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direct entry NP vs. BSN-NP

Posted
dcwang dcwang (Member)

I've been accepted to ABSN programs and am considering becoming an NP or CRNA.

I've a few questions which perhaps some student nurse practitioners/nurse practitioners could answer.

1. Since many people these days are becoming NP, would the market become saturated?

2. Does entering direct entry NP mean harder to find a job than someone who gets a BSN then goes for NP program? I'm not sure, but some direct entry NP programs don't seem to award you a BSN/RN first? Is it important to get the BSN/RN?

3. Would obtaining an ABSN open more opportunities for me instead of a direct-entry NP program?

RNjazzie12

Specializes in NICU, Newborn Nursery, Pediatrics. Has 4 years experience.

Greetings!!

I just recently applied to a few NP programs here in Texas and feel that I can offer some assistance!

To answer your first question, I think there is a strong market for Nurse Practitioners. You have to be aware that are a variety of specialties as a Nurse Practitioner. And NPs are of great necessity in rural areas where healthcare access is limited. And with new healthcare laws of Nurse Practitioners and their scope of practice the need for NPs are of great importance. Also, the great thing about healthcare is that it's an evolving industry with tons of room for growth.

2. As far as this question is concerned, in the end you are being awarded an MSN and the right to practice as an NP when and after you pass your state boards regardless if you do an ADN- to -direct entry or traditional BSN. In my personal experience I went the BSN route and worked a couple of years to gain experience to use in advance practice. I feel it's best this way because you truly grasp what nursing is all about when you are submerged into that setting 12hrs a day, 3 days a week. But I know of a few people who went straight to their MSN post BSN graduation.

3. I believe the opportunities would be the same. I believe that a lot of this is weighed on the individual. If you are determined to become an NP, then do so and be great at it. Don't do it for the title or the money, do it because you know this is your calling and you see this best fit as your career goals. Like I mentioned before, I took the BSN route because I started working towards my bachelor's degree right after high school graduation. Not everyone has the same path, but if an employer understands your dedication and compassion for this field then your opportunities are endless.

Can I ask are you currently in an RN program? I can't give much info as far as the CRNA route (not my specialty) but hope the NP information helps!

Larry3373

Specializes in Critical Care; Recovery. Has 2 years experience.

I'd like to think that the experience I have working in the hospital as an RN has helped me tremendously in pursuing a career as a np. To be clear I will be starting school in September for the acute care/fnp dual role which requires at least a year of critical care before applying. Since this is designed for ER specialty, nursing experience is required. Look up nurse practitioners- the providers of the future: Renee P. Mcloud (2013) on YouTube.com. I think this video will will thoroughly answer your questions.

RNjazzie12

Specializes in NICU, Newborn Nursery, Pediatrics. Has 4 years experience.

I'd like to think that the experience I have working in the hospital as an RN has helped me tremendously in pursuing a career as a np. To be clear I will be starting school in September for the acute care/fnp dual role which requires at least a year of critical care before applying. Since this is designed for ER specialty, nursing experience is required. Look up nurse practitioners- the providers of the future: Renee P. Mcloud (2013) on YouTube.com. I think this video will will thoroughly answer your questions.

Having experience is always a plus! I will look up that video as well, always good to know more info on this growing field.

BDWilliams09

Specializes in critical care, ED. Has 6 years experience.

It depends on your long term goals and where you would like to work. Most direct entry programs are designed to prepare you for primary care (FNP). I am told by the programs trying to get the money from students that studies show no difference in quality or care from experienced RN getting NP vs Direct entry. I find this very hard to believe. I know I worked at the bedside for 6 years before going to NP school and I have a hard time believing this experience does not give me a huge advantage. My specialty is AGACNP which requires acute care experience. If you wish to work in acute care setting most programs will require you to have a minimum of 1 year experience.

RNjazzie12

Specializes in NICU, Newborn Nursery, Pediatrics. Has 4 years experience.

It depends on your long term goals and where you would like to work. Most direct entry programs are designed to prepare you for primary care (FNP). I am told by the programs trying to get the money from students that studies show no difference in quality or care from experienced RN getting NP vs Direct entry. I find this very hard to believe. I know I worked at the bedside for 6 years before going to NP school and I have a hard time believing this experience does not give me a huge advantage. My specialty is AGACNP which requires acute care experience. If you wish to work in acute care setting most programs will require you to have a minimum of 1 year experience.

I agree, if you're going into an acute care NP program, having acute care experience should be a must and will only work towards your advantage and success as an acute care NP. I have also heard that same study that having zero experience is equivalent to an RN with experience going to primary care, I guess it's just up to that nurse and his/her career goals and the schools requirements!

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

I agree, if you're going into an acute care NP program, having acute care experience should be a must and will only work towards your advantage and success as an acute care NP. I have also heard that same study that having zero experience is equivalent to an RN with experience going to primary care, I guess it's just up to that nurse and his/her career goals and the schools requirements!

I would like to see those studies that are mentioned so often and would hope they are at least current as one I saw posted here was from the 90s. People seem to agree that for certain specialties it is important to have RN experience and not others which I don't feel is logical especially if all those studies we hear so much about haven't researched outcomes of each specialty. In my experience as a provider on an inpatient unit where I am privy to area NPs patient's outpatient regimens I absolutely feel there is a difference in the quality of prescribing for those who have actual experience before becoming an advanced practice nurse but thats not official, just my day to day experience and opinion.