Nursing Tuition off the Chain!! Need Help!! - page 6

Okay so I just got accepted to Drexel University's BSN program. For those of you who may not know anything about Drexel, it is a private University where the cost is 38K+ PER YEAR for tuition ALONE -... Read More

  1. by   nep1980
    My mother-in-law is a Nurse Practitioner, she is not working right now to help take care of my daughter and the recruiters keep hounding her like crazy with lucrative job offers and tons of bonuses. She asked them about nursing and they said they are placing nurses, but they have to have a BSN, and one year experience. They said that they don't work with ADN, or diploma nurses. Originally I was going to go this route but then I realized it would take even longer that way for me to become a Nurse Practitioner, and I do know at least where I am from the Philly area that it is important to the Nurse Practitioner programs where you get you BSN from.
  2. by   nep1980
    [quote=JoI8815;3668626]Yes the only thing I'm waiting for is my letter of recommendation. That's why my application was late in the first place with the other schools. CCP teachers take FOREVER to give you a letter of recommendation. Anywayz, you said it takes 3.5 semesters. Do you mean 3.5 years? Because 3.5 semesters adds up to 2 years or 1 year and 1/2 if you include the summer session - Fall (1), Spring (2), Fall (3) and Spring (4) - right?

    Yes I meant 3.5 years sorry, its 7 semesters

    Let me know if you get it!!! I will keep my fingers crossed for you! BTW call them to check on things they are really niuce, melissa is the Nursing admissions advisor she went out of her way to personally call me and keep me updated.
  3. by   Nurse523
    1. Look for scholarships and bursaries in your school.
    2. Apply for the emergency bursary if available in your school.
    3. Do you know any wealthy family members such as an uncle or aunt? I know in Toronto, Ontario the banks give out loans with students if the student can show proof that they have a family member or know someone who can be accountable to pay your tuition fees just in case.
  4. by   tfleuter
    Overwhelming debt (of any kind) is exactly that -- overwhelming. Mentally, physically, emotionally overwhelming. To me, it isn't a question of whether a certain college is worth the tuition - the question is whether the debt is worth it. Owing someone else significant amounts of money is not a comfortable place to be.
    I feel this is worth repeating. Anytime you accumulate debt, you are taking on risk. The more debt, the higher the risk. Of course, everyone is going to be comfortable with different levels, but talk to those who did take the big risks and then got the wind knocked out of them and you'll see that many of them were confident in their decisions at the time too. Some win, some lose, all for different reasons.

    I am taking out small student loans here and there and believe I am investing in my future. But I have a set amount that I have pre-determined is far too risky for my comfort and at which point I would no longer be investing in myself as much as I would be robbing my future.
  5. by   CuriousMe
    Quote from tfleuter
    I feel this is worth repeating. Anytime you accumulate debt, you are taking on risk. The more debt, the higher the risk. Of course, everyone is going to be comfortable with different levels, but talk to those who did take the big risks and then got the wind knocked out of them and you'll see that many of them were confident in their decisions at the time too. Some win, some lose, all for different reasons.

    I am taking out small student loans here and there and believe I am investing in my future. But I have a set amount that I have pre-determined is far too risky for my comfort and at which point I would no longer be investing in myself as much as I would be robbing my future.
    I'm so glad you found a program that fits your needs.

    I'm also very glad that there are many different kinds of programs, so that we can all find the program that fits each of our needs.
  6. by   MotivatedOne
    Quote from ShelbyHisler
    I am also planning on becoming a Nurse Practitioner and am 28, so I AGREE TOTALLY with you. Get the proper BSN to let you study at the graduate level right from the gate. You will be more than rewarded and comfortably able to pay back you debt. Live you life do what you want, its not like you won't have options as a nurse. Many of my friends from the community college where I did my pre req's are going to only get their Associates, they are like "oh I will get my job to pay for my education later". I say forget later invest today, you only get out what you put in!!!!
    From my research, most schools require you have at least 1 year of clinical experience (ie work experience as an RN) before being accepted into a Master's program. So technically you can't study at the graduate level right from the gate. If you do go for your ADN, you can work towards getting your BSN degree right while gaining your 1 year of work experience, then apply for the MSN program of your choice...A lot of schools offer an RN-MSN degree program.
  7. by   JoI8815
    Yes I meant 3.5 years sorry, its 7 semesters

    Let me know if you get it!!! I will keep my fingers crossed for you! BTW call them to check on things they are really niuce, melissa is the Nursing admissions advisor she went out of her way to personally call me and keep me updated.[/quote]

    O waw are you serious? That's sooo not part of my plan! I didn't even know that waw. I mean if I wanted to do that I'd go to Eastern University or something...sigggghhhhh...it doesn't even make sense to take that long if you already completed all your pre-reqs and you're going full-time (I have an AA degree in Culture Science and Technology so I took most of the pre-reqs that most schools require)....I'm not too sure about that...we'll see.
  8. by   nep1980
    I believe the experience is supposed to be as a BSN RN. Also the advantage of getting the BSN from the gate (is no matter how unfair it may sound, preference is given to school's with recognition.
  9. by   MotivatedOne
    Quote from ShelbyHisler
    I believe the experience is supposed to be as a BSN RN. Also the advantage of getting the BSN from the gate (is no matter how unfair it may sound, preference is given to school's with recognition.
    It doesn't specify experience as a BSN RN. Either way, there are still schools that offer RN-MSN degree programs. Granted it may take you an extra semester to get your MSN degree but if you take the extra classes at the community college while obtaining an ADN degree you can get the same education for less...I'm sure there are plenty of ADN programs out there with recognition just as there are a lot of schools that offer a BSN degree with a low passing rate.

    To the OP...whatever you decide to do...good luck!
  10. by   nep1980
    I just checked the sites from school in the Philadelphia Area, which is where I am from. MSN, must have a BSN. Or complete extra courses after receiving there ADN, before they can even petition. All I am saying is the easiest possible route is a BSN right from the gate. Also to even apply you have to have had above a 3.00 gpa. they will let you in below that if there is room on a probaation. Everyone has to do what is right form them. Trust me I thouht about al the possible options, did my research, my mother-in-law is a CRNP, she talked with me and so did some recruiters that have been calling her to offer her new positions. They told me that they don't even place ADN or Diploma Nurses. All things combined I decided it best to go straight to the BSN. I would love to be able to work as an RN sooner, I am married and have a 21 month old little girl; however I will in the long run be more secure sooner, but an RN one year later. As I said though it's all a matter of personal choice, untill the SBON decided to regulate the degrees more. It is aslo a matter of choice to those on the admission boards at eh various programs that offer graduate nursing degrees.
  11. by   UVA Grad Nursing
    I agree with most of the above. But I do think that a degree from a Top 10 school (Johns Hopkins, Penn, Michigan, etc) will continue to be noticed by hiring officials (and certainly by graduate schools). I earned my undegradaute degree 20+ years ago (and worked as an assistant dean for most of that time). Yes my first degree is still noted because it carries a cachet.
  12. by   jollydogg_RN
    Quote from MotivatedOne
    From my research, most schools require you have at least 1 year of clinical experience (ie work experience as an RN) before being accepted into a Master's program. So technically you can't study at the graduate level right from the gate. If you do go for your ADN, you can work towards getting your BSN degree right while gaining your 1 year of work experience, then apply for the MSN program of your choice...A lot of schools offer an RN-MSN degree program.
    This.

    THIS is why I chose the ADN, then RN to BSN route.

    30k loans from 5.5 years of school, now working on my BSN. Not bad if I say so myself.

    I plan on eventually working at the VA, and they will pay for schooling and also repay loans up to a certain point after a year. As long as I stay below 45k in loans, this will be good.
  13. by   Elizabeth5472
    jollydogg
    Your hard to find! Congrat on the Hesi/NCLEX

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