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CNA as School Nurse?

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There is a job posting for a School Nurse position currently in Georgia that states the minimum requirements are:

"Current State Certification as LPN or CNA."

Then it states the job responsibilities as:

"Under the supervision of the school principal and Deputy Superintendent, the school nurse will carry out the following duties:

1. Oversee and / or administer medications given at assigned school according to prescription and / or over-the-counter label instructions, keeping accurate documentation.

2. Provide guidelines for documentation of sick/injured children and medication administration.

3. Adhere to the directions of the physician when providing related services at all schools.

4. Be available for emergency care of all faculty, staff, and students at all schools.

5. Consult with teachers, administrators, parents and outside agencies relative to student health problems at all schools.

6. Assist faculty in identifying and referring students in need of medical and dental care.

7. Teach First Aid and C.P.R. to personnel as indicated and requested.

8. Make initial and follow-up screenings of possible contagious diseases when referred by a staff member.

9. Purchase and distribute medical and first aid supplies to each school.

10. Participate with administrators and school staff in developing and implementing the overall school health policies (e.g., head lice, medication administration).

11. Coordinate community resources to aid students, parents and teachers regarding health-related problems and/or needs.

12. Work with teachers in carrying out the Health and Safety Curriculum and Sexuality Objectives, K-12.

13. Maintain up-to-date cumulative health records on students referred for medical/nursing care.

14. Maintain Federal and State records as required.

15. Work with the County Health Department in conducting routine scoliosis screenings.

16. Serve on committees (Family Life Council and Guidance Committee).

17. Assume other duties as assigned."

I was under the impression from the state scope of practice and the board policy statements that a CNA would not be able to legally carry out all of the duties and requirements listed in the job (posted by a public school). For example, the medication administration section of the code states,

"The administration of medication is the process whereby a prescribed medication or a medication ordered under a nurse protocol, O.C.G.A. 43-34-26-1, is given to a patient/client by one of several routes to include but not be limited to, oral, inhalation, topical, rectal, or parenteral. The registered nurse verifies the medication order and the properly prescribed medication, gives the medication in accordance with current standards of practice and accepted principles and procedures as taught in nursing education. These include verification that the right medication is being given to the right patient/client in the right dose, by the right route at the right time as well as the assessment of the patient/client following administration of the medication for expected effects and possible untoward side effects. Administration of medication is a complex nursing responsibility which requires a knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacology. Registered nurses may administer medications prescribed by authorized health care providers which may include protocols as defined in O.C.G.A. 43-34-26.1. "

Experienced school nurses, what are your thoughts on this? Thanks for any and all input.

NutmeggeRN, BSN

Specializes in kids. Has 25 years experience.

NOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I bet the wording of the job title of the available job is wrong. No WAY is that what a CNA/LPN can do. Look at the last line under what the RN role is in med administration.

HisTreasure, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics. Has 10 years experience.

I am not sure about what state that is, but LPNs can be, and are school nurses in some places. LPNs are licensed to give medications, do wound care, and document. In schools without a nurse (only employ district nurses that rotate schools and audit charts) CNAs may undergo a medication administration course and give medications as per district rules. It is quite common in some areas.

uRNmyway, ASN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg.

Wow, an LPN can fulfill this role, I'm this. But a CNA? They aren't trained to have the nursing judgment for medication administration, and I know this because the HH agency I work for trains CNAs. I also don't think they should be able to provide teaching as they don't have the A&P background to provide rationale with teaching.

This just seems SO wrong to me...

NutmeggeRN, BSN

Specializes in kids. Has 25 years experience.

NOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I bet the wording of the job title of the available job is wrong. No WAY is that what a CNA/LPN can do. Look at the last line under what the RN role is in med administration.

I meant CNA. LPNs do many, if not all tasks listed in job description. In my state an LPN can only work in a school under the direct supervision of an RN.

@kiyasmom What you describe and what is asked for in the job description, are I think very separate when you start to look at all the other job functions.

No, while theycould give meds per their district policy, a CNA cannot fulfill the job description because they would then be practicing as a nurse.

HisTreasure, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics. Has 10 years experience.

You are absolutely right about the CNA. I was just mentioning LPNs work as school nurses under the supervision of the district RN. I'm familiar with the CNAs as med aids in the school because we had to bus one of my foster children out of district because the school she was assigned to had no building RN and the agency and I didn't feel comfortable with there not being an in-building backup to her private duty LPN. I may have misunderstood the OP. my apologies. :)

NutmeggeRN, BSN

Specializes in kids. Has 25 years experience.

No worries :)

HazelLPN, LPN

Specializes in Adult ICU/PICU/NICU. Has 54 years experience.

I do not believe that legally anyone can use the title of "nurse" unless they are an RN or an LPN.