Which is the best route to take for my BSN?

  1. I'm satisfying my pre-requisites right now, so I can apply to nursning school.
    I have an unrelated Associates Degree- and I am aiming to get a Bachelors (in Nursing).
    I currently have a full time day job-- so I'm accustom to the work/school grind.

    QUESTION:
    Is it better for me to go get an Associates degree in Nursing, from a reputable community college ... so I can get my foot in the door at a local hospital--- then work as a nurse, while I go back to school to do the ADN to BSN program at Metro State?
    This program at Metro State allows you to continue working, while achieving your Bachelors degree in Nursing.
    Also-- this might be a somewhat less expensive route because it's all through community and state colleges.

    OR...

    Is it best to just knock it out all at once and go to Denver School of Nursing for their Bachelors Program and spend the $60,000? My fear with this- is that I will have graduated with a Bachelors degree- but still have no real life work experience. And it's expensive.

    Any advice on this?

    Thank you in advance!
  2. Visit dddduncan profile page

    About dddduncan

    Joined: Dec '08; Posts: 21; Likes: 1

    12 Comments

  3. by   hope3456
    Definately the CC route! It sounds like new grad RN's are having a hard time in CO right now - you don't want to be 60k+ in debt with no guarantee of a job....as opposed to 8k - 10k you would spend at a CC. A couple years ago RN's could just practically get hired on the spot for any job which does not seem to be the case anymore. And even if you do have to wait - at least you have a job in the meantime. and it has been my experience that hiring managers are much more interested in your work history rather than your education - so there is no problems with obtaining the bachelors while working as a ADN.
  4. by   LuckyKelleyK
    Denver school of nursing's BSN program isn't 60,000 dollars. Its more like 40,000. Time is also a factor, it will take much more time in school to do the ADN-BSN route. So its a toss up.
  5. by   albpreemieRN
    I don't think anyone can necessarily tell you what is the best route for YOU. The best advice I can give is research programs and see what fits in with your schedule and lifestyle. Good luck to you!
  6. by   dddduncan
    I think that people say the Denver School of Nursing route is about $60K--- because you are not encouraged to work during that time, and so I would have to take out extra money to cover my cost of living...cause I don't have a dime saved right now.

    Man- I wish I knew what would be the best route...
  7. by   kasperas
    If you think you will want to get a MSN or higher than you might as well get your BSN now. Have you thought abotu UCD? It is a state school and much cheaper than DSN or Regis. Plus it is highly respected across the country in case you move outside of Denver. It is hard to get in though - so you have to have stellar grades in your pre-requs.
  8. by   Dennis88
    Quote from kasperas
    If you think you will want to get a MSN or higher than you might as well get your BSN now. Have you thought abotu UCD? It is a state school and much cheaper than DSN or Regis. Plus it is highly respected across the country in case you move outside of Denver. It is hard to get in though - so you have to have stellar grades in your pre-requs.
    I agree with just going for the BSN now. Keep in mind that DSN does not yet have the appropriate accreditation for acceptance at Master's level programs. They might get it at some point, but it's something to consider.
  9. by   caliotter3
    Is the Denver School of Nursing a public school or a proprietary school? For that amount of money I would assume it is a proprietary school. If so, check into the transferability of their courses to other schools, in case you decide later on to get a masters degree. Don't pay good money to go to a school that limits your future. Look into public schools for a BSN and/or for an ASN. You can work as a nurse while you are getting a BSN. For that matter there are many schools where you can get a BSN online.
  10. by   dddduncan
    I have excluded UCD (University of Colorado at Denver) from my options, because they have strict limitations on how old your pre-requisites can be. That means that I would have to re-take about 8 classes that I took when I got my Associates of Arts & Sciences. (Sociology, Psychology, Statistics, Biology, etc.) ON TOP of the science classes needed to satisfy the pre-reqs. (Anatomy, Physiology, Micro-bio, etc) I would basically have to re-do my Associates degree, and there is still no guarantee that they would even let me into their nursing school.
    At DSN, you are guaranteed admission, so long as you fulfill their requirements. (and yes, DSN is a private/trade school)

    Something else to think about with the ADN to BSN program is that some hospitals pay for continued education. So if I got an ADN and (assuming I) found work right away, then hopefully they would pay for me to get my BSN...

    I guess I don't want to be one of those people who graduates with a Bachelors, and can't find a job.
    I also don't want to be the person with TWO Associate degrees- who never goes back for her Bachelors.
  11. by   tinybabynurse
    If you go the CC route, you just have to be prepared to wait around for a long time. I believe the wait is 2-3 yrs. Then you only have an Associate's degree and it will take you even more time to get the RN-BSN. You have to do what is right for you, but for me...time was money. If it takes minimum of 5-6 yrs to even be working as an RN you have to consider what your current job is and if you could be done in half the time and have the extra 3 yrs with an RN salary you might find that you come out way ahead financially doing it that way.

    One route that I would have probably explored had I known about it before I was already accepted to NS is to go to work at University Hospital and let them pay for your BSN. They have a program where once you have worked for them for a year, you can apply to do a sort of work/study program. You even get paid your hourly rate while in class. The details are on their website. That's even cheaper than CC and gets you to your goal faster.

    Good luck!
  12. by   Dennis88
    Quote from Greenzo
    If you go the CC route, you just have to be prepared to wait around for a long time. I believe the wait is 2-3 yrs.
    Some of the CCs have closed thier waitlists and switching to competitive apps once they finish taking the remaining people on the list, like Arapahoe. So you can't even apply there for another 2 years.
  13. by   jellyfish111
    I graduated with my BSN from Metro State, the accelerated program. The overall cost was much cheaper than DSN. However, to be accepted into the accelerated program you must already have a BS. The accelerated program is now 17 months long (it was 13 mo when I went through the program). During the program, it's near impossible to work because the schedule is constantly changing. There is a new module every 6 weeks and they often wait to give you the schedule until RIGHT BEFORE the new module starts so you can't schedule consistant work days. Metro also has an RN to BSN option that I don't know much about. That being said, I was quite dissapointed with the Metro program. They were going through major changes, two of their best teachers just left and I feel like important information was just straight out skipped!! I was also unimpressed with clinical placements. Really, a quality learning experience was not considered when placing students!!!! It was more like I found a place for you to get your required hours for clinicals... I don't care if you don't have a good experience It was quite frustrating!!! On a positive note, I did feel like I was prepared for the NCLEX and pass the 1st time in 75 questions. Im not sure if I can attribute that to my study skills or Metros program!
  14. by   Cricket Hippo
    Quote from dddduncan
    I have excluded UCD (University of Colorado at Denver) from my options, because they have strict limitations on how old your pre-requisites can be. That means that I would have to re-take about 8 classes that I took when I got my Associates of Arts & Sciences. (Sociology, Psychology, Statistics, Biology, etc.) ON TOP of the science classes needed to satisfy the pre-reqs. (Anatomy, Physiology, Micro-bio, etc) I would basically have to re-do my Associates degree, and there is still no guarantee that they would even let me into their nursing school.
    At DSN, you are guaranteed admission, so long as you fulfill their requirements. (and yes, DSN is a private/trade school)

    Something else to think about with the ADN to BSN program is that some hospitals pay for continued education. So if I got an ADN and (assuming I) found work right away, then hopefully they would pay for me to get my BSN...

    I guess I don't want to be one of those people who graduates with a Bachelors, and can't find a job.
    I also don't want to be the person with TWO Associate degrees- who never goes back for her Bachelors.
    Is admission really guaranteed when pre-req's are done? Is the 2.0 minimum all that is required? I am applying now, and very nervous!

    Thanks!

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