Do you use your pda/smartphone at work?

Posted
by Aly529 Aly529 Member

I'm reading more and more info about nurses using apps on their devices to help them do a better job and as a Blackberry lover I can see how having info at your fingertips can be helpful BUT how realistic is it?

Do nurses really use their smartphones at work?

Are they allowed on the floor? Encouraged?

What about during clinicals?

I think I would feel weird pulling out my Blackberry to look for info on a drug *even though there are MANY apps with really comprehensive guides*

Thanks!

WSU_Ally_RN, BSN, RN

Specializes in MICU for 4 years, now PICU for 3 years!. Has 7 years experience. 459 Posts

I have and Ipod touch and feel lost without it at work! I love having so many apps at my fingertips! I can look up drugs, diseases, or treatments when my patients and family's ask, without having to leave the room.

BluegrassRN

BluegrassRN

Has 14 years experience. 1,188 Posts

I just tell them that I have a reference on my phone, and I'll look it up. People know that phones are more than phones.

Chin up

Chin up

Specializes in Med surg, LTC, Administration. Has 26 years experience. 694 Posts

Absolutely and the NP'ers use them too. In fact, the new iPhone 4 is everywhere in my facility right now.

ValDonovan

ValDonovan

78 Posts

I had an IPod touch and now the IPhone. I use mine all the time, I am currently in clinicals and it makes researching drug way easier than having to carry around a bulky drug guide.

Best of luck!!!

Aly529

Aly529

139 Posts

Thanks everyone! I'm glad to hear it's not frowned upon because in this day and age a smartphone IS the easiest and fastest way to get info. Hopefully my clinicals will allow my Blackberry to accompany me. :specs:

flyingchange

flyingchange

Specializes in MPH Student Fall/14, Emergency, Research. Has 2+ years experience. 291 Posts

I used my BlackBerry to look up a drug and my clinical instructor lost it on me.... user beware.

Aly529

Aly529

139 Posts

I used my BlackBerry to look up a drug and my clinical instructor lost it on me.... user beware.

Really? :confused: That's too bad. I guess some see this as unprofessional and unreliable. IE. If it's not in a book, it's not real? :down: I find it innovative and productive.

ValDonovan

ValDonovan

78 Posts

I guess it depends on your facility policies. They don't want nurses walking up and down the halls looking like they are texting. But I certainly think they are a HUGE assett in our field.

Val

BobcatRN

BobcatRN

Specializes in Med/surg, L&D, ICU briefly, Informatics. Has 7 years experience. 15 Posts

We aren't allowed to have our phones near us. We could be reprimanded, even fired. Yet, docs are on theirs at the nurse's station (non business related) ALL THE TIME... It's a total crock because I do use mine for more than the actual phone.

RescueNinja

RescueNinja

Specializes in ICU, ER. Has 1 years experience. 369 Posts

Absolutely! At my LTC facility no "electronic devices" are allowed, but I explained to my DON that a) I refuse to work without my cell in case of emergencies and b) I use it for nursing reference like drug calculations and whatnot all the time and he was ok with it.

Emergency RN

Emergency RN

Specializes in ED, CTSurg, IVTeam, Oncology. Has 30 years experience. 544 Posts

I'm reading more and more info about nurses using apps on their devices to help them do a better job and as a Blackberry lover I can see how having info at your fingertips can be helpful BUT how realistic is it?

Do nurses really use their smartphones at work?

Are they allowed on the floor? Encouraged?

What about during clinicals?

I think I would feel weird pulling out my Blackberry to look for info on a drug *even though there are MANY apps with really comprehensive guides*

Thanks!

I was like... HUH? Why feel weird?

Frankly, in this day and age, IMHO it is considered almost de rigueur to have a pocket device with answers at your fingertips at the bedside. Sure, the device can have multiple purposes (eg. a stethoscope can be used for safe cracking too); but at the bedside, it's usage is understood to be for professional reasons. That is, you're pulling out the Blackberry to obtain clinical knowledge, and presumably not to gossip text or violate HIPAA by taking photos of the patient. So it should not be a problem at all.