Who's fault is it? Help Guys!

  1. Okay, last week was our first day of clinicals at a nursing home. My partner's client wasn't available so my partner wanted to give me a hand. Except my partner wanted to do the majority of the work( no bad intentions, just type A personality) Well, we asked the instructor how to put on the brief after I gave the client a bath. I said: "This way?" and the instructor said: "Yeah" and turned around to answer someone else. The next thing I know my partner is trying to lift the client up, trying to make the client stand while we slip the brief on. What happens? You guessed it. They both fell on the wet floor. No one was hurt. The instructor said I should have helped my partner more, but I didn't know what to do. I was just standing there like an idiot with a brief in my hand. I was humiliated. Who is at fault here? What should have happened?
  2. Visit WindyhillBSN profile page

    About WindyhillBSN

    Joined: May '06; Posts: 387; Likes: 166
    Telemetry R.N.
    Specialty: Telemetry/Cardiac Floor

    7 Comments

  3. by   PedsNurse322
    It sounds to me like your partner was a little too much "type A". She shouldn't have tried to lift the patient by herself (I mean, did she even ask you for help? And it seems like you didn't even have a chance to offer help before she jumped in there.) and I suppose both of you should have been aware of the water on the floor from the bath and the hazard involved with that... but I wouldn't pin "blame" on anyone in particular. It's just good that nobody (esp the patient) got hurt. Live and learn, and don't beat yourself up over it.
  4. by   GooeyRN
    Im not one for pinning blame. Its both students fault. One/both of you should have wiped up the wet floor better. And if two students were available, both should have assisted the patient to stand. Take care of your backs! Especially when help is right there. Chalk it up as a learning experience. You will work with MANY type A personalities. You will need to learn to be assertive with them. I hope that no one was injured or got in trouble.
  5. by   Daytonite
    Before I continue I just gotta take this one potshot. The instructor shouldn't have turned her back. She could have addressed the other person while still facing you two and kept her eye on what you and your fellow student were doing and prevented this tragedy from occurring. She has a much higher duty when supervising brand new students to make sure patients are being attended to safely, and IMHO she dropped the ball, so she needs to shoulder a lot of the blame here.

    That said, (I had to get that off my chest) rather than look for blame, I recommend that you reconsider all your and your fellow student's actions and decide how you could have done this whole thing differently so the patient was safe. The brief could have be pulled up by rolling the patient from side to side in the bed or having the patient lift their hips. You should never have a patient stand unless you have assessed their ability to do so and know what they are and are not capable of.
  6. by   Tweety
    The problem I see was the lack of communication on your partner's side. She might have said. "Let's get him to stand and put the brief on that way." rather than take control.

    Perhaps you could have seen her standing the patient up and jumped into help rather than just stand there.

    Finally your instructor's wrong for trying to pin the blame on someone. It's poor practice when an incident happens to play the blame came. The instructor might have given more guidance as she/he was in the room.

    Stop the blame game and learn. Talk to your partner that you would like better communication in the future and for her to assist with your patients rather than take over.

    Everyone should learn how to put on a brief, all three of you. I usually roll from side to side, or if they can lift their hips slide it under them. I don't stand them up.

    Good luck!!!
  7. by   WindyhillBSN
    Quote from Tweety
    The problem I see was the lack of communication on your partner's side. She might have said. "Let's get him to stand and put the brief on that way." rather than take control.

    Perhaps you could have seen her standing the patient up and jumped into help rather than just stand there.

    Finally your instructor's wrong for trying to pin the blame on someone. It's poor practice when an incident happens to play the blame came. The instructor might have given more guidance as she/he was in the room.

    Stop the blame game and learn. Talk to your partner that you would like better communication in the future and for her to assist with your patients rather than take over.

    Everyone should learn how to put on a brief, all three of you. I usually roll from side to side, or if they can lift their hips slide it under them. I don't stand them up.

    Good luck!!!

    Thanks, you're right. I wrote my partner a little note asking for the person not to do it again. My partner seems to have a little of an attitude now, but I don't care. On my partner's self-assement sheet my partner marked that everything was done correctly on his/her part. I put the truth. I hate it when people don't admit their mistakes.
  8. by   PedsNurse322
    On my partner's self-assement sheet my partner marked that everything was done correctly on his/her part. I put the truth. I hate it when people don't admit their mistakes.
    Sounds like you need to watch your back around that "partner"... that stinks.
  9. by   WindyhillBSN
    Quote from 2008RN2B
    Sounds like you need to watch your back around that "partner"... that stinks.
    I will! Thanks!

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