any jobs if no experience??

  1. I'm thinking about going into nursing. To save money and because I have a family I may attend a community college. What are some jobs I can get in a hospital while attending school. I don't have and any experience. Please help.
  2. Visit reina* profile page

    About reina*

    Joined: Jul '10; Posts: 10

    10 Comments

  3. by   Wormie
    Reina,
    After completing your nursing fundamentals class you can work as a nursing assistant in the hospital setting. In fact, I would strongly advise you do this because it will help set you up for employment as an RN once you have completed your education. I wish I had done this. I am a new RN and despite doing an externship, I am unable to find a job. Don't believe the media hype about the nursing shortage. If I were you, I would look into some of the allied health fields (occupational therapy, respiratory therapy, surgical tech, ultrasound tech, etc.).
  4. by   ugoumeh
    Wormie,

    How long have you been looking for a job? Have you considered working in rural areas?

    Reason I'm asking is because I'm planning to pursue my BSN next year and want to get a better idea of the job market.
  5. by   pers
    This depends a lot on your area and what sorts of positions are available. At my facility they are currently hiring secretaries, PBX operators, transporters and telemetry techs. None of these positions require any experience and offer on the job training but experience will obviously help you get the job. There are also positions for CNA/PCA but that does require either certification, experience or a portion of nursing school.
  6. by   Wormie
    Ugoumeh: I have looked for jobs in big cities and rural areas. However, I have mostly confined my search to California, Oregon and the East Coast. I got my interim permit in March and started looking then. I got my official license at the end of May so that is when I started the serious search. I have applied for more than 50 positions. Most of my nursing school friends are also not having any luck.
  7. by   ugoumeh
    Wormie: Sorry to hear. I hope you find something soon.
  8. by   reina*
    thanks for the ideas
  9. by   rshenry
    I have been licensed since May. No job as an RN, not even a bite. Thank GOD I have a great paying non-nursing job until I can get a job offer.
  10. by   PetiteOpRN
    Quote from Wormie
    Reina,
    After completing your nursing fundamentals class you can work as a nursing assistant in the hospital setting. In fact, I would strongly advise you do this because it will help set you up for employment as an RN once you have completed your education. I wish I had done this. I am a new RN and despite doing an externship, I am unable to find a job. Don't believe the media hype about the nursing shortage. If I were you, I would look into some of the allied health fields (occupational therapy, respiratory therapy, surgical tech, ultrasound tech, etc.).
    Surgical techs are actually very highly skilled and go through about a year of full time school and clinicals to get certified. Their program has many of the same prereqs as nursing.

    Respiratory therapy techs are also highly skilled professionals and are able to do things that are outside of the RN's scope of practice, like arterial sticks.

    Radiology techs -- again, highly skilled professionals. I believe they have a 4-year degree in order to practice.

    Ultrasound techs also have lots of training. I don't work with them as much, so I'm not sure what their training entails, but I believe there is a degree and certification to go along with it.

    My point is, the word "tech" does not mean unskilled or uneducated. It does require training and would not be appropriate for someone without training or experience.

    OP, it sounds like you are looking for a way to get your foot in the door for a critical care environment when you graduate from nursing school. You might see if you can find a job as a unit clerk in an ICU or ED. I was a unit clerk in college, and i think it is one of the hardest positions on a unit. I really does prepare you for the hectic pace of a critical care environment and helps you to develop good time management, organizational, and prioritization skills, which most new grads struggle with.
  11. by   ugoumeh
    Reina, you can also try volunteering at your local hospital while attending school. This would be a good way to get your foot in the door as well.
  12. by   reina*
    thanks for the great information

close