Nurse Salary vs. Teacher Salary? - page 5

I was talking to a friend this morning and she is just finishing Nursing school and said that she could have become a Teacher with better hours and the same pay? Is this true? I know as a RN we start... Read More

  1. by   whoknows56
    Quote from jayeldee
    I am going to graduate with a BSN and I thought that it was the better choice when I started nursing school but I'm a little concerned that I won't be making more than ADN because I have over 50K in student loans that the ADN won't have. It just costs more time and money to get a BSN so I think that we should have some sort of compensation for that in the workplace. I'm not saying that the work is any different or that one is better than the other, I'm just saying that if you take the extra time and effort and expense to get the BSN, you should have some hope of paying your student loans when you graduate.
    Education debt is just debt. You will get it paid off as long as you make it a focus of your expenses. Sure the ADNs will make as much as you, but there is more to it. You got the chance to experience the college atmosphere and you have more career growth potential. The ADNs you will be working with, if they wanted to move up to a new nursing position, they will have to go back to school to get that BSN........sure some might work and go to school at the same time, but it will most likely take them longer.

    Edit: I also want to add the following. Once a person starts going down the road of comparing salaries of "professionals", you will always start comparing your $45,000 a year salary with the local accountants and the local accountants will start comparing their salaries with the hedgefund managers pulling in six figures and up to multiple millions of dollars a year and the hedgefund managers will compare their salaries to the CEO's of very succesfull businesses and the richest CEO's will compare their salaries to the richest athelets.

    In other words, there will always be a person that makes more than you. Only one person, out of billions, makes the most money of any person.

    True happyness is not the number in your checking account, but it does help, but being happy with yourself.
    Last edit by whoknows56 on May 25, '09
  2. by   firefox828
    Quote from jayeldee
    I am going to graduate with a BSN and I thought that it was the better choice when I started nursing school but I'm a little concerned that I won't be making more than ADN because I have over 50K in student loans that the ADN won't have. It just costs more time and money to get a BSN so I think that we should have some sort of compensation for that in the workplace. I'm not saying that the work is any different or that one is better than the other, I'm just saying that if you take the extra time and effort and expense to get the BSN, you should have some hope of paying your student loans when you graduate.
    You must have known all along before you started nursing school that there's not that much of a difference in salary between BSN and ASN; you chose the BSN route.
  3. by   sunray12
    Quote from mebaker12
    What about nurse salary vs. nurse professor salary? I have wondered why some college professors who are extremely smart are not in other professions (e.g. math/statistics college teacher vs. engineer, or biology/anatomy teacher vs. doctor?)??

    After posting this comment, I will try to find more information regarding nursing professors.

    One more thought...I've heard many times that it is not the shortage of people who want to become nurses, but the shortage of nursing professors that is the limiting factor.
    Starting professor salaries are the same regardless of discipline. Pay increases based on experience. As for why teaching vs practice? Some people just want to teach. The end game is not always to become a practitioner.

    Many engineers spend a 60+ hours/week in cube farms, math professors have their own offices, free roam of beautiful college campuses and the classroom teaching part of their job is only a few hours/week. It's a lifestyle thing.
  4. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Quote from sunray12
    Many engineers spend a 60+ hours/week in cube farms, math professors have their own offices, free roam of beautiful college campuses and the classroom teaching part of their job is only a few hours/week. It's a lifestyle thing.
    Not to mention that tenured professors have life-time job security and defined-benefit pension plans... few practicing engineers enjoy those.
  5. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Quote from jayeldee
    I am going to graduate with a BSN and I thought that it was the better choice when I started nursing school but I'm a little concerned that I won't be making more than ADN because I have over 50K in student loans that the ADN won't have. It just costs more time and money to get a BSN so I think that we should have some sort of compensation for that in the workplace. I'm not saying that the work is any different or that one is better than the other, I'm just saying that if you take the extra time and effort and expense to get the BSN, you should have some hope of paying your student loans when you graduate.
    You shouldn't be compensated more simply because it cost you more time and money to earn your license.
  6. by   Cinqly
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    You shouldn't be compensated more simply because it cost you more time and money to earn your license.
    It didn't cost more time and money. It cost more EFFORT. If you make the effort to have a broader general education, including additional nursing classes, should you not be compensated for that effort? It's common in most professions to be compensated more with higher education. Not all, but most. To put it into perspective, teachers get paid more if they have a masters or doctorate degree. Nursing is different for some reason because of the license. But should it be? I don't think so. Just my opinion.

    And incidentally, the university that I went to was VERY affordable and cost not much more than some 2-year programs.
  7. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Quote from cinqly
    It didn't cost more time and money.
    I was just quoting:
    jayeldee It just costs more time and money to get a BSN so I think that we should have some sort of compensation for that in the workplace.
    You then stated,
    Quote from cinqly
    It's common in most professions to be compensated more with higher education. Not all, but most.
    Really? Most? Can you back that up? Besides teaching, I can't off the top of my head think of a single profession in which additional degrees are a guarantee of higher pay. The ones that I know intimately are engineering, chemistry, aviation/piloting (I'm excluding addition type ratings as 'education'), and firefighting -- not in any of those professions is additional education a guaranteed higher paycheck... in the latter two, it's guaranteed to be no different and the former two are based on performance and/or individual negotiation.

    It cost more EFFORT. If you make the effort to have a broader general education, including additional nursing classes, should you not be compensated for that effort?
    No. The effort that one puts in to their education is no basis upon which to provide additional compensation.

    Now, all that said, I DO think that additional education does warrant higher compensation but not for the reasons stated by jayeldee or by you. The reason that higher education is should warrant higher compensation is simply that I believe - ON AVERAGE, GENERALLY SPEAKING - a more highly educated person is more able to respond to novel situations and to provide other services to the institution beyond the minimal basics of their license.

    It's the additional knowledge and experience that warrants the higher pay, not the time, cost, or effort of obtaining it.

    Before y'all start flaming me, please note that I said "I believe," "ON AVERAGE," and "GENERALLY SPEAKING." If you're going to flame me, at least take into account what I've actually said.
  8. by   Aneroo
    Quote from katzchen, SWT
    Respectfully, I have to disagree with you on almost every point. At least here in Ohio, our unions tend to be very weak and administrator friendly. Class sizes in low income districts are horrible and as a teacher no one ever gave a hoot that we regularly had 30-35 high schoolers per class.

    And parents are the entire reason I left teaching. I couldn't take another year of parents calling the principal or the administration every time they or their student didn't get exactly what they wanted. The principals/administration always backed the students and parents and left the teachers virtually powerless. IMO, the parents at the schools are feel every bit as entitled as the patients I now see at the hospital (as a social work trainee)

    Honestly both careers have their ups and their downs, but as they are so different I don't think it is even possible to guess at who has it better. ( but I do I know that many of the teachers I taught with have gone on to become nurses In their words, better pay, fewer hours, same old ****)
    I agree. I don't think we have a teachers union here. I'm a school nurse, and my ideas of what teachers do was grossly underestimated. I'm shocked to read on the sign in sheet where many have signed in by 6:00 am, and then are expected to coach sports or are required to help with other activities outside of normal school hours. They're threatened by students (and family) with nothing more an a chance of suspension for the student. Parents call and yell (and threaten) because their child is failing a class (when the child is falling asleep in class, has been given opportunity to make up missed work and they refuse to), becuase it's all the teachers fault that a child is failing a class. On the opposite end, there are the parents that can't even be reached when the child is failing and they could care less what the kid is doing.

    Here, the new grad instructors start out at about 33K. Even during the summer off they're working to get the continuing education and lesson plans made. Their class sizes are growing to unsafe levels, they're facing unrealistic expectations from the government while being provided with less and less to do it with.
  9. by   rnicupcu
    If I could afford it I would become a teacher and work as a Public School teacher. I find the benefits where I reside superior to that of nursing. When I graduated with BSN I owed a ton of money and I started out making exactly what a new teacher in same county started out at per school board salary list....I was shocked. Yet I worked almost every weekend and felt tired all of the time. I also worked every holiday b/c one person made schedule and it was simply set in stone. I love caring for patients but I also adore children and would be much happier in the teaching profession but can not afford to return to school at this time. Good luck to those trying to decide....difficult decision.
  10. by   jk82
    I am a registered nurse that is now teaching/nursing at a high school. Teaching is not as stressful as nursing - (the life or death factor). It is exhausting though. I make about the same as I would in the hospital, but I'm definitely working more hours! My husband teaches in a district where the max pay for teachers with a Master's Degree + 30 hours beyond that along with a minium of 10 years experience tops out around $89,000! I guess you have to consider a nurse with a Master's degree-Nurse Practitioner would probably make a comparable salary. I would have to say floor nursing is more difficult-physically and mentally, but my family life was easier. Teaching is less difficult for me, but I feel like I have less time for my personal life-getting things done around the house etc...now I'm working 5 days a week...and they are 10-12 hour days and I am coaching! I thought life would be easier as a teacher, but I was wrong! It's true I don't get as stressed about going to work and worrying whether or not I'm going to kill someone by making a mistake, but I do get stressed out because I can't do the things I used to when I was working 3 days a week....weekends go by fast!! I think I'd rather being working a weekend or a holiday here or there and have my days off! Nurses have the option to work per diem and make more an hour if they are able to get benefits from their spouse. I'm learning the grass isn't always greener on the other side! You have to do what's best for YOU...which is a challenge for me personally!
    I'm thinking of going back to nursing to make some extra money while I teach and then sticking with nursing once I begin a family!
    Good luck with your decision!
    Last edit by jk82 on Nov 9, '10
  11. by   BluegrassRN
    I was an LPN for about 7 years and have been an RN (associates) for about 3 years. My husband has 12 years experience at the same high school, is the head of his department, has two bachelors in the areas he teaches as well as a masters in education.

    With less experience, seniority and education, I make about 20K more than he does. His medical benefits are so expensive for a family, we can't afford them. Benefits through my work cost approximately half of what they would through his district.
  12. by   miteacher
    This is very interesting. I am a teacher considering becoming a nurse. I am currently on the waiting list for a fast track LPN program.

    I feel burned out after only 3 years of teaching. I started my year with 35 students in my fourth grade classroom, some of whom were working at a first grade level. The administration is terrible, along with the pay and pretty much everything else. I have decided that I no longer want to spend hours of my own time each day grading papers, making copies, planning lessons, etc...I often come in to work at 6:30 am, and stay until 4pm. I spend my own money on supplies because the school won't even provide us with the basics. I really see why teachers leave so frequently in the first 5 years. I cannot see myself teaching for the next 30 years and dealing with the behavior problems, lack of funding, and lack of rights for teachers.
  13. by   HeartsOpenWide
    Teachers do not make as much as nurses, but Ironically have better health benefits....

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