Jump to content

CNAs and weight

CNA/MA   (10,831 Views 34 Comments)
by fuzzywuzzy fuzzywuzzy, CNA (Member)

fuzzywuzzy has 3 years experience as a CNA and specializes in LTC.

16,933 Visitors; 1,816 Posts

advertisement

You are reading page 2 of CNAs and weight. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

4,854 Visitors; 107 Posts

I think they might mean CNA as in computers not health care

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1,487 Visitors; 24 Posts

I'm a newbie here, but I thought I would comment. I am currently a receptionist in a dental office, and THAT is the fattest job. I am taking my CNA class this summer as a pre-req for nursing school. And I used to work in a boarding home for senior citizens when my grandmother owned it, and did several of the task a CNA would do. And its not easy work, and most of the residents were able to walk and take care of themselves, but the few who really needed help was enough to wear you out sometimes.

But once I started working in the dental office at the desk, I gained weight almost immediately due to the lack of activity. So they should have feature the receptionist in that article!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5,277 Visitors; 528 Posts

*blink*.... *blink*... BWAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!

An article like that coming from someone who makes their living sitting on their laurels pushing a pen all day... *rolls eyes*

Stick this one in the round file, ladies- it's about as useful as that Viagra spam in the e-box.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

fuzzywuzzy has 3 years experience as a CNA and specializes in LTC.

16,933 Visitors; 1,816 Posts

I think they might mean CNA as in computers not health care

Nope, they even posed this person in scrubs and a stethoscope.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sarcolemma specializes in LTC, ICU, ER, Anesthesia.

2,699 Visitors; 69 Posts

I'd have to agree in that it seems that there's an unusually high amount of obese people working as nursing assistants.

I was a CNA.......I'd say at least 60% (maybe more) of the people I worked with were obese, with probably 30%+ being morbidly obese.

Mild exercise does not excuse an otherwise sedentary lifestyle with poor eating habits, smoking, etc.

I can only speak on nursing home aids though, as thats where i did all my time.

Based on level of education required, pay grade, and my own biased observations from working as one full time for 6 years, it seems CNA's (generally speaking) represent the lower income/educational/poverty level demographic, complete with all the inherent risks - including an increased incidence of obesity - which has been well established in many public health studies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

macrich84 specializes in Rehabilitation.

1,427 Visitors; 39 Posts

I'm not trying to start anything because it is obvious you've been in our shoes before. But, there are still some of us that are trying to gain experience while in school or it is required by our schools to get into a nursing program. Or don't live within the poverty level when combining incomes with a spouse. It's hard to generalize any profession. However, there is one thing that most of us all have in common with each other (nurses not just us cnas), we are caregivers with very little time to spend on ourselves. We are wifes, husbands, parents, students, etc on top of working on your feet all day or night. I'll be the first to admit that it's a strungle finding time. And like most of us said before, we were chunky before we started.

And I'm with EricaB on this one... When I worked at a desk job for 5 years, I could just look at a cookie and gain weight. At least now I know that I can work that cookie off after a couple transfers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5,277 Visitors; 528 Posts

I think that may be a regional thing, as far as the "level of education required/lower income" statement. Around here (near a city whose financial base is the healthcare industry) a significant number of CNAs seem to be either on their way to nursing school (often taking prereqs etc. along with working- or are IN nursing school) or have already attained a Bachelors or other degree. Not all, maybe not most- but enough to buck the generalization. I also find it the exception around here rather than the rule that CNAs are generally obese.

I'd have to agree in that it seems that there's an unusually high amount of obese people working as nursing assistants.

I was a CNA.......I'd say at least 60% (maybe more) of the people I worked with were obese, with probably 30%+ being morbidly obese.

Mild exercise does not excuse an otherwise sedentary lifestyle with poor eating habits, smoking, etc.

I can only speak on nursing home aids though, as thats where i did all my time.

Based on level of education required, pay grade, and my own biased observations from working as one full time for 6 years, it seems CNA's (generally speaking) represent the lower income/educational/poverty level demographic, complete with all the inherent risks - including an increased incidence of obesity - which has been well established in many public health studies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1,814 Visitors; 24 Posts

my doctor told me that having a physical job is NOT the same as intentionally working out 3-4 times a week for 30 minutes to intentionally work up a sweat. i can barely find the energy to do it now, i cant imagine having to do it after working all day. hopefully i will get an evening shift and work out when i wake up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hotmama2be specializes in HomeHealth / geriatrics.

2,834 Visitors; 108 Posts

This whole topic is ludacris , People magazine is a tabloid magazine . So who gives a rats behind what they think about NA's its HARD work they have no idea what they are talking about.

And also lower income does not equal obesity I have seen HUGE nurses that have a bachelors degrees and they are WAY to heavy . I personally work in home care and I AM not obese by any means so please stop stereo typing anyways statistics are so vague and irrelevant. So don't judge until you have walk in the shoes of nursing assistant!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

838 Visitors; 11 Posts

Honestly all the CNAs that I know are trim. I actually was the largest CNA at the LTC I worked at. The RN's were heavier actually.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

systoly has 23 years experience and specializes in LTC, Memory loss, PDN.

12,082 Visitors; 1,756 Posts

I've worked with hundreds of CNAs in different states and, after thinking on it for a few minutes, can only remember about seven extremely heavy CNAs. So I cannot agree with people magazine. Of course the use of the word "fat" makes me believe this article was based on sensationalism rather than journalism. A person maybe labeled fat, because they don't fit the Barbie or Ken mold, but in reality may be well within their weight range.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

fuzzywuzzy has 3 years experience as a CNA and specializes in LTC.

16,933 Visitors; 1,816 Posts

This whole topic is ludacris , People magazine is a tabloid magazine . So who gives a rats behind what they think about NA's its HARD work they have no idea what they are talking about.

And also lower income does not equal obesity I have seen HUGE nurses that have a bachelors degrees and they are WAY to heavy . I personally work in home care and I AM not obese by any means so please stop stereo typing anyways statistics are so vague and irrelevant. So don't judge until you have walk in the shoes of nursing assistant!!!!!

Whoa... I wasn't judging anyone. I created this thread because I saw something about CNAs in the media, which rarely ever happens, and what i saw happened to surprise me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing 0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×