Jump to content

Community College or State University??!!

Students   (2,304 Views 13 Comments)
by Nurse_Rae Nurse_Rae (Member)

3,465 Visitors; 40 Posts

advertisement

So, which one do you suggest??

  1. 1. So, which one do you suggest??

    • ADN to BSN
    • Straight BSN at University

21 members have participated

Hello All!! I am unsure about my school path, and was wondering if anyone had some advice. I have been a LPN since 2009, and have completed all pre-reqs for nursing school. I have been attending the community college in my area (HCC) and was planning on applying to their LPN-RN transition program. It would take me 3 semesters; starting summer 2013.

The problem is, the hospital I want to work at only hires RNs with a BSN. I know there are ADN-BSN online programs, but I am not good with online classes. :no:

I have considered just finishing my 60 credit hours and graduating with an AA, and then apply to a 4 year university like UF, USF, or UCF. I know they are competitive, but I do have experience as a LPN. I also have a GPA of 3.6 at the moment. I have to retake a nutrition class that I got a D in (an online class btw!!!!:madface:) bcus I missed the final exam deadline by a few hours. Once I retake it (and get the A I know that I will earn), then my GPA will jump up to 3.8! :woot:

I have not talked with an academic advisor about it, and I will now have to wait until after the holidays to do so. I was wondering if anyone else has done the AA to BSN route, or has known someone who has done it. I have not met anyone who did it, so I am worried if it is even possible! Any and all advice is welcomed. Thanks!!! (p.s. sorry for the super long post!)

Edited by Joe V
spacing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hodgieRN has 10 years experience and works as a RN.

11,719 Visitors; 643 Posts

I did the ADN to BSN route and had the same thoughts for those options. I actually went to HCC too! There some factors to consider...

Time- Are you looking for the fastest route or needing to factor in working full-time while in school. I went to HCC b/c I needed the quickest route to make money. It was two years. You are already a nurse, so you are making money, but you will be in school longer at the university. However, in the long run, the BSN route is quicker because you get everything done in 4 years. ADN is 2 years on top the already 2 years at HCC. Plus, whatever time you spend awaiting application to the BSN. I don't know if you are going to change positions once you get your RN or BSN. The ADN-BSN route might actually be 4-5 years or even 6 if you work and wait, which is what i did.

Second, would you want to better options to get your BSN at your own pace or at the pace of a 4 yr school? After I got my RN, I went to USF. I really liked it. They don't require you to finish in a specific time. You can't take ten years, but if you want to take one class this semester, and 4 classes next, it's fine. Colleges know that returning nurses have families, jobs, etc, so they make it flexible. With just BSN, you have to follow the program to an extent. They give you a timeline and you stick with it. I'm sure you can hold off for a semester here or there, but they have to have students go through clinicals and fill seats. It's not as flexible.

One down side is RN-BSN is it's a lot of online courses. Almost all of it. I only had one in-class semester. At USF, classes like ethics, research, management, and even community health was all online. The upside is no clinicals (except community). It's all theory, exams, and papers online. For 4 yr BSN, there will be more classes in the classroom, but I think there are still online classes. Not sure if you can opt for in-class courses, but I would imagine it would be more of the typical college setting.

Finances - HCC is far cheaper than USF. When I went, credits were like a third less than USF. If you work at a hospital, then they should have tuition reimbursement. You will need to check if there is a cut off. It changes. I know some that had pretty much everything paid for and some who got like $2000 /semester (which i'm guessing is half of the total). You should be able to qualify for the education tax exemption if you have reimbursement ( or anything left that you pay for...would have to check that).

Check the differences between colleges for RN to BSN. USF is very flexible. St-pete College gives you a strict timeline to follow. My sister went to St Pete and she had to take 9 credits each semester for RN to BSN. Couldn't change anything. You are in for 9 credits or you sit the semester out. USF lets you do whatever (or at least did). Not sure about UF.

Next is GPA and getting in. You have a great GPA. The 4 year requires a 3.0 to apply, but many are applying with much higher and their are limited seats. With RN to BSN, the GPA requirement is lower. I think a 2.5. They don't want to turn away potential money for people who have already established themselves as nurses who passed the exam. Plus with RN to BSN their is no limited seating. You have the requirements to apply....and you are in. BUT, that's b/c it's all online :( They can take so many more students b/c they email you the lecture and correlate the online exams. They can have a ton of students with the help of graduate assistants and adjunct professors. The 4 yr is a lot more strict getting in...at least for USF.

Going RN to BSN can totally be done and you don't to worry about going that route if you are considering it. BSN is quicker but the options for RN to BSN is great. Schools love RN to BSN b/c the students are nurses already. They can teach in a way that doesn't include basic stuff. Plus, almost all of the Rn to BSN classes are open to RN's only (except assessment). They can spend time on specific things without the worry of students not understanding basic nursing skills. Even our assessment lab was RN's only and spent time on advanced assessments as the ARNP students. We didn't go over foley insertion or lung sounds but we did go over differential diagnosis.

I hope this helps. Let me know if have any more questions. If you do decide to go to HCC or USF, they are both awesome schools.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3,465 Visitors; 40 Posts

I did the ADN to BSN route and had the same thoughts for those options. I actually went to HCC too! There some factors to consider...

Time- Are you looking for the fastest route or needing to factor in working full-time while in school. I went to HCC b/c I needed the quickest route to make money. It was two years. You are already a nurse, so you are making money, but you will be in school longer at the university. However, in the long run, the BSN route is quicker because you get everything done in 4 years. ADN is 2 years on top the already 2 years at HCC. Plus, whatever time you spend awaiting application to the BSN. I don't know if you are going to change positions once you get your RN or BSN. The ADN-BSN route might actually be 4-5 years or even 6 if you work and wait, which is what i did.

Second, would you want to better options to get your BSN at your own pace or at the pace of a 4 yr school? After I got my RN, I went to USF. I really liked it. They don't require you to finish in a specific time. You can't take ten years, but if you want to take one class this semester, and 4 classes next, it's fine. Colleges know that returning nurses have families, jobs, etc, so they make it flexible. With just BSN, you have to follow the program to an extent. They give you a timeline and you stick with it. I'm sure you can hold off for a semester here or there, but they have to have students go through clinicals and fill seats. It's not as flexible.

One down side is RN-BSN is it's a lot of online courses. Almost all of it. I only had one in-class semester. At USF, classes like ethics, research, management, and even community health was all online. The upside is no clinicals (except community). It's all theory, exams, and papers online. For 4 yr BSN, there will be more classes in the classroom, but I think there are still online classes. Not sure if you can opt for in-class courses, but I would imagine it would be more of the typical college setting.

Finances - HCC is far cheaper than USF. When I went, credits were like a third less than USF. If you work at a hospital, then they should have tuition reimbursement. You will need to check if there is a cut off. It changes. I know some that had pretty much everything paid for and some who got like $2000 /semester (which i'm guessing is half of the total). You should be able to qualify for the education tax exemption if you have reimbursement ( or anything left that you pay for...would have to check that).

Check the differences between colleges for RN to BSN. USF is very flexible. St-pete College gives you a strict timeline to follow. My sister went to St Pete and she had to take 9 credits each semester for RN to BSN. Couldn't change anything. You are in for 9 credits or you sit the semester out. USF lets you do whatever (or at least did). Not sure about UF.

Next is GPA and getting in. You have a great GPA. The 4 year requires a 3.0 to apply, but many are applying with much higher and their are limited seats. With RN to BSN, the GPA requirement is lower. I think a 2.5. They don't want to turn away potential money for people who have already established themselves as nurses who passed the exam. Plus with RN to BSN their is no limited seating. You have the requirements to apply....and you are in. BUT, that's b/c it's all online :( They can take so many more students b/c they email you the lecture and correlate the online exams. They can have a ton of students with the help of graduate assistants and adjunct professors. The 4 yr is a lot more strict getting in...at least for USF.

Going RN to BSN can totally be done and you don't to worry about going that route if you are considering it. BSN is quicker but the options for RN to BSN is great. Schools love RN to BSN b/c the students are nurses already. They can teach in a way that doesn't include basic stuff. Plus, almost all of the Rn to BSN classes are open to RN's only (except assessment). They can spend time on specific things without the worry of students not understanding basic nursing skills. Even our assessment lab was RN's only and spent time on advanced assessments as the ARNP students. We didn't go over foley insertion or lung sounds but we did go over differential diagnosis.

I hope this helps. Let me know if have any more questions. If you do decide to go to HCC or USF, they are both awesome schools.


Thank you sooo much for your response! It has taken me this long to get where I am with school because I had children right out of high school. I have 3 boys, and they are all school age now (no more baby stuff, yayy!). My mother will be retiring in a little over a year. She is the one who is mainly pushing for me to go to a university. I think it maybe be more of a pride thing, but I'm no sure. I wouldn't mind doing to RN-BSN, but I am scared about the online classes. I really do not do well with them. I somehow miss assignments or deadlines. I do better in person and able to ask questions. I like engaging with people -a nursing thing maybe? lol Was the program at SPC online? I see that UCF has a RN-BSN program in-class, but I do not know much about their school or nursing program. I guess I should point out that my goal is to eventually be a CRNA. I have to work 3-5 years in ICU before APPLYING to that program, so that's my main reason for wanting to go straight into BSN. I need to save on some time, if at all possible. I won't be done with my AA until summer classes are over, and that is too late to apply to a traditional BSN progam, as you have to be finished in spring for fall entry. If I apply to HCC I need to do so by 1/15 and I would start next summer. It would only be one year and I'd finish May 2014. I am at a crossroad here on what choice I should make. *sigh* :unsure: I have been reading other post on this website and I see how extremely difficult it is to get into the traditional BSN programs. Although, I do not know the GPAs of those who did not get in. :cautious: I wish I could see the future and know what path to choose!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hodgieRN has 10 years experience and works as a RN.

11,719 Visitors; 643 Posts

No problem! Happy to help! Oh, so the LPN-RN bridge is only one year. That makes it easier. So if you finished with your ADN May 2014, you would apply that Spring (July) and then start the RN-BSN in Fall 2014? That would make you graduate with your BSN in Fall 2016 or Spring 2017.

The BSN route would have you apply November 2013 and start Spring 2014, which would make you graduate Spring or Summer 2018. (USF)

Please note: If you are still completing your pre-requisite coursework, have not yet graduated with your ASN degree, or have not yet received your RN license, please wait to apply through SOAR. The College of Nursing can only consider applicants who meet all the minimum criteria. (This is from USF website)

[TABLE=class: MsoNormalTable]

[TR]

[TD] Term

[/TD]

[TD] SOAR Application Open

[/TD]

[TD] Deadline to Apply[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD] Spring 2013[/TD]

[TD] September 3, 20

[/TD]

[TD] November 1, 2012 5PM

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD] Summer 2013[/TD]

[TD] February 1, 2013

[/TD]

[TD] April 1, 2013 5PM

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD] Fall 2013[/TD]

[TD] May 1, 2013

[/TD]

[TD] July 1, 2013 5PM

[/TD]

[/TR]

[/TABLE]

Unless I'm missing something, RN to BSN seems faster or just the same time. I didn't take into account your that your RN would only be one calendar year (summer, fall, and spring) b/c you already have your LPN. LPN through BSN would be 3-4 years and I'm guessing just BSN would still be four? I hope I'm not missing something...If not, this would be pretty big! I would need to know if the straight up BSN is a full four years despite having the LPN (unless there are less classes needed to take).

You need to talk to an academic adviser asap! Like now, if possible, or on the first day the school opens in January before classes start and see if I'm on the right track.

The BSN program will need any pre-reqs finished before you apply and you will obviously need admission to the university before you apply to the College of Nursing.

The admission requirements for RN-BSN are pretty solid. You have this small list and I'm pretty sure you are in with no competition.

[h=3]Admission Requirements[/h] Applicants must meet the following requirements before applying for this program:

  • Acceptance at the USF undergraduate admissions office
  • An overall GPA of 2.50 or higher on all undergraduate work (excluding Associate of Science Nursing courses)
  • Associates Degree in Nursing from a regionally accredited institution or nursing diploma.
  • Evidence of current RN licensure in good standing
  • Completion of the following pre-requisite courses by the application deadline for the intended term of entry with a minimum grade of "C" in each:
    • English Composition I (3) ENC 1101
    • English Composition II (3) ENC 1102

I think SPC is all online:( My sister's doing it right now. I am not sure if they can choose to do in-class courses. I don't why they wouldn't be able to unless the class hall is nonexistent. But again, one big down side is most of RN to BSN is online. If you absolutely can't do online, you might have to just wait until you can start the BSN program or you could choose UCF...or find out if any of the universities have the in-class options. But taking everything into account, the only difference is maybe a year to start the BSN verses applying January 15 for ADN. It is a tough decision b/c after Jan 15, your option is only BSN after that. One up side to that is if you do wait and just apply to the BSN program, all is not lost. I applied and waited, but I went ahead and took courses that were required to graduate. So, when I actually started the program, I only took like 2 classes/semester b/c the others (electives, cross-cultural, history portion) were already done while waiting. Lastly, you do have to consider which you are more likely to get accepted. BSN is VERY competitive. Tons of applicants and high GPA's. HCC is also very competitive but that doesn't work, you still have BSN to apply to. If you just have BSN, that's it until you can maybe apply to HCC later and a year could go by. Is there a possibility you are confident about getting into HCC while BSN is little unsure due to the competition? The advisors at USF won't even meet with students unless you are already considered Pre-Nursing. When I got accepted in HCC in the fall, I thought about re-applying to spring for personal reasons, but decided to go b/c if I didn't get re-accepted, I was screwed. I had the opportunity and I took it. Whatever move you make, make sure you are smart about it. If you can get into the BSN, that's awesome, but don't let the idea that an ADN has any less pride than a BSN. You are going to get it anyway. All I'm saying is I think if the opportunity presents itself, take it. Students would sell a kidney for just one shot at getting accepted anywhere. Now, I could be wrong about the timelines, so make sure you look into that with proper advisement.

The one thing I will tell you is apply for HCC. Do it! You can always reject the acceptance if you need to. There is no reason to just not apply at HCC and cross your fingers for the BSN. If you get accepted to HCC, you will have an ace up your sleeve. Who knows....you might end up needing more pre-reqs for the BSN than you thought or there's some stupid deadline that you didn't catch and HCC ends up being the opportunity you needed. Plus, there are CRNA schools that don't need 3-5 yrs in the unit. Depending on where go, some school only require 1-2!

Edited by hodgieRN

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

9,480 Visitors; 276 Posts

The college I attend has an ADN program. You can graduate with a pre-bac nursing degree though. Supposedly if you just get the basic AAS degree at my college you have to retake all the prereqs at the university. Something to pay attention to. If you get the AS in pre nursing you can start your junior year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3,465 Visitors; 40 Posts

You are about right on the timeline, from what I have gathered too. I would have to enter a university once I finish my AA, and then go straight into upper level classes. Therefore, it would be two years. However, I will not have my AA by the end of spring. I could wrap it up in summer, but the university deadline is by spring. With that being said, I would have to wait a whole year to even APPLY to a university -with no guarantee that I will get in. :banghead: By then, I would already be finishing or finished my RN at the ADN level. lol ohhhh well ...I am definitely going to apply to the LPN-RN bridge at HCC and SPC. That way I have more than one option. HCC has only one application period , but SPC enrolls three times a year. I was told that SPC USE TO have a BSN on-campus program, but not sure if they still do. I am going to look into that. It would be great if they did!! If not, I will try my best with something else. I can always work on my BSN while getting my RN experience done for CRNA. That's awesome that some schools only require 1-2 years! I haven't heard of that! Thanks for alllllllllllllllllllllll the info and helping me along this crazy choice. haha :roflmao:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
advertisement

3,465 Visitors; 40 Posts

I reread the website. Looks like if I start ADN this summer I would finish May 2014. I could use that summer to take the NCLEX and get licensed. Then I would apply for FALL 2014. I could also, get NCLEX done and find a job, then go back in SPRING 2015. Full time will have me finishing in either summer or Fall 2015 with my BSN (at USF). That is not long at all! I would just be beginning a traditional BSN program for 2 years at that time if I wait for my AA and all the deadlines! Thanks for pointing that out! I will be there before I know it! :nurse:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5,413 Visitors; 219 Posts

PSC, one county over (and closer than all but USF) has an RN-BSN program. Mostly 8-week classes, and the schedule is made for working nurses. Cheaper than universities, and they have a 2-semester transition for LPNs. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hodgieRN has 10 years experience and works as a RN.

11,719 Visitors; 643 Posts

CRNA experience requirements.....

Barry University in Miami-

"A minimum of one year, full-time clinical experience as a Registered Nurse in a critical care setting within the last 3 years. Clinical experience should be direct hands-on patient care. The "critical care setting" is not limited to a specific work area. However, the complexity of the patient population's health problems should routinely require non-invasive and invasive monitoring, continuous pharmacologic infusions and mechanical ventilation. The CCRN credential serves as evidence of required knowledge and experience, and is highly regarded."

USF-

A minimum of two current years of experience as an RN in an aggressive critical care unit must be complete prior to matriculation into the program.

Woodford College in Naples

Vaguely say current ICU experience. I wonder if the amount of time doesn't really matter, but you need documentation on your proficiency with clinical patient management in the unit

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

kalevra has 5 years experience and works as a RN.

19,268 Visitors; 530 Posts

Go to university and save yourself time. Once your in RN school all they keep telling you is BSn is the new standard for hospitals in the area. By "they" i mean the guest speakers instructors bring in to class. By "guest speakers" I mean the nurse hiring manager.

Also if you want to open up your options for your career, I recommend just going straight to BSN. You will save time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3,465 Visitors; 40 Posts

Thank you everyone for all your input!!! 😃

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Racer15 has 5 years experience and works as a RN.

9,543 Visitors; 707 Posts

I did the ADN route, and will start on my BSN in the fall. I picked the route that I did because it was far cheaper to get my ADN than my BSN, and I already have a lot of student loan debt from my first bachelors degree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×