Finally got malpractice insurance. - page 3

I have hemmed and hawed for years, and with each passing year in practice, gotten more and more anxious about NOT having malpractice insurance. I had always been told "nurses who carry personal... Read More

  1. by   CHESSIE
    Quote from SC_RNDude
    You have been a nurse a long time. I would like to hear of all the nurses you have known that have been sued and have their own liability insurance kick in to save them.

    Please share!
    The only nurse, whom I know, and was sued, along with the hospital did have her own liability/malpractice insurance. Doctors and other nurses were mentioned in the suit, too. Sadly, she left the profession, and she was a great nurse. The hospital would have lost the suit due to patient's family, it was a pediatric patient, non compliance. However, the hospital settled out of court. I do not know if the other nurses had their own malpractice insurance, but the physicians did, of course, as they were not employed by the hospital. The doctor of record left the area, and she was a great loss to the hospital, too. She left as her husband's business relocated, and therefore she, too relocated to that area, and now sees patients at a larger, more prestigious hospital.
  2. by   RiskManager
    ^^^Having her own insurance and having that insurance kick in are of course two different things. Since the individual nursing policies are written as excess coverage, I suspect her policy was not triggered and therefore it was not used.
  3. by   SC_RNDude
    Quote from CHESSIE
    The only nurse, whom I know, and was sued, along with the hospital did have her own liability/malpractice insurance. Doctors and other nurses were mentioned in the suit, too. Sadly, she left the profession, and she was a great nurse. The hospital would have lost the suit due to patient's family, it was a pediatric patient, non compliance. However, the hospital settled out of court. I do not know if the other nurses had their own malpractice insurance, but the physicians did, of course, as they were not employed by the hospital. The doctor of record left the area, and she was a great loss to the hospital, too. She left as her husband's business relocated, and therefore she, too relocated to that area, and now sees patients at a larger, more prestigious hospital.
    So, it seems having her own policy wasn't of much benefit.
  4. by   CHESSIE
    Quote from SC_RNDude
    So, it seems having her own policy wasn't of much benefit.
    Perhaps, perhaps not. It did save her one more worry, and she gave up the profession just due to the stress of having the threat of the suit. Criticize her, if you will, but none of us know what we will do in a given situation, until we are there.
    Whether or not you choose to to purchase your own insurance, is entirely up to you. I know that many RNs do choose to purchase their own, although they may or may not speak of their decisions. My close friends did carry their own insurance.
    Someone mentioned, in another post, that it was wise to carry NSO or other malpractice insurance, once they left nursing, through retirement, or to pursue another field or profession, due to the ten year Statute of Limitations, during which time a suit could be instituted.
    I was never sued, but very glad that I had the added protection, as we are all human, and none of us is infallible. The cost is minimal, and if it gives peace of mind, to some, it is well worth the cost.
  5. by   quazar
    Wow, this kind of blew up. I'll just state for the record, that despite RiskManager's obvious misgivings with my choice (edited to add: RM, I respect your opinion, we'll just have to agree to disagree here), that I am pleased with my decision.

    The money is spent. The decision is made. I feel it was a good one. I am pleased. That was my intent with this thread. To share my relief and happiness.

    Okee doke, just had to state that for the record. Y'all carry on.
  6. by   kpat.dnp2b
    Would mind telling company name. I'm new grad n starting work soon it would be great help.
    thank you in advance.
  7. by   CHESSIE
    Quote from kpat.dnp2b
    Would mind telling company name. I'm new grad n starting work soon it would be great help.
    thank you in advance.
    I used Nurses Services Organization. NSO. I retired more than ten years ago, but the last time I renewed my policy the number was 1-800-247-1500. There may be other companies that offer malpractice insurance for nurses, but my close associates used NSO. NSO, also, has/had a web address Malpractice Insurance for Nursing Professionals - NSO (Malpractice Insurance for Nursing Professionals - NSO)
    I wish you a long and successful career.
    Last edit by CHESSIE on Sep 7, '16 : Reason: added web address
  8. by   RiskManager
    Quote from quazar
    Wow, this kind of blew up. I'll just state for the record, that despite RiskManager's obvious misgivings with my choice (edited to add: RM, I respect your opinion, we'll just have to agree to disagree here), that I am pleased with my decision.

    The money is spent. The decision is made. I feel it was a good one. I am pleased. That was my intent with this thread. To share my relief and happiness.

    Okee doke, just had to state that for the record. Y'all carry on.
    For the record, I have no misgivings regarding your choice or of any other nurse who buys it. I do think it is important that people make an informed choice based on accurate information to purchase it or not. There are some coverages and some situations in which having your own policy may be very useful to you. I try to serve as a resource to provide expert knowledge on the subject and provide a counterpoint to some of the misinformation out there on this issue.

    As my article says: In summary, I would recommend purchasing your own individual nursing malpractice liability policy, but don’t necessarily expect that the policy will automatically provide coverage for any malpractice or licensure issues that you are involved in.
  9. by   claudiatraveler
    Just remember that most nurses don't have the benefit of a union like the CNA.
  10. by   Pjking227
    I have had NSO malpractice insurance since I graduated LVN school in 1994and upgraded when I became an RN 1999. Yes
    my hospital said that Risk Management is our malpractice insurance. But like many have said they will only back you if you follow policy by the letter. I have never needed it and I pray to God I never do, but, it's just like my flood insurance I would rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it.
  11. by   Brian960
    I would recommend insurance for the new grad, but after a few years, not so much.

    The reason they can offer a policy for as little as $100/year is that there's only a very slim chance of ever using it.
  12. by   Kssrn404
    This reply is so helpful to me. I work in ICU/CVR. I can't believe that one family sued all the way up the line, nurse 1st, because they said maw maw 88, who was brought back to life but needed permenant dialysis after cardiac arrest (because they said the CPR was not good enough quality to perfuse her kidneys). The family WON the case because it was not documented that a Femoral pulse check was done on a regular basis during the code. Keep in mind that Maw Maw's ribs were probably sooo osteoporotic and brittle, but the nurse performed such good quality Compressions despite this that the patient retained full brain status after the code. OMG!!!! Not only was the nurse that was performing compressions sued, the hospital insurance did NOT cover her since she did not go exactly by hospital protocol, which was stored away in some office somewhere in a book probably a mile thick and in fine print it said to check a femoral pulse during pulse checks even if you get a carotid pulse.
    You can be sure that I will ALWAYS carry coverage. I will also get the max amount I can and make sure it covers my needs.
    I have been a nurse paralegal in the past and I can tell all of you that you can NOT cover yourself enough thru insurance and narrative documentation. It takes extra time that I know y'all don't,but have, but if you learn to do it well you will be covered. Don't say too much, be concise, but be sure to follow up on anything you document that warrants it, Also use narrative to document the outcome and if you corrected the issue. #1 thing is patient safety.....ABC's. Unfortunately after taking care of that we have to worry about HCAPS lol!!!! Patient satisfaction.
    It is a special calling for sure. We don't make anywhere near enough money for the amount of work we do and the liability we carry on our shoulders!
    Last edit by Kssrn404 on Sep 7, '16 : Reason: spelling
  13. by   RiskManager
    ^^^Kssrn404, in what jurisdiction was this case filed?

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