Pros and Cons of BSN/MSN

  1. Hi all,
    I'm finishing my ADN this December and am trying to decide on whether or not to pursue my BSN as planned or make a leap straight to MSN completion. I'd love to hear from fellow students and RN's and learn of your thoughts and experience with the programs. Also, did you or are you planning to complete your education immediately upon receipt of your license or do you suggesting waiting to complete training on the job first?
    Thanks so much and look forward to hearing from you all!
    D
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    Joined: Oct '18; Posts: 2; Likes: 1

    3 Comments

  3. by   tonyl1234
    Doesn't pretty much every RN to MSN program still give you the equivalent of a BSN on the way? If I'm right about that, most schools you can usually still get your BSN while you're in the direct to MSN program.
  4. by   pro-student
    Quote from tonyl1234
    Doesn't pretty much every RN to MSN program still give you the equivalent of a BSN on the way? If I'm right about that, most schools you can usually still get your BSN while you're in the direct to MSN program.
    No, that's wrong. The vast majority of RN to MSN programs don't grant a BSN in the process (the only exception I know of is University of Missouri) which means that if you don't finish the whole program for any reason you won't have earned any degree. Plus because of transfer rules and credits in residence, you would probably have to repeat most of your coursework to earn a BSN at another school. It's quite a risk to take because if anything happens along the way, years of coursework can leave you with nothing to show.

    Since the OP didn't mention any particular reason for getting an MSN nor a particular direction, I would strongly caution them to earn their BSN first. Being a new nurse, your goals and plans can change drastically from what you want now. Earning you BSN allows you to make progress towards your goals while still allowing you the flexibility to change those goals in the future. Earning a BSN will always be useful no matter what direction you decide to take your career. Bypassing the BSN for an RN to MSN program will not significantly shorten your educational timeline but will increase your risk significantly.
  5. by   SopranoKris
    Most RN-to-MSN programs either a) will not award the BSN, or b) will withhold granting the BSN until *both* BSN & MSN requirements are completed. Those that fall in category B will usually give you a "letter of completion" to show your employer if you need proof of BSN. There are a few school that grant an actual BSN, but you're really not doing an RN-to-MSN program. You're really just completing a BSN and then starting the MSN program immediately.

    One thing to consider: most RN-to-MSN programs will charge the graduate level tuition rate, even for your BSN courses. It might be less expensive to do an RN-to-BSN program and pay the undergraduate tuition rate.

    I would highly suggest completing your ADN, taking a few months off and concentrate on gaining experience as a new RN first. Then start an RN-to-BSN program while working. I would also advise taking some time off in between getting the BSN and pursuing the MSN. It's very easy to get burned out with school, especially at the graduate level when you are churning out APA papers in your sleep!

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