Nurses' Unions - page 6

The topic of unionization has come up,lately, at work, and it got me wondering. So I'm hoping some of you nurses who are currently represented by unions could tell me what union you're with, and how... Read More

  1. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Shamira Aizza
    And spacenurse...I can only imagine the uproar if Unions were subject to the same scrutiny that hospitals are exposed to, and if Unions were expected to operate with razor thin profit margins under the same level of scrutiny. As it stands, unions have a far greater profit margin (considering they really offer very little), compared to the hospitals they exploit.
    Razor thin hospital profit margins? Really?

    Just as an example ... RN's are unionized at 25 Catholic Healthcare West hospitals in California.

    Yet net income was up $90 million in 2006 for a total of $438 million. It sure doesn't look like razor thin profit margins to me ...

    http://www.chwhealth.org/stellent/gr...ent/135150.pdf

    I see you're from Georgia where RN's make $24 an hour, on average. In my current California union job, I'm making $45 an hour.

    As far as I'm concerned, unions can profit as much as they want because they're certainly delivering on my behalf.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Apr 27, '07
  2. by   Simplepleasures
    Who would you place your trust in to see to it that you are treated fairly, the CEO of the corporation or the Union? Simple really.
  3. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from ingelein
    Who would you place your trust in to see to it that you are treated fairly, the CEO of the corporation or the Union? Simple really.
    It would depend on the CEO. Not fair to judge all CEO's as if they were wicked money-hungry anti-nurse meanies.

    We have a new CEO - I like her. So far. She has good ideas for our small rural hospital which is hemorrhaging $$. Her last job in Montana was as a CEO and she turned that hospital around.

    When one of the docs interviewed her, he asked her how to retain nurses here. She said "pay them more".

    Granted it has only been a month or so . . . . . I'm not wearing blinders. But still, I'd like to give her the benefit of the doubt.

    As to unions, I just disagree on principle. I am a professional nurse and can stand up for myself.

    The last time a union came up here to recruit, it was SEIU . . . .they showed up looking like they belonged to the mafia and had on big diamond rings (union dues?) . . . and we are a rural farming/logging community. We all had a giggle over that. The nurses voted the union down.

    steph
  4. by   Suedern
    any person with commen since know that their are bad companies and good companies. bad ones put money before adequate care, safe care, and and keeping their employees work enviroment a safe and healthy place to work. and of course good companies actually make a profit because of less turn over, and shorter stays, and a mirad of other reasons mentioned throughout these threads and articles.

    i would still like to see how those staunch nonunion supporters have helped make their work enviroment a better place to work. your the ones that won't stand up to management and risk your job and put you foot down and say this is not safe, not right. aren't you the ones with your masters and doctorates that could lay out the research and at least try to convince them. no, because your the one who probably moved up in your positon because of merit. or your that charge or unit director who stands by and sees those "slaves" working their tails off, without breaks, bathroom time, or lunch, and will turn your head when you see their ship sinking. and will turn around and say to that nurse, "if you told me, i would have helped you", or "you should have asked for help". what? you mean those people can't tell when their nurses aren't sinking. road trips to radiology, both patients intubated, both patients on vasopressors and 15 min. vitals, both with diarrhea, both with biligernt families, poor iv access, meds not delivered timely and having to go down how many floors to the basement. anything else? of course their is.


    i'de also like to see that staunch nonunion member out their fighting for better legislation for better and safer care. if more of you stood up for what was right for every patient out there, you probably would not need unions.

    but, as you see in hospitals trying to decert unions(i say hospitals, because what nurse actually would, in good conscence start one?), the majority of nurses who don't sign the decerts probably know deep down the the union has made care better for them and their patients.
    what good chg nurse or unit director who has treated their workers in the way management tells them too,can actually sleep at night?
    in response to the big diamonds that the seiu wear. what? are you a jeweler? you probably couldn't tell the difference between a rock and a piece of glass. that's the kind of talk that sound very uneducated, or silly union busting talk.
  5. by   HM2VikingRN
    Quote from sandrarn
    any person with commen since know that their are bad companies and good companies. bad ones put money before adequate care, safe care, and and keeping their employees work enviroment a safe and healthy place to work. and of course good companies actually make a profit because of less turn over, and shorter stays, and a mirad of other reasons mentioned throughout these threads and articles.

    i would still like to see how those staunch nonunion supporters have helped make their work enviroment a better place to work. your the ones that won't stand up to management and risk your job and put you foot down and say this is not safe, not right. aren't you the ones with your masters and doctorates that could lay out the research and at least try to convince them. no, because your the one who probably moved up in your positon because of merit. or your that charge or unit director who stands by and sees those "slaves" working their tails off, without breaks, bathroom time, or lunch, and will turn your head when you see their ship sinking. and will turn around and say to that nurse, "if you told me, i would have helped you", or "you should have asked for help". what? you mean those people can't tell when their nurses aren't sinking. road trips to radiology, both patients intubated, both patients on vasopressors and 15 min. vitals, both with diarrhea, both with biligernt families, poor iv access, meds not delivered timely and having to go down how many floors to the basement. anything else? of course their is.


    i'de also like to see that staunch nonunion member out their fighting for better legislation for better and safer care. if more of you stood up for what was right for every patient out there, you probably would not need unions.

    but, as you see in hospitals trying to decert unions(i say hospitals, because what nurse actually would, in good conscence start one?), the majority of nurses who don't sign the decerts probably know deep down the the union has made care better for them and their patients.
    what good chg nurse or unit director who has treated their workers in the way management tells them too,can actually sleep at night?
    in response to the big diamonds that the seiu wear. what? are you a jeweler? you probably couldn't tell the difference between a rock and a piece of glass. that's the kind of talk that sound very uneducated, or silly union busting talk.
    :yeahthat:

    all it takes for evil to triumph is for good people to do nothing. decertify=stupid as far as i am concerned.
    Last edit by HM2VikingRN on Jun 26, '07
  6. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from sandrarn
    any person with commen since know that their are bad companies and good companies. bad ones put money before adequate care, safe care, and and keeping their employees work enviroment a safe and healthy place to work. and of course good companies actually make a profit because of less turn over, and shorter stays, and a mirad of other reasons mentioned throughout these threads and articles.

    i would still like to see how those staunch nonunion supporters have helped make their work enviroment a better place to work. your the ones that won't stand up to management and risk your job and put you foot down and say this is not safe, not right. aren't you the ones with your masters and doctorates that could lay out the research and at least try to convince them. no, because your the one who probably moved up in your positon because of merit. or your that charge or unit director who stands by and sees those "slaves" working their tails off, without breaks, bathroom time, or lunch, and will turn your head when you see their ship sinking. and will turn around and say to that nurse, "if you told me, i would have helped you", or "you should have asked for help". what? you mean those people can't tell when their nurses aren't sinking. road trips to radiology, both patients intubated, both patients on vasopressors and 15 min. vitals, both with diarrhea, both with biligernt families, poor iv access, meds not delivered timely and having to go down how many floors to the basement. anything else? of course their is.


    i'de also like to see that staunch nonunion member out their fighting for better legislation for better and safer care. if more of you stood up for what was right for every patient out there, you probably would not need unions.

    but, as you see in hospitals trying to decert unions(i say hospitals, because what nurse actually would, in good conscence start one?), the majority of nurses who don't sign the decerts probably know deep down the the union has made care better for them and their patients.
    what good chg nurse or unit director who has treated their workers in the way management tells them too,can actually sleep at night?
    in response to the big diamonds that the seiu wear. what? are you a jeweler? you probably couldn't tell the difference between a rock and a piece of glass. that's the kind of talk that sound very uneducated, or silly union busting talk.
    wow. what a judgmental bunch of crock.

    i do make my work environment a better and safer place. i'm not afraid of management - that is just silly. i can get a job anywhere - i'm not the type to bend over and grab my ankles for anyone.

    as to the comment about the union reps . . . it doesn't matter whether the diamond rings were real or not. you missed my point completely. these union reps came to a rural community made up of hardworking people and they dressed like someone from a big city - they had on suits that looked like the mafia and wore rings with big "rocks". it certainly made us think about where exactly they got the money for those big rings. it certainly didn't make a good impression - they were trying to woo us and it backfired.

    calling people stupid for having a different opinion is not conducive to a good conversation.

    i'm not a union buster - if the majority of nurses voted one in - so be it. i believe in letting the majority have what they want. i'd just go elsewhere. simple.

    steph
  7. by   HM2VikingRN
    Quote from stevielynn
    I'm not a union buster - if the majority of nurses voted one in - so be it. I believe in letting the majority have what they want. I'd just go elsewhere. Simple.

    steph
    Why throw away working relationships if your fellow employees decide to bargain collectively ON YOUR BEHALF?
  8. by   Ms.Hobbes
    "i'de also like to see that staunch nonunion member out their fighting for better legislation for better and safer care. if more of you stood up for what was right for every patient out there, you probably would not need unions." stated by sandra rn
    i would also like to state that unions are not the only way to have a voice and to be out there petitioning legislation for change. joining a professional organization such as ena, ana and lots others is a great way to petition for change and be a part of policies that protect nurses and patients and also install high quality standards and care.
    anyway just my two cents...
  9. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from ms.hobbes
    "i'de also like to see that staunch nonunion member out their fighting for better legislation for better and safer care. if more of you stood up for what was right for every patient out there, you probably would not need unions." stated by sandra rn
    i would also like to state that unions are not the only way to have a voice and to be out there petitioning legislation for change. joining a professional organization such as ena, ana and lots others is a great way to petition for change and be a part of policies that protect nurses and patients and also install high quality standards and care.
    anyway just my two cents...
    right!
    here in california the ena led the lobbying for the motorcycle law. cna followed.
    the ena also testified at hearings on the ratio regulations. cna got the law and the ena got the minimum ratios they recommended. here they are:
    in a hospital providing basic emergency medical services or comprehensive emergency medical services, the licensed nurse-to-patient ratio in an emergency department shall be 1:4 or fewer at all times that patients are receiving treatment. there shall be no fewer than two licensed nurses physically present in the emergency department when a patient is present.

    at least one of the licensed nurses shall be a registered nurse assigned to triage patients. the registered nurse assigned to triage patients shall be immediately available at all times to triage patients when they arrive in the emergency department. when there are no patients needing triage, the registered nurse may assist by performing other nursing tasks. the registered nurse assigned to triage patients shall not be counted in the licensed nurse-to-patient ratio.

    hospitals designated by the local emergency medical services (lems) agency as a “base hospital”, as defined in section 1797.58 of the health and safety code, shall have either a licensed physician or a registered nurse on duty to respond to the base radio 24 hours each day. when the duty of base radio responder is assigned to a registered nurse, that registered nurse may assist by performing other nursing tasks when not responding to radio calls, but shall be immediately available to respond to requests for medical direction on the base radio. the registered nurse assigned as base radio responder shall not be counted in the licensed nurse-to-patient ratios.

    when licensed nursing staff are attending critical care patients in the emergency department, the licensed nurse-to-patient ratio shall be 1:2 or fewer critical care patients at all times. a patient in the emergency department shall be considered a critical care patient when the patient meets the criteria for admission to a critical care service area within the hospital.

    only registered nurses shall be assigned to critical trauma patients in the emergency department, and a minimum registered nurse-to-critical trauma patient ratio of 1:1 shall be maintained at all times. a critical trauma patient is a patient who has injuries to an anatomic area that : (1) require life saving interventions, or (2) in conjunction with unstable vital signs, pose an immediate threat to life or limb.
    http://www.dhs.ca.gov/lnc/ntp/default.htm
  10. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from HM2Viking
    Why throw away working relationships if your fellow employees decide to bargain collectively ON YOUR BEHALF?
    Hey, if there was an opt-out clause and I didn't have to pay union dues, I'd stay.

    But I will not work anywhere where I'm forced to join a union.

    Just a personal thing.

    steph
  11. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from ms.hobbes
    "i'de also like to see that staunch nonunion member out their fighting for better legislation for better and safer care. if more of you stood up for what was right for every patient out there, you probably would not need unions." stated by sandra rn
    i would also like to state that unions are not the only way to have a voice and to be out there petitioning legislation for change. joining a professional organization such as ena, ana and lots others is a great way to petition for change and be a part of policies that protect nurses and patients and also install high quality standards and care.
    anyway just my two cents...
    this is a good point.


    steph
  12. by   Sisyphus
    Quote from Shamira Aizza

    You think that some people should pay for everyone else's acute and routine care. I think that if I'm footing part of the bill, I should be allowed to tell them how to behave so that they don't engage in behaviors that result in their inability to pay even a $10 copay for medical care...that would be for the common good of everyone...both them and me.
    Wow! This one paragraph reveals so much about you. Do you realize how your statements are only a breath away from being fascist in definition? You don't approve of someone's behavior - in order for them to receive care that is subsidized by public money, they should abide by your standards?

    I dislike many people and disapprove strongly of some of their behaviors but I know that they are a part of society and as such, they are members of the USA community. They are supported with public monies as are the rest of the members of our community/country. Our social contract isn't limited to those of whom we approve.
  13. by   HM2VikingRN
    Quote from stevielynn
    Hey, if there was an opt-out clause and I didn't have to pay union dues, I'd stay.

    But I will not work anywhere where I'm forced to join a union.

    Just a personal thing.

    steph
    It is your choice to not associate with others for the purpose of collective bargaining. My point is that you and every other union opponent have received direct benefits from the efforts of members who have chosen to collectively bargain.

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