I love you boss ... BUT!!... - page 5

Please stop calling me in the middle of the day on my days off begging me to come in..... Its called a schedule for a reason. I am new and already overwhelmed just working my scheduled time. I... Read More

  1. by   trai1971
    Mandate means, in this context, being required to stay over because you have nobody to relieve you.
  2. by   anotherone
    Quote from trai1971
    Mandate means, in this context, being required to stay over because you have nobody to relieve you.
    In many cases, due to the employer's fault . NOT WEATHER OR CALL OUTS. but short staffing. Then told to suck it up or threatened with those "patient abadonment " claims.
  3. by   wooh
    Quote from Brekka
    the facility no longer hires PRN.
    Quote from anotherone
    In many cases, due to the employer's fault . NOT WEATHER OR CALL OUTS. but short staffing. Then told to suck it up or threatened with those "patient abadonment " claims.
    This is the problem. If it was an occasional thing, yes, most of us would "help out." But we're being treated like WE are the problem. Staffing should account for not just people on scheduled vacations (which right now, my unit won't even let us take off anything but pretty much Tuesdays and Wednesdays), but people that take a mandatory class, and yes, even call-ins. IT IS UNREALISTIC TO EXPECT NURSING STAFF TO NEVER GET SICK. We're around germs all day. We're working 16+ hours. Nurses will get sick, will call in, and yes, management should have a plan to staff accordingly even when we call in sick.

    How can they do that? HIRE MORE PEOPLE.

    PRN people. Enough people to cover the schedule when one person takes a vacation. Enough people to cover the schedule if one person calls in sick.

    Sure, multiple people calling in when two nurses are on maternity leave could be an issue that requires calling the regular staff to work extra hours. But one person calling in sick shouldn't be a staffing emergency. Covering for vacations when someone's on maternity leave can be handled way in advance, it shouldn't require mandating. Covering a maternity leave definitely shouldn't require mandating unless the person goes into labor at 30 weeks.

    Poor staffing is not the result of call-ins. Poor staffing is the result of poor planning on the part of the people doing schedules. My hospital has critical needs EVERY SINGLE WEEKEND long BEFORE anybody has called in. That is NOT the fault of staff nurses for daring to get sick and call in.
  4. by   hiddencatRN
    Quote from wooh

    This is the problem. If it was an occasional thing, yes, most of us would "help out." But we're being treated like WE are the problem. Staffing should account for not just people on scheduled vacations (which right now, my unit won't even let us take off anything but pretty much Tuesdays and Wednesdays), but people that take a mandatory class, and yes, even call-ins. IT IS UNREALISTIC TO EXPECT NURSING STAFF TO NEVER GET SICK. We're around germs all day. We're working 16+ hours. Nurses will get sick, will call in, and yes, management should have a plan to staff accordingly even when we call in sick.

    How can they do that? HIRE MORE PEOPLE.

    PRN people. Enough people to cover the schedule when one person takes a vacation. Enough people to cover the schedule if one person calls in sick.

    Sure, multiple people calling in when two nurses are on maternity leave could be an issue that requires calling the regular staff to work extra hours. But one person calling in sick shouldn't be a staffing emergency. Covering for vacations when someone's on maternity leave can be handled way in advance, it shouldn't require mandating. Covering a maternity leave definitely shouldn't require mandating unless the person goes into labor at 30 weeks.

    Poor staffing is not the result of call-ins. Poor staffing is the result of poor planning on the part of the people doing schedules. My hospital has critical needs EVERY SINGLE WEEKEND long BEFORE anybody has called in. That is NOT the fault of staff nurses for daring to get sick and call in.
    Exactly. It's one thing to have a staffing emergency once in a while but when it's all the time, it's not an emergency, it's a chronic understaffing issue. Hire some of these new grads! Work on turnover issues. Make staff feel like you at least appreciate them picking up OT.
  5. by   NyteshiftLVN
    On our station or unit, we started controlling the OT (mandate) to where we already knew who would cover our shift before we would even call in. If someone was short of hours, we would figure out who would call off to give that person hours. Or if someone was tired/couldn't make it/had family obligations, we would volunteer for their shift to cover. It worked out pretty good until they pulled people from another station who had their hours cut, and messed up our whole routine. Now, I don't answer my phone if work calls on my day off. I too feel that it is completely under appreciated.

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