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Denver School of Nursing

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Specializes in Orthopedics. Has 14 years experience.

Anyone out there going to or planning on going to the Denver School of Nursing ... particularly their "upper division" RN program?

Just wondering your thoughts, esp. on the fact that they are not yet accredited as a baccalaureate program. Is that a concern for anyone who is a student or soon-to-be student?

michellemybelle

Specializes in ICU.

I've applied to two Denver schools--Regis University and the University of Colorado Health Science Center as a BSN transfer student. When I read your post, I was really surprised that there was another nursing school in the Denver area. But, when I went to the website, I was a little leary...they are not accredited by the NLNAC or any other similar organization. Even if they are a new school and are awaiting accreditation, they should at least mention this on their website, as I've seen it on many other new schools offering a BSN. I would be really careful; if they are not accredited by some national nursing organization (NLNAC or AACN--something like this?) it may be hard for you to find a job once you graduate.

Be careful, and best of luck to you,

Michelle :)

adventuregirl, MSN, NP

Specializes in Orthopedics. Has 14 years experience.

Michelle, thanks for the info. DSN states that they've been granted "Phase III Approval" for their program to allow grads to take the NCLEX-RN through the Colorado State Board of Nursing. I would think that passing the NCLEX would be good enough for getting a job ... maybe not. I just emailed the Colorado State Board of Nursing, as well as the other two organizations you mentioned (NLNAC and AACN) to find out more. So, we'll see what info/advice they have to offer.

I have also been looking into the DSON upper division program and have the same concerns about the lack of accredidation and how it would effect my ability to get a job after the program. Another downside to the program is that they have very little financial aid avaiable, and the program is around $30,000. It sounds like you can get enough financial aid to pay for the program but not much extra for living expenses while you're in school. Please share any information you all find out about the program. It's an interesting option, but it's kinda scary thinking about spending all that money and having trouble getting a job when your done. :confused:

adventuregirl, MSN, NP

Specializes in Orthopedics. Has 14 years experience.

i'm not concerned with getting a job, esp. after passing the nclex. i honestly don't think it will be a problem. also, with dson being a new school, they want to have a good pass rate to look good. i spoke with their dir. of ed (who was previously an instructor at regis) and the program sounds great. i'm more concerned about continuing on for a master's, since most nursing programs require an bsn to get your msn or np. i rec'd an email back from a nursing education consultant with the co board of nursing who verified my thinking. she also said that if the program doesn't receive approval to grant a bsn that you might be able to have your transcripts evaluated and to keep copies of all your syllabi from each of your classes. i think my next action is to contact a few grad schools and see what they have to say.

the tuition stinks, but to me it's better than waiting an extra year making peanuts (as i quit my better paying job - which i hated - to finish up prerequisites and in the meantime work at an assisted living facility with alzheimer's residents - which i love!). no financial aid but i luckily own a house and can get a home equity loan where you can write-off the interest.

i'd love to have more options for schools, but greeley, pueblo and uchs are out due to the commute (i go by bus - i prefer not to drive), metro was an option but they're accelerate program is in limbo until they evaluate it and find a clinical site. that leaves dson as i don't want to be put on a 3 year wait list at a community college. so ... we'll see what i find out after a little more research. :uhoh3:

michellemybelle

Specializes in ICU.

I went back and looked at the website for DON and was further surprised; are they granting degrees? I never saw anything that said ADN or BSN, instead they call them "programs" like their "4-Year Upper Division Program." I'm glad you're researching it further and would love to hear what you find out.

Good luck!

Michelle :)

adventuregirl, MSN, NP

Specializes in Orthopedics. Has 14 years experience.

are they granting degrees?

No, not as of yet. They have applied through the Commission of Higher Ed and I received email back from the office that is handling it. I'm told it takes 2-4 years to become accredited to grant degrees, though they are accredited as a private occupational school. So, you can take the NCLEX, but you won't receive a degree as of yet.

I did find out that UCSHC has a RN-MSN program that allows you to continue on for a Master's w/o a BSN. There are also several programs out there that will allow you to continue on with just a BS instead of a BSN. That was good news for me, I guess. I'm still trying to find out more from grad schools in CO.

innovativemurse

Specializes in CVSICU, case mgmt., Psych, education. Has 9 years experience.

I think it's smart to not pursue this right now. With all of the hard work you put into your education you want to make sure you are getting a degree. I have heard very little about this school, however I do know this but don't know if it has anything to do with the program...one of the associate professors from this school is back at UCHSC teaching, which leads me to believe that things didn't work out for her at this institution. What degree are you looking to complete if I may ask? Maybe I can offer some assistance.

I have read all of your discussions and I'm with adventure girl...are you going to start the program? I think I am going to go in Friday and just do it. Even if they can't offer the BSN by the time we graduate we can at least be practicing RN's. I like the idea of the RN-MSN program at UCHSC. I have researched all of this for months and I have the same concerns, but as long as we can at least get our RN we should be fine, right???

I'm not concerned with getting a job, esp. after passing the NCLEX. I honestly don't think it will be a problem. Also, with DSON being a new school, they want to have a good pass rate to look good. I spoke with their Dir. of Ed (who was previously an instructor at Regis) and the program sounds great. I'm more concerned about continuing on for a Master's, since most nursing programs require an BSN to get your MSN or NP. I rec'd an email back from a nursing education consultant with the CO Board of Nursing who verified my thinking. She also said that if the program doesn't receive approval to grant a BSN that you might be able to have your transcripts evaluated and to keep copies of all your syllabi from each of your classes. I think my next action is to contact a few grad schools and see what they have to say.

The tuition stinks, but to me it's better than waiting an extra year making peanuts (as I quit my better paying job - which I hated - to finish up prerequisites and in the meantime work at an assisted living facility with Alzheimer's residents - which I love!). No financial aid but I luckily own a house and can get a home equity loan where you can write-off the interest.

I'd love to have more options for schools, but Greeley, Pueblo and UCHS are out due to the commute (I go by bus - I prefer not to drive), Metro was an option but they're accelerate program is in limbo until they evaluate it and find a clinical site. That leaves DSON as I don't want to be put on a 3 year wait list at a community college. So ... we'll see what I find out after a little more research. :uhoh3:

I am on several waiting list and fed up! So i decided to go to DSN and give it a shot. Right now i am a little scared about the program because it is new. However, i do like the idea of starting clinicals in January. I was interested to know if you (adventuregirl) have found any information about grad schools. I am somewhat relieved to know that i am not the only one a little nervous about the program. I think i am going to do it though. While it is a lot of money, i am ready to start school now, as i already have all my pre-req's done. Anyway thanks for the information you have already posted.

adventuregirl, MSN, NP

Specializes in Orthopedics. Has 14 years experience.

I am on several waiting list and fed up! So i decided to go to DSN and give it a shot. Right now i am a little scared about the program because it is new. However, i do like the idea of starting clinicals in January. I was interested to know if you (adventuregirl) have found any information about grad schools. I am somewhat relieved to know that i am not the only one a little nervous about the program. I think i am going to do it though. While it is a lot of money, i am ready to start school now, as i already have all my pre-req's done. Anyway thanks for the information you have already posted.

Let's see ... what have I found out about grad schools ... some will only accept coursework from accredited schools, however some will admit you provisionally. There are also grad schools that offer RN-MSN options (UCHSC & Beth-El), as well as BS-MSN options (I don't think there are any in CO though). I'm still looking into accelerated BSN options - specifically Beth El and crossing my fingers Metro will offer another cohort next year. However, if nothing pans out, DSON is my next best option as I don't want to wait yet another year to start school. The waiting is killing me too!

Feel free to email me personally with any other specific questions, concerns, etc. lissedh@msn.com

innovativemurse

Specializes in CVSICU, case mgmt., Psych, education. Has 9 years experience.

I actually attend UCHSC and I'm almost finished. It is my personal and professional opinion that you should attend a school that is accredited and/or contact the board of nursing directly about this school. If you want to attend grad school whether it be hear or anywhere, I am sure there will be concerns about where you received your undergrad. UCHSC has an accelerated program for those who have another degree, they just started it this year. I know the waiting lists are long, but keep applying and apply out of state if you have to. I came here to go to school from the east coast. Just get through nursing school...that's all you have to do. It's tough but worth it because you can then focus on what kind of nursing you want to do and have a more "tailored" experience in grad school. I have heard through the "grape vine" that this school wasn't doing so well and one of the professors who was teaching came back to UCHSC after just a few months. This professor may still have some affiliation to the school, but I'll have to ask. Not trying to take the wind out of your sails, just making sure that you have covered all the bases. Good luck. If you guys have any other questions let me know, I am pretty well in the mix when it comes to schools and programs as I have researched a ton.

adventuregirl, MSN, NP

Specializes in Orthopedics. Has 14 years experience.

Phatlipboardz - thanks so much for your info and concern. I have been contacting numerous people this past week, one of which has been the nursing ed consultant at the CO Board of Nursing. I still have yet to speak with her over the phone in more detail (we've been emailing), hopefully in the next few days. I've also contacted several grad schools in CO and CA and even if DSON doesn't get accredited within the time I've completed the RN program, so long as I pass the NCLEX and get registered, I can go to grad school. My choices may be more limited without having a BSN, but I'll still be able to do it so long as I have my RN.

I live in Boulder, have a house, and a husband. This limits my options for school (as I can't uproot that easily), esp. since my husband just landed a new job he really loves. I also don't want to wait much longer as "time is $". I quit my better paying job (which I didn't like anyway) to finish pre-reqs and get experience as a CNA. DSON is still my Plan B, with a few other accelerated programs being Plan A. However, given my undergrad GPA is just under a 3.0, it makes getting into certain schools more difficult. I didn't apply to UCHSC since I kept hearing how hard it was to get in, but I'm planning on applying to Beth-El. Hope they're not strict on the GPA thing, but I'll give it a shot. However, going there would require me moving for 16 months - which would cost me more, both in $ and my relationship. I think my husband and I could do it, but I'd be very sad. My only other hope would be Metro State's accelerated program ... if they start another class.

All this makes DSON a good option for me. I don't think I'd be shooting myself in the foot (as I'd be able to work as an RN), however it might make grad school a little trickier, but definitely not impossible. I am curious to what that professor has to say, if you get the chance to speak with her.

innovativemurse

Specializes in CVSICU, case mgmt., Psych, education. Has 9 years experience.

Sounds like you have a lot going on there. I can understand as I uprooted to come to school, I have a wife and we have a place in Boulder. This is the tough, but once you are in and get this part done, you will have a big chunk of your education behind you. Don't let the GPA discourage you from applying because you never know what could happen. My advice is to get friendly with the admissions department and make sure they remember you by name if possible. Tell them how much you want this and that they should really consider you for their program. Go in with an open mind about the type of nursing you want to do, because I have seen so many people think they wanted to be in a certain area of nursing and then realize that's the last place they want to be. If you want this, then you will have to do everything you can to make it happen. It will pay off in the end. I will be uprooting again in a few months to further extend my education and pursue additional nursing avenues. The sacrifices we make. Good luck and keep going until you've reached your goal.

rnphd2b

Specializes in Gerontology, Critical Care, ER, Educatio. Has 40 years experience.

I just heard that DSN got permission in Nov to grant the BSN degree?????? Anybody else hear that?

I just heard that DSN got permission in Nov to grant the BSN degree?????? Anybody else hear that?

Edwards resident launches nursing school

Jeanette Blair isn't a woman with a natural aptitude for leisure, which explains why the Edwards resident is starting a new nursing school in Denver's Lodo district.

Denver School of Nursing, a division of the Professional Education Corporation, will operate as a post-secondary school offering several levels of nursing programs.

Blair said Colorado is currently experiencing a 13 percent shortage of nurses. She said the nursing shortage in Colorado could reach 31 percent by 2008.

"The Denver School of Nursing has been founded to provide additional resources to help address this healthcare personnel shortage issue," said Blair.

Blair is founder and president of Denver School of Nursing. Previously, she was the owner of Denver Paralegal Institute, a nationally recognized and accredited institution in paralegal education.

Blair said the school's progress would not have been possible without chief executive Michael Schledorn and Dr. Gail Armstrong.

Schledorn is the chief operating officer of Professional Education Corporation, the umbrella company for the Denver School of Nursing, and the nursing school's director. Schledorn has more than 18 years of experience in private schools and a masters in education from Texas Christian University.

"Michael is a multi-talented and very experienced professional whose many skills will assure the success of our educational programs," said Blair.

Armstrong is the director of nursing education. She earned her nursing doctorate at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in 1995, and has been an assistant professor at the School of Nursing at University of Colorado Health Sciences Center since 2000.

"We are extremely excited that Dr. Armstrong will be leading the academic development and mission of the Denver School of Nursing," said Blair.

New nursing school

• Denver School of Nursing offers a nursing Rrfresher program and a certified nurse aide program, which have been in session since January 2004.

• The Colorado State Board of Nursing also gave the school the green light to offer upper level programs for registered nurse training, a registered nurse associate degree program, and a licensed practical nurse program.

• The licensed practical nurse course begins June 21. The upper level registered nurse program is scheduled to start in September, followed by the associates degree registered nurse program in 2005.

• In addition to the nursing refresher program, the school is developing a nursing aide program, a practical nursing program and a registered nursing program.

• The Denver School of Nursing is located on the corner of Market Street and 19th Street in the "Lodo" district of downtown Denver.

I currently attend the Denver School of Nursing and have almost completed one year there. Just a warning, the school is VERY expensive and it is not worth the high cost. It has been unable to hold onto staff, including the founders of the school! The faculty has left. I have one teacher for all four of my classes! They are unorganized when it comes to clinicals sites and dates and will tell you whatever it takes to get you to enroll. For example, I was told I would have ONE clinical day a week when in fact, at times, I had had to go to clinicals three days a week, class two days a week and I work full time also. I just wanted potential students to be very aware of these facts before they sign up for a $15,000 a year school.

rnphd2b

Specializes in Gerontology, Critical Care, ER, Educatio. Has 40 years experience.

I too am a student of DSN.......the founder has not left who are you talking about "Infullbloom1"? The founder Jeannette Blair is still around as far as I know.

I am enjoying my classes and look forward to getting my BSN in June of 2006. The classes are small compared to any other school in town and as a new program things are going well.

Sure there are some bumps but what would you expect from a program the began it's first LPN class in July of 2004? I am happy here as are many of my fellow classmates.

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