Seriously thinking about ARMY Nursing

  1. Well, I'm back.

    I was here a while ago while I was doing my CNA course at the local Tech. school.
    My plan WAS to make my work schedule work with a school schedule, and put myself through Nursing School. I tried (went to days, took a different position), but I just can't have any guaranteed days off. Work thinks they are the most important thing in my life. I think differently.

    I've thought alot about what I can do to make something of my life, and I think I may have found the answer..

    Join the ARMY.

    Here's some info on me:

    -Male
    -27 years old
    -Single, no kids
    -Renter - signed a new lease a few months ago
    -5'9", 210 (I gained about 50-60 pounds after I quit smoking in April '05)
    -GED, CNA. No further education
    -Overall good health. A bit overweight and out of shape at present, but I have a year to fix that before my lease is up.
    -Been at my current job almost 9 years. Good standing. All of my supervisors have/do like me. I'd rather work than chit-chat.
    -Minor things on my criminal record - traffic, trespass, underage drinking. Nothing major, and nothing for the past 5-6 years.
    -Hope to become a RN, and would like to specialize (thinking CRNA, but it's a bit early to be sure). I DO want to specialize somewhere though.
    -Get choked up every time the National Anthem plays. I have always thanked Vets for their service. But words are cheap. It would be nice to do more.


    SO....

    91WM6, 4 year enlistment?

    Will I be able to get my education in the ARMY, or are they mostly interested in educated people for this area?

    I don't have a problem working my way up the ladder. I just spent 9 years of my life working my way up the ladder at this job, and found out there isn't much at the top here. I'm looking for a taller ladder.

    Any thoughts, ideas, suggestions are welcome!
  2. Visit Someday-C.R.N.A. profile page

    About Someday-C.R.N.A.

    Joined: Jun '05; Posts: 398; Likes: 10
    Army Medic, Nurse (LVN)
    Specialty: Nursing Assistant/ Army Medic, LVN

    21 Comments

  3. by   Gennaver
    Quote from Someday-C.R.N.A.
    Well, I'm back.

    Any thoughts, ideas, suggestions are welcome!
    I am in the process of applying. When I was your age it was something that I wanted to do but put off for nonsense reasons.

    If this is something that you want to do and want to be part of something greater than yourself that will support you and help you reach your goals for the future I say GO FOR IT.

    If you scan the threads in the Military fnurse orum there is one that starts with the MOS that you seek to attain and in it there are links that I posted to a website which gives more information on that MOS, there is also information on that same page on the left in red which details things to consider in order to not only make an informed choice regarding enlisting in the Army or military but, also to help you know what to expect as you go through the procedure.

    Good luck!
    Gen
  4. by   Jarnaes
    The Army will give you tuition assistance (-right now it's 100%) so that you can attend college online/evenings/weekends. If you want to become a RN the Army also have the Army Enlisted Commissioning Program (AECP). You will attend the school of your choice, still receive full pay and have most of the tuition paid (max is $3500 per semester). You will have to complete your BSN in 24 months or less. Program web page: http://www.usarec.army.mil/AECP/index.htm
    If you have any questions- PM me. I used to be a 91W medic/EMT, then did the 91WM6 program, then the AECP. I have been on active duty for 16 years (enlisted/NCO for 10 of them), currently working as an OR nurse, and I love it!
  5. by   Someday-C.R.N.A.
    Thanks for the replies.

    I think it's sounding like I should just enlist, making sure 91wm6 is in my contract, and go from there. (Obviously considering I qualify)

    They'll run me through BCT, then the 91w which is the EMT stuff, then LVN/LPN from there. Sound about right?

    (And whatever else they want me to do in that time, of course).

    Then I just soldier on to RN, ADN and BSN from there.

    Obviously simplified, but does that sound about right?


    I'm still reading all the other links and threads. This is alot to think about!
  6. by   Gennaver
    Quote from Jarnaes
    The Army will give you tuition assistance (-right now it's 100%) so that you can attend college online/evenings/weekends. If you want to become a RN the Army also have the Army Enlisted Commissioning Program (AECP). You will attend the school of your choice, still receive full pay and have most of the tuition paid (max is $3500 per semester). You will have to complete your BSN in 24 months or less. Program web page: http://www.usarec.army.mil/AECP/index.htm
    If you have any questions- PM me. I used to be a 91W medic/EMT, then did the 91WM6 program, then the AECP. I have been on active duty for 16 years (enlisted/NCO for 10 of them), currently working as an OR nurse, and I love it!
    I take this to mean that for the first two yeas of the pre-clinical portion of the BSN that you do it online or at night school but, for the final two years with the clinical portion they will pay you to be a full-time student? Makes sense now.

    At my undergrad institution many people transfered for their final two years for the BSN after first obtaining the much less expensive junior college associate degree for the first two year and pre-clinical pre-requisite courses.

    Ah, if only I'd known this stuff 10-20 years ago!!
    Gen
  7. by   Someday-C.R.N.A.
    Quote from Gennaver
    I take this to mean that for the first two yeas of the pre-clinical portion of the BSN that you do it online or at night school but, for the final two years with the clinical portion they will pay you to be a full-time student? Makes sense now.

    At my undergrad institution many people transfered for their final two years for the BSN after first obtaining the much less expensive junior college associate degree for the first two year and pre-clinical pre-requisite courses.

    Ah, if only I'd known this stuff 10-20 years ago!!
    Gen

    Aahh.. I see.

    I was still assuming that there was a RN, ASN program, but it appears you are right - it's a straight BSN. That makes sense.

    Sounds like a good deal to me, provided you're allowed enough 'free' time to persue your pre-clinical studies.
    Last edit by Someday-C.R.N.A. on Oct 7, '06
  8. by   Someday-C.R.N.A.
    Hey guys and gals, just thought I'd stop by to post a quick update.

    I went to MEPS the second time on November 2 for the physical. (Already took the ASVAB the first time I was there). I passed the physical and everything was good there.

    Took my AIMS test, and eventually got called into the Army office to negotiate a contract.

    I sat at the desk and the man asked me what I wanted. I told him 68WM6 (Formerly 91WM6). He asked if I would sign if he couldn't get the M6, and I said that I would not. He started making phone calls, clicked around in the computer for a while, and asked a question now and then. Finally, he looks at me and says "You're a lucky man. You got your Mike 6". (Apparently, not many highschool dropouts with GEDs walk into the M6 identifier).

    So I moved on to the next desk and went through the actual signing of my contract. Didn't take long there at all. Went and took my oath from there.

    Here's the real clincher - I ship on Nov. 16! I have to move out of my house and be ready to go by the 15th! WOW, do I have alot to do!

    I feel a little.... .

    BTW, I'll do my BCT at Ft. Leonard Wood, then I'll be off to Ft. Sam Houston for AIT (which will last about 69 weeks).
  9. by   Cryst06
    Quote from Someday-C.R.N.A.
    Hey guys and gals, just thought I'd stop by to post a quick update.

    I went to MEPS the second time on November 2 for the physical. (Already took the ASVAB the first time I was there). I passed the physical and everything was good there.

    Took my AIMS test, and eventually got called into the Army office to negotiate a contract.

    I sat at the desk and the man asked me what I wanted. I told him 68WM6 (Formerly 91WM6). He asked if I would sign if he couldn't get the M6, and I said that I would not. He started making phone calls, clicked around in the computer for a while, and asked a question now and then. Finally, he looks at me and says "You're a lucky man. You got your Mike 6". (Apparently, not many highschool dropouts with GEDs walk into the M6 identifier).

    So I moved on to the next desk and went through the actual signing of my contract. Didn't take long there at all. Went and took my oath from there.

    Here's the real clincher - I ship on Nov. 16! I have to move out of my house and be ready to go by the 15th! WOW, do I have alot to do!

    I feel a little.... .

    BTW, I'll do my BCT at Ft. Leonard Wood, then I'll be off to Ft. Sam Houston for AIT (which will last about 69 weeks).
    You'll be at FT. Sam for a guranteed 16 weeks(Medic)+8 weeks(Phase 1)+any misc time you spend before the class starts(I spent about 5 weeks doing 'Post Beautification Specialist').

    M6 phase 2 sites are on a rotation(last I heard, they were closing down Walter Reed, but I haven't kept up with that since I graduated earlier this year). Rotation is: Ft. Lewis, WA-->Ft. Gordon, GA-->Ft. Bliss, TX--->Walter Reed(Dunno)-->Ft. Sam Houston, TX. So there is a chance you'll be at FT. Sam for that length, but maybe not. Btw, although M6 says its 52 weeks long, mine lasted(Phase 1+2) 13 months(holidays and such extend the length).

    GL, and keep your head down and in the books(I lost a lot of money during Medic school )
  10. by   augigi
    Congratulations on your new career!!
  11. by   Someday-C.R.N.A.
    Thank you!

    Cryst06, thanks for the reminder. My recruiter told me about the rotations (although he was a bit more vague), and I had forgotten about it. That'll be a great experience (I hope).
    I'm going to be a VERY busy boy!!
  12. by   Gennaver


    Congratulations and good luck!!! WOWSA, big change, big step and you earned it.

    Gen-hope to read you here when you have the time

    Quote from Someday-C.R.N.A.
    Hey guys and gals, just thought I'd stop by to post a quick update.

    ...So I moved on to the next desk and went through the actual signing of my contract. Didn't take long there at all. Went and took my oath from there.

    Here's the real clincher - I ship on Nov. 16! I have to move out of my house and be ready to go by the 15th! WOW, do I have alot to do!

    I feel a little.... .

    BTW, I'll do my BCT at Ft. Leonard Wood, then I'll be off to Ft. Sam Houston for AIT (which will last about 69 weeks).
  13. by   newbered
    Hey, I'm a nursing student who's been in the guard for seven years. The guard has paid 100% of my college tuition while allowing me to, for the majority of the time (except that one weekend a month) focus solely on my civilian life. I additionally recieve the montgomery GI bill, and drill pay, which usually chalks up to 4-500 bucks a month. I'm currently in the process of applying to the army nurse corps program, which will put me in the inactive ready reserve until i finish school, give me a grand a month and two 5000 dollar bonuses until i finish school, at which time i will commission into the active duty army as a bachelors degree nurse, with a choice of duty stations and specialties. the army will not put you through RN school per se, but once you get your bachelors they offer $$ back, and also have a CRNA program, tuition room board etc. paid, and it's an army course. hope this helps.
  14. by   Someday-C.R.N.A.
    I just came across this old thread and thought I'd bump it up incase anyone else is thinking about doing the same thing I am.

    I graduated basic training on Feb. 09, and headed out for Ft. Sam Houston the same day. Graduated 68W (Medic) 16 weeks later, and now I'm in the M6 (LPN) program at Ft. Sam.

    Medic training was interesting. It gets really interesting when you move into the Army Medic side, as opposed to the more 'civilian' EMT training you start out with, although that was pretty cool too. The Army side affords a bigger (MUCH bigger) scope of practice, and greater autonomy. Good training.

    M6 has been pretty good thus far, but it's no joke. It moves fast, and if you don't put forth the effort, you'll fail - guaranteed. Awesome training though. I've learned alot in the short time I've been up here. We're exactly half way through our phase I training, and I have a 94 GPA, so I'm not doing too bad right now. Plenty of difficult tests to come, though.

    But I'm glad I joined the Army, and I'm happy here. To someone who's considering joining, I'd say do it. It's not for everyone, but it really has been rewarding. And to anyone who does do it, pay attention in Medic school. That training will build a foundation that will help you when you get up here. The more you learn there, the more prepared you'll be, and trust me, you'll thank yourself for it!

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