smileyface36 smileyface36 (New Member) New Member

477 Profile Views; 2 Posts

Hello to everyone out their. I am not a nurse as of yet I am facing some decisions before I register. I have just received my Associates degree for Science and now I want to do the LPN or the RN. I need to know the difference between the two.

What is the pay scale difference between the two in Michigan? What is required in the way of schooling and med. updates after I have finished? Is it expensive to keep up? How does this all work?

I am going to go back and finish my pre-nursing classes and will finish them in December. I need to put in my application for the nursing program if this is what I am going to do?

I currently have been working with Mentally challenged and physically disabled individuals for the last four years and I love my job. I want a career that will be as rewarding and challenging I love helping people.

My only problem is money. I need to pick a career and get it done. Please....I know I am new here but the help would be appreciated immensely.

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amybethf specializes in ICCU - cardiac.

376 Posts; 5,102 Profile Views

Welcome! Does your current college offer both programs? If so, talk to a counselor. If not, look into schools nearby and talk to a counselor there. With a degree in science already, chances are u have most pre-req's and co-req's done for both. At my school for an ADN u need the following:

2 English, Soc, Psych, Dev Psych, Pharm, Math, Bio, Chem & 2 A&P's.

Both English, Psych, Bio, Chem and Math and passing the Nursing Entrance Test (NET) must be done to gain admission and get on the waitlist. U can do all others as co-req's while in the program but it is strongly advised to have only nursing courses left as it is very demanding.

Other schools admission policies are different, ie, some may be based on GPA, etc. Mine is solely based on when u get on the waitlist. It is 1-2 year wait.

Hope this helps! I am not pursuing an LPN so I have not a clue about their requirements. Good Luck!

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jessi1106 has 7 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Adult Acute Care Medicine.

486 Posts; 6,246 Profile Views

yes, there is a difference in pay and in practice. the rn makes more. a lpn does not have the same scope of practice that an rn does. for example a lpn cannot hang blood products. an rn delegates to an lpn. in reality, thejobs are nearly the same, but i would strongly advise getting your rn. this leaves plenty of room for advancement. also, the hospital where i work is trying to get something called "magnet status", and my unit is not hiring any more nurses that are not rn's. (not sure how many places are like that though). best of luck.

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A big thank you to all of you that have helped me in answering my questions. I have decided to continue my education here at my local community college. I am going for the RN. I only pray I can get through the hard work.

Happy summer to all.:idea:

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When I was in nursing school we, as a class were required to take the LPN board which is half/way through the RN program. I didn't practice as an LPN but the value I gained from taking "a board" was priceless. When I sat for the RN boards it wasn't so new to me.

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