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CRNA vs NP ???

SRNA   (3,717 Views 5 Comments)
by dan_popa dan_popa (New) New

257 Profile Views; 1 Post

Hello all, I have been thinking for a while about advancing my education. I am a 31 YO male and live in Phoenix AZ. I figure if I don't do something now, it will get that much harder down the road.

I am hitting a road block.

I keep debating about NP vs CRNA vs DNP in nursing anesthesia.

Which one do you think has the best future outlook and why?

What is the specialty with a decent amount of "call"? (I am currently on call 20 days a month... TOO MUCH)

What is the difference between DNP in nursing anesthesia and CRNA? Any pay or job differences?

thank you, have a blessed day

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70 Posts; 1,717 Profile Views

DNP vs MSN in anesthesia is the educational degree. It has nothing to do with obtaining your license as a CRNA.

Either way, you are still a CRNA, and there is no current pay difference between the two.

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traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNS and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

166 Articles; 21,045 Posts; 191,573 Profile Views

Moved to SRNA forum

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Boomer MS, RN has 17 years experience and specializes in Med Surg/ICU/Psych/Emergency/CEN/retired.

509 Posts; 4,584 Profile Views

Hello all, I have been thinking for a while about advancing my education. I am a 31 YO male and live in Phoenix AZ. I figure if I don't do something now, it will get that much harder down the road.

I am hitting a road block.

I keep debating about NP vs CRNA vs DNP in nursing anesthesia.

Which one do you think has the best future outlook and why?

What is the specialty with a decent amount of "call"? (I am currently on call 20 days a month... TOO MUCH)

What is the difference between DNP in nursing anesthesia and CRNA? Any pay or job differences?

thank you, have a blessed day

If you want to be a CRNA, please be aware that these programs are very competitive. Some programs, the U of Maryland for example, awards a DNP for their graduates. Others do not, not yet anyway. So a CRNA is a CRNA. You aren't a different CRNA whether you get a MSN or a DNP. I would predict that most CRNA programs will progress toward awarding a DNP in the near future. This may mean, however, a longer program. Either way, it is highly competitive. NP programs are not easy either. You will need a BSN to be admitted into an NP program. Depending on the academic institution, difficulty for admission will vary. If your goal is to be a CRNA, many schools want ICU experience in a major academic center. Competitive applicants have at least five years. The better prepared you are the better, as these programs are intense. The need for NPs in the future is going to increase. CRNAs will be needed too as they are paid less than an anesthesiologist. It's all about money, isn't it? What do you want to do? There are so many NP tracts to consider. CRNA is a whole other species. If you have a BSN, you're already primed. Are they any NPs or CRNAs you can chat with? The roles are very different, IMO, so it might take some investigating on your part. I would guess that CRNAs make more money than NPs. How much call a CRNA takes depends on the group or organization for which he/she works. For this much time and investment, I would hope you like what you do. A recent CRNA grad I know said she has her "dream job" in a VA hospital in SF. She is ecstatic!

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chemokine specializes in ICU.

35 Posts; 1,399 Profile Views

As a CRNA, you can choose a job that offers the call schedule you like. If you don't want any call, there are jobs for that. If you really want to be in a specific city then there may only be a few groups servicing that city and you may have a more limited choice regarding call and other aspects of the job.

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