Interview Blunders

  1. I have been reading some of the threads by people who are wondering why they did not get a job they interviewed for. I have done a lot of interviews over the last three years as a manager, and I will tell you that most of the time when I don't make an offer, it is not because the candidate did not interview well. It is usually because someone else did a little better or seemed a better fit for the unit. There have been times, however when something was said or done during an interview that turned me off to a candidate immediately. Maybe sharing some of these experiences will help.

    First, arrive promptly, but not too early. Arriving an hour before the appointment and expecting me to drop what I am doing for you does not demonstrate that you are eager to work, it demonstrates that you have no respect for my time and schedule.

    Make sure your appearance is neat and professional. Overdone hair, long bright red nails, heavy makeup, sparkly eyeliner and too much jewelry make you appear unprofessional. Greasy, dirty hair, and dirty nails are just as bad. You don't need to wear a three piece suit, but do make sure your clothing is appropriate and clean. Jeans and a sweatshirt or stained clothes are a definite no-no.

    If you must cancel an interview, please have a good reason, and reschedule as soon as possible. If you cancel twice, I will not even schedule a third interview.

    Watch your emotions during the interview. Getting weepy over previous patients does not prove to me how compassionate you are. It makes me wonder if you will have a meltdown at the nurse's station every other day. And an angry tirade about your last boss or your nursing instructorwon't score you any points either.

    Self promotion is appropriate, self agrandizement is not. If you spend the hour telling me how much better you are than everyone else in your class, I am going to wonder if you are trying to convince me or yourself. Don't try to make yourself look more intelligent by using big words that you don't understand. This actually makes you seem pretentious and shows a lack of intelligence. If you don't know what a word means, don't use it. And brush up on your grammer as well.

    And whatever you do, DON'T LIE. I will find out.
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    Joined: Jan '04; Posts: 131; Likes: 625

    4 Comments

  3. by   southernbeegirl
    and when the DON you are interviewing with asks you "where do you want to be in 5 years?" for God's sake don't tell her "I want to be a DON just like you". you wont get that job, lol. trust me on this, lol
  4. by   Teacher Sue
    Another one: Don't tell the manager that you are only applying for her unit because you can't get into the unit you really want. Or that you are applying just to get your year of med-surg so you can get into OB or ICU
  5. by   nebrgirl
    Ok, so do you tell the truth to where you want to be 5 years from now? (i.e. "oh anywhere but med-surg..." or do you lie..."Oh I hope to be an experienced med-surg nurse that others can turn to for help and support "
  6. by   Teacher Sue
    Quote from nebrgirl
    Ok, so do you tell the truth to where you want to be 5 years from now? (i.e. "oh anywhere but med-surg..." or do you lie..."Oh I hope to be an experienced med-surg nurse that others can turn to for help and support "
    I want to hear the truth, but not with a negative attitude. Something like "I want to move forward in my career, perhaps into a specialty like ICU. I think it is important to have a solid med-surg base to help me grow professionally before I move on however." This lets the interviewer know you are career minded, want to grow, but will take a med surg position seriously and not just bide your time till something better comes along

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