"The Disruptive Behavior of Doctors" - page 4

I am currently reading a book on nursing careers that talks about "the disruptive behavior of doctors." I'm sure we all have stories! Can you tell me of ways in which doctors' behaviors have made... Read More

  1. by   DaFreak71
    When I was in my second semester of nursing school--I did the unthinkable. It was the end of the clinical day and all the students were feverishly charting so we wouldn't get into trouble for being late to post-conference. I was finishing up my charting and a doctor came up to the desk and asked who had chart X. I said I did. He said "I need it". I said "Just one minute...I've got like two sentences to write". There were about five or so classmates standing next to me and they all let out a collective gasp. The doctor stood there for a second, not quite knowing how to react and he said "No problem...looks like you're doing a good job". He said it in a genuine manner, which caused my classmates to collectively stare wide eyed as though they had never seen an "impetuous" comment replied to with such respect. Of course (because I'm really sarcastic) I took it a step farther and said "If you doctors worked on your penmanship a bit more, we wouldn't end up spending half the day trying to decipher it". He laughed and said "Yes ma'am--I'll work on that". HA HA! What a cool guy. We exchanged sarcastic smiles with each other and it was fun for both of us. Of course my classmates brought it up in post-conference because they thought I was incredibly rude. I told the instructor what transpired and she laughed too. So I had a double win that day....stood my ground in a nice and funny way and denied my classmates the satisfaction of getting me in trouble. Yes...that was a good day. A rarity in nursing school.
  2. by   DaFreak71
    Quote from AtomicWoman
    I once had a jerk attorney come over to my workstation (when I worked for a law firm) and say, "Um, sweetie, you made a mistake" in an extremely condescending tone. I looked right at him and said, "My name is AtomicWoman." Then I stared him down. (I hadn't made a mistake, either, but that's another matter.) From then on, whenever Jerkenstein came needed something from me, he would say "sweetie" and then really sarcastically say, "Oh! I mean AtomicWoman!". He did this until I left the firm for unrelated reasons. He's lucky I didn't keep a brick at my workstation. :angryfire
    ROFL--Jerkenstein! I'm gonna use that one liberally.
  3. by   SoundofMusic
    What gets me are the gaggles of interns and residents who land in our nsg station every a.m. to do rounds. Doing rounds I understand, but so many of them seem to linger around, just standing there socializing amongst each other with their aromatic cups of Starbucks in hand, while I, the nurse, could only DREAM of being able to stand around socializing, much less a chance at a fresh cup of coffee during the busy morning. I sometimes just dream that perhaps ONE of them might offer ME cup, or go get one for me, as a reward for busting it all day for their patients.

    Do you EVER wonder when they are going to do this? To actually show some appreciation to nurses? It always seem to be the nursing directors who do this .. .how about the docs? Why don't doctors, as a group, devote a day or something to thanking nurses in some way for putting up with all we do?

    I also love the female residents who strut around in stilletoes and their white coats. Seems their job must not be TOO bad if they can wear high heels during rounds.
  4. by   RN1982
    Rounds in stilletos? That's kind of tacky. I think if we had more respect for our fellow nurses, we would get more respect from outside professions. I can't say that most docs do not appreciate us though. For the most part, when docs ask me for something they say thank you or if I help them with a procedure, they say thanks for your help. In rounds, they ask for my opinion and to me that means that they value what I have to say because why even bother asking me if they didn't value it.
  5. by   loveshospital
    Quote from nursekline
    I had such a bad experience with a particular doc in the ER as a nursing student (I was working there as a nurse tech). This doc would belittle me in front of everyone and anyone, including patient's. :icon_roll As nurse techs, we had to alternate between working in the ER and urgent care. If I was assigned to uc with him, he would ask other docs RIGHT in front of me and everyone else, if they would switch with him!!! I used to go in the locker room and cry about it, I had and still have no idea what I ever did to him to make him treat me as he did. I complained to my nurse manager and she said that a lot of the nurses had complained about him but that her hands were tied because the chief ER doc liked him! I LOVED working in the ER/UC but dreaded going in to work because of him. I was eventually offered a nursing position (upon graduation) in the ER (which back than was not usually offered to new grads) but refused because I would have to work with him. I regret that decision now!!!!
    That is awful,some people were just born to be mean,in my class we have a couple of mean girls who takes pray on more sweater and nicer students and they dont even have a valid reason to be so rude,I think some people are just insecure because the happy ones usually try to spread and surround themselves with positive energy!
  6. by   Duranie
    Here is a link to a MedscapeCME on this very topic--

    http://cme.medscape.com/viewprogram/19250
  7. by   tnrose
    Why do you doubt they spend time in forums like this complaining? Do you feel like it's because they are more mature, or it's because of the status you assign to someone with a MD behind their name?
  8. by   DaFreak71
    Quote from SoundofMusic
    What gets me are the gaggles of interns and residents who land in our nsg station every a.m. to do rounds. Doing rounds I understand, but so many of them seem to linger around, just standing there socializing amongst each other with their aromatic cups of Starbucks in hand, while I, the nurse, could only DREAM of being able to stand around socializing, much less a chance at a fresh cup of coffee during the busy morning. I sometimes just dream that perhaps ONE of them might offer ME cup, or go get one for me, as a reward for busting it all day for their patients. BTW--In addition to the wide variety of gourmet coffees on the unit, they also have a Starbucks in the lobby lol. I'm passing you a triple mocha with extra whipped cream (just visualize it hehe).

    Do you EVER wonder when they are going to do this? To actually show some appreciation to nurses? It always seem to be the nursing directors who do this .. .how about the docs? Why don't doctors, as a group, devote a day or something to thanking nurses in some way for putting up with all we do?

    I also love the female residents who strut around in stilletoes and their white coats. Seems their job must not be TOO bad if they can wear high heels during rounds.
    I would find that irritating as well. I know when I was a nursing student we weren't allowed to have any kind of beverages on the floor and at the end of each semester we were required to bring appreciation gifts for the R.N.'s. With regard to nurse appreciation, I feel your pain vicariously. My husband is a nurse and the job he has now is AMAZING at being appreciative toward their nurses, not because they have to for employee retention purposes, but because they are genuinely awesome people. Frequent positive feedback, always gourmet coffee ready at any given moment, they notice and reward nurses for being helpful toward each other, for being a positive person in the work place, getting positive feedback from patients/families, working extra if someone is sick, etc.

    Yeah, it would be nice if docs or interns would at least recognize our efforts (and some do!) but it isn't frequent. In the past I would read a doctors forum on another site and there was a thread about how "funny" it was that they don't bother reading the charting we do. Here's a novel thought: maybe if they read our notes it would make asking certain questions superfluous. But then again, I tend to live in a dream world LOL.
    Last edit by DaFreak71 on May 3, '09 : Reason: added more info
  9. by   deeone6603
    their behaviour i not only disruptive but somewhat irritatingly 'bossy' atimes. anybody out there who can give me a good recipe for handling doctors bossy behaviour in a calm and subtle way.
  10. by   blueheaven
    LOL I could write a book on this one!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  11. by   blueheaven
    Then again, I have witnessed nurses who for no reason except that they are +++holes too who have ripped docs, been rude and nasty, not in the least helpful and plain horrible! I work in a teaching hospital. What are some of our coworkers teaching the new kids on the block?

    So it cuts both ways. We recently had a attending (who was God) and a group of residents, interns etc that was absolutely awful. They picked up the attitude of the attending. Needless to say, at the end of the month they passed on to the next team that we were really bad to work with. They came into their rotation thinking that we were all a bunch of nasty people. They quickly found out that wasn't true and we had a wonderful month.
  12. by   netglow
    Dontcha hate it when you have a complex case... stuff isn't working, nobody really wants the patient...you've got like 4 docs in on it, tho they don't want to be... and you cannot get one to put in a new orders for possibly better med management?! It's always... maybe I'll put a note for Dr. so and so (repeated by all). Nobody wants responsibility. You feel like a hitchhiker trying to get a ride.
  13. by   Isabelle49
    You might want to check the JAHCO site (joint commission). Not long ago there was a very good article about disruptive doctor behavior and how this leads to nursing errors. One of the goals of the joint commission was to address this issue, since many patients' lives have been endangered by the effects of a doctor's actions on a nurse.

    Isabelle

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