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Chamberlain FNP Reviews and experiences

Posted

Specializes in RN/BSN. Has 11 years experience.

Hello, I’m currently an FNP at Chamberlain college of nursing, work full time and have a family. I have noticed over the past couple years the curriculum has been all over the place and so many changes (technologically) it’s hard to keep up with changes so frequently. I have learned from previous students that attended and graduated from there have said the program has changed so much since they graduated just two years ago and not for the good. I also know a few people that say it’s almost impossible to work full time and goto school there full time at the same time. I’ve even been encouraged to get out now while I still can and find a better school! Ugh... it has me sooo afraid as I only have 10 classes left. I haven’t started clinical yet. My GPA is 3.8 currently. Does anyone know of any better schools that are online based that are actually worth trying? Any advice, past experiences, feedback etc would be so appreciated. #afraidoffailing

ajboujieRN, MSN, APRN

Specializes in Primary care. Has 13 years experience.

Some schools are 16 week vs 8 wk semester, this gives you more time to do the assignments. But the 16 week semester (part-time) are 2-3 classes vs 1 class in the 8 wk semester. I did Chamberlain for 1 semester, then switched to U of Cincinnati (part-time). Remember, schools only take so many transfer hours & they may/may not take all of them. Take that in consideration. Plus some schools will require essay, 3 letters of recommendation, and depending if FNP, AGPC etc. the cohort may start in different times of the year & have deadlines months in advance for all that admin ppwrk & then the what-if selection process. Check with enrollment asap. Coursework is probably same for difficulty, but getting into a different program will take patience & effort. I believe with any clinical rotation, at least by the 2nd practicum/semester ( 3 practicums total) it is very hard to work full time, especially if you do a lot for your family. I already know, come 3rd practicum, I may just quit or ask my manager for an extended hiatus, or if your're shift worker, switch to weekends. Good luck, if you have questions about U of Cincy, shoot me a note!

On 12/4/2019 at 10:51 PM, ajboujieRN said:

Some schools are 16 week vs 8 wk semester, this gives you more time to do the assignments. But the 16 week semester (part-time) are 2-3 classes vs 1 class in the 8 wk semester. I did Chamberlain for 1 semester, then switched to U of Cincinnati (part-time). Remember, schools only take so many transfer hours & they may/may not take all of them. Take that in consideration. Plus some schools will require essay, 3 letters of recommendation, and depending if FNP, AGPC etc. the cohort may start in different times of the year & have deadlines months in advance for all that admin ppwrk & then the what-if selection process. Check with enrollment asap. Coursework is probably same for difficulty, but getting into a different program will take patience & effort. I believe with any clinical rotation, at least by the 2nd practicum/semester ( 3 practicums total) it is very hard to work full time, especially if you do a lot for your family. I already know, come 3rd practicum, I may just quit or ask my manager for an extended hiatus, or if your're shift worker, switch to weekends. Good luck, if you have questions about U of Cincy, shoot me a note!

Hi AjboujieRN,

I'm currently debating whether to do chamberlain or cincinnati. I have been accepted to UC for this fall. Are you happy with your change and are you doing FNP? I did my BSN at chamberlain and had no problem with my courses it worked well with my job and family. However, I know MSN FNP tracks will be more difficult so I want to make sure I'm making the right decision if I go to UC vs Chamberlain.

Can you tell me if you like it and how the classes are formatted? a lot of papers to write, many quizzes/exams? was the switch from 8 wk courses to 16 wks worth it? Have your instructors been helpful? and also are there any mandatory sign in times or video conferencing/discussions? Any advice, suggestions, tips are greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance!!

ajboujieRN, MSN, APRN

Specializes in Primary care. Has 13 years experience.

Hi sarasmile1,

So in addition to what I stated previously:

Are you happy with your change and are you doing FNP?

I was FNP track & switched to AGPC Dec 2019, starting clinicals next semester in internal med; not keen on doing peds/women nor doing the extra hours. If I'm hurting for job opportunities or need the skills, I'll do a post-MSN cert for it. Personally I just want to finish & get working.

I did my BSN at chamberlain and had no problem with my courses it worked well with my job and family.

So again, if still same structure, Chamberlain is 8 week vs ~16 week sessions, if you are working full-time it will take sacrifices for the whole family. Either way, both programs will be busy. At UC, you can go part-time (2 classes per semster, or full-time 3+ which is demanding). I'm part-time, still busy but time-mgnt keeps things moving.

Can you tell me if you like it and how the classes are formatted? a lot of papers to write, many quizzes/exams?

UC is a top rated school & the program is formatted to mimic/prep for the boards, they use Canvas platform, easy to use, most test/assignments are autopopulated to your calendar so you can see way in advance when things are due. The are divided into modules per class, and tested by modules (ex: Pharm test 3, mod 9,10, 11)Profs are good about helping you extend deadlines as long as you notify them in advance. Most tests (not all) are proctored via webcam online (3rd party)& mimic typical RN school questions (mirror board) & usually about 4 test per class, with quizzes/assignments sprinkled in-between. Depending on the class some papers (theory, research etc.) other ones are discussion board assignments, & all APA sourced. With any online program, you are teaching yourself; lectures/recordings are posted with PDF slides & supplemental geez-whiz info. I use picmonics & osmosis for patho concepts, drugs/review. Classes are demanding, but the profs have designed test/assignments in a way that % wise, if you work hard, & even if you fail a test, it won't kill you (d/t all the work/assignments in totality).

was the switch from 8 wk courses to 16 wks worth it?

The 16 wk allows for spreading out watching lectures, then studying, & your work schedule. I'd assume that the 8 wk would be jammed w/things due ever week, unlike my experience at UC. Unless you are taking 3 courses, then assignments, studying etc. would pile up if you got behind.

Have your instructors been helpful?

Yes. overall most will elaborate on experiences during lectures & they respond timely & you can ask questions to peer via discussion boards & via FB groups per class, Adv Patho, Adv Health assess, etc (you just request to join each time to move to the next class). This is where you can get good info, help, & vent/meet fellow students across the country.

and also are there any mandatory sign in times or video conferencing/discussions?

No mandatory, just follow your class schedule/calendar for due dates.

Any advice, suggestions, tips are greatly appreciated.

The cost is just slightly higher at UC, which isn't a huge issue, I think it's just ~$100 or so more per/semester hr, you use microsoft 365, the Canvas platform is easy to use, one password links you to your lecture platform, school email, and catalyst which is the registrar for registration & payments, no on-campus visit for adv health assessment (chamberlain you have to fly there last time I checked). Again, you need to know your strengths/weakness in order to comprehend the information, just like in undergrad in order to be successful. Very few schools help you find clinical placement, they do have clinical coordinators but you are 98% on your own looking for preceptors. The goal is to pass the board; look at the school from this perspective. Remember after about 6 or so semester hours, schools will not transfer MSN credits. At UC, the FNP schema is 2 more classes (semester at least) & a decent amount (200 more?)of extra clincial hours vs AGPC (age 13 +). AGPC is all adult, no peds <12, no OB/Gyn clinical rotations. UC has post MSN certs & DNP programs that they cookie-cut according to your graduate specialty track.

Let me know if ya need more info!

On 4/16/2020 at 11:08 AM, ajboujieRN said:

Hi sarasmile1,

So in addition to what I stated previously:

Are you happy with your change and are you doing FNP?

I was FNP track & switched to AGPC Dec 2019, starting clinicals next semester in internal med; not keen on doing peds/women nor doing the extra hours. If I'm hurting for job opportunities or need the skills, I'll do a post-MSN cert for it. Personally I just want to finish & get working.

I did my BSN at chamberlain and had no problem with my courses it worked well with my job and family.

So again, if still same structure, Chamberlain is 8 week vs ~16 week sessions, if you are working full-time it will take sacrifices for the whole family. Either way, both programs will be busy. At UC, you can go part-time (2 classes per semster, or full-time 3+ which is demanding). I'm part-time, still busy but time-mgnt keeps things moving.

Can you tell me if you like it and how the classes are formatted? a lot of papers to write, many quizzes/exams?

UC is a top rated school & the program is formatted to mimic/prep for the boards, they use Canvas platform, easy to use, most test/assignments are autopopulated to your calendar so you can see way in advance when things are due. The are divided into modules per class, and tested by modules (ex: Pharm test 3, mod 9,10, 11)Profs are good about helping you extend deadlines as long as you notify them in advance. Most tests (not all) are proctored via webcam online (3rd party)& mimic typical RN school questions (mirror board) & usually about 4 test per class, with quizzes/assignments sprinkled in-between. Depending on the class some papers (theory, research etc.) other ones are discussion board assignments, & all APA sourced. With any online program, you are teaching yourself; lectures/recordings are posted with PDF slides & supplemental geez-whiz info. I use picmonics & osmosis for patho concepts, drugs/review. Classes are demanding, but the profs have designed test/assignments in a way that % wise, if you work hard, & even if you fail a test, it won't kill you (d/t all the work/assignments in totality).

was the switch from 8 wk courses to 16 wks worth it?

The 16 wk allows for spreading out watching lectures, then studying, & your work schedule. I'd assume that the 8 wk would be jammed w/things due ever week, unlike my experience at UC. Unless you are taking 3 courses, then assignments, studying etc. would pile up if you got behind.

Have your instructors been helpful?

Yes. overall most will elaborate on experiences during lectures & they respond timely & you can ask questions to peer via discussion boards & via FB groups per class, Adv Patho, Adv Health assess, etc (you just request to join each time to move to the next class). This is where you can get good info, help, & vent/meet fellow students across the country.

and also are there any mandatory sign in times or video conferencing/discussions?

No mandatory, just follow your class schedule/calendar for due dates.

Any advice, suggestions, tips are greatly appreciated.

The cost is just slightly higher at UC, which isn't a huge issue, I think it's just ~$100 or so more per/semester hr, you use microsoft 365, the Canvas platform is easy to use, one password links you to your lecture platform, school email, and catalyst which is the registrar for registration & payments, no on-campus visit for adv health assessment (chamberlain you have to fly there last time I checked). Again, you need to know your strengths/weakness in order to comprehend the information, just like in undergrad in order to be successful. Very few schools help you find clinical placement, they do have clinical coordinators but you are 98% on your own looking for preceptors. The goal is to pass the board; look at the school from this perspective. Remember after about 6 or so semester hours, schools will not transfer MSN credits. At UC, the FNP schema is 2 more classes (semester at least) & a decent amount (200 more?)of extra clincial hours vs AGPC (age 13 +). AGPC is all adult, no peds <12, no OB/Gyn clinical rotations. UC has post MSN certs & DNP programs that they cookie-cut according to your graduate specialty track.

Let me know if ya need more info!

Aaaw OK perfect! Thank you for answering my questions it definitely gave me a better perspective And has been a huge help! and I too now believe the 16 weeks won’t be bad considering the amount of work that we have to cover. Being ready for the boards is definitely a plus! Do they provide study guides for the exams and quizzes?

I have decided to go to UC after all, will start in August! I will try to look for other students to join the FB groups as you have suggested thank you!

I am also not huge on Peds but I think for me FNP is the better way to go career and job wise as we move around a lot. you truly have been a lot of help. Congratulations on making it this far! I hope all of your clinicals workout for you 😃 Please keep us posted on your journey!

Edited by sarasmile1