SRNA's!!! How hard is it being a student!?!!

  1. I cannot believe how incredibly difficult it is to be an SRNA (besides the obvious), but I am gettin yelled at for the most ridiculous things, like foley up or down, tourniquet above or below the elbow for the IV, to double chart or not to double chart, face mask vs. induction mask......the list goes on and on. I/we have to keep profiles of CRNA's, as to what type of tape they like, their narcotic preference,one loves it and the other is shocked that I would even think of using it......aaaaaah, im so frustrated! I am sooo willing to learn, but getting "scolded" for choosing the wrong type of "tape" is driving me nuts. Any other SRNA's experience this, I know.....go with the flow, but similar stories may ease my mind....a little. Story sharing anyone?
    •  
  2. Visit miloisstinky profile page

    About miloisstinky

    Joined: Aug '04; Posts: 104; Likes: 3

    21 Comments

  3. by   MollyS
    I will be an SRNA in August but I just have to tell you that I am expecting all of that because I trained to be an OR nurse for 5 months and it was enough to drive me completely mad. Except not only was it CRNA's, it was surgeons, scrub tech's, other circs. You name it every single person had their way and I just came to realize that there is no way around it listen, do, develop your own technique,and ultimately try not to tear your hair out. I know that doesn't answer your question but it just reminded me of the environment I am returning too. The OR in particular is the most unique environment and with it comes "unique personalties" and ways for doing everything.
  4. by   athomas91
    play the game. (with a smile)
  5. by   TraumaNurse
    Another one of our favorite sayings:

    "Thank you ma'am/sir...may I have another!"
  6. by   athomas91
    you will become just as anal retentive...it is a loved attribute - that believe it or not is neccesary...it starts to set in after the first yr...
  7. by   jewelcutt
    I find it the most in the OR/preop/pacu how unprofessional everyone is. Back in the ICU we nurses were regarded as the "*****es" of the hospital even though we treated and expected to be treated with respect just because we always looked out for our patients first. I used to find it funny how as ICU nurses with VERY sick patients we had a reason to be anal, preop nurses however don't really have a reason to be anal and mean to us students ("Do you really need to do that preop assessment now? Can't you see I'm really busy trying to start an IV and check for any metal on the body?" I actually had a NEW orientee pre op nurse say this to me). Even when you're really nice to them, pacu nurses pretend you're invisible so they can hurry up and get the bp cuff on (really important you know). As far as CRNAs/MDAs/surgeons go I also just smile, swallow, and say can I have some more please. I just find it very irking when surgical techs, other nurses treat you like crap for no reason.
  8. by   Kiwi
    Quote from TraumaNurse
    Another one of our favorite sayings:

    "Thank you ma'am/sir...may I have another!"
    You're a riot! Gotta love F.M.J.!!!
    Last edit by Kiwi on Mar 3, '05
  9. by   apaisRN
    I agree, I would find this very offensive. I guess I'll be learning to put up with it. There is no reason to treat people without basic respect even if you're not their best buddies. If I acted like some of our SICU nurses or the PACU nurses I hear described here, I would feel sooo guilty and would wonder all day if the other person's feelings were hurt! And I'm not sure why riding SRNAs on ridiculous things like tourniquet placement help create a good learning environment, but I'm soon to be an SRNA and be indoctrinated into these secrets.
  10. by   London88
    I think it was nilepoc who posted way back that you must learn the rule of the three S's show up , suck up, shut up. Just remember that the clinical area can make or break you.
  11. by   athomas91
    actually - some places really aren't that bad - i haven't had many issues at all - it has been a wonderful learning experience so far... but i have found that once you get through the initial ribbing - it gets much better - take your lashes with a smile and they will respect you eventually.
  12. by   MaleAPRN
    I have to agree with some of our fellow SRNAs that posted here, that it is only during the initial couple of months that we might be treated inhumanely (for lack of a better word). Ok, "unprofessionally"...but, the former term sounds closer to reality...right? Hehehehe.

    But, as time goes by throughout the year...as we all gain experience in the OR, the same people that gave us a hard time at the very beginning seem to "ease up" on us. Well, this is how I experience it personally in my program.

    In the perfect and ideal CRNA school setting...every student is guided, patted on the back for a good job, critiqued for improvement, etc. But, it ain't so. We all have to contend and deal with the personalities of those with whom we are assigned to...day by day.

    I too, was told in the beginning to "make flashcards" on each CRNA/MDAs preferences (with how the syringes are labeled, what needles to use, etc). I flatly REFUSED to do that and to not fall into that "anxiety-provoking" abyss. There are other things that I can focuse on besides something so trivial.

    Being humble is my gameplan. You'll get singled out if you're cocky. A know-it-all SRNA is a death sentence. It'll just be a rough road ahead for that person.

    Having a clashing personality with your CRNA/MDA or anyone in the OR for that matter is also a big factor. Again, remaining humble usually makes things go much smoother.

    At the end of the day, when I'm back home...no matter what day I had, if it was good or bad...I am always reminding myself how lucky I am to be able to fulfill my dream of becoming a CRNA. This I guess, is what gets me by...day by day.
  13. by   miloisstinky
    Thanks Vinny,

    I think you summed it up. It's so overwhelming, and the bad days are matched with the good days, not always even, but those good days are REALLY GOOD days . I always smile and shutup (good thing I have that mask on at times!:chuckle ), believe me. The interesting thing is that another SRNA, who has 20 plus years ER experience (as a nurse manager!) is having a harder time than myself, due to their difficulty taking direction and accepting criticism.

    It is SOO true, as someone said, if you have a hard time being humble, you are going to have a roughER time in clinicals. "Put up and shut up with a smile"....i'm tattooing that on my butt.
  14. by   heartICU
    Quote from miloisstinky
    I cannot believe how incredibly difficult it is to be an SRNA (besides the obvious), but I am gettin yelled at for the most ridiculous things, like foley up or down, tourniquet above or below the elbow for the IV, to double chart or not to double chart, face mask vs. induction mask......the list goes on and on. I/we have to keep profiles of CRNA's, as to what type of tape they like, their narcotic preference,one loves it and the other is shocked that I would even think of using it......aaaaaah, im so frustrated! I am sooo willing to learn, but getting "scolded" for choosing the wrong type of "tape" is driving me nuts. Any other SRNA's experience this, I know.....go with the flow, but similar stories may ease my mind....a little. Story sharing anyone?
    I totally agree. You know what conclusion I have come to? I think that most CRNAs (at least the ones I have been with) have a very systematic way of looking at things - they have a system of how they set things up, check the patients, maintain them, etc. When a student comes along, and sets up the machine they way they were taught, or tapes a way they are used to that might be different from the CRNA, their system is 'broken' and it becomes difficult for them to get past that particular piece of the puzzle and move on. They have to do it "their way" so they know it is done 'correctly' and then they can focus their concentration on something else. I have had CRNAs tell me how they like their laryngoscope to lay on the table (handle left or handle right), whether they will allow me to use the BIS or not, whether I should use tape or opsites and tape to secure IVs, etc. Truly it is a matter of learning different techniques, and taking a 'piece; of each CRNAs practice with you.

    I think a lot of CRNAs want to teach you their method, but sometimes forget that along with being a student comes needing the firsthand experience. For example, I had a preceptor who hates Nimbex, but he never told me that he didn't like it until I used it four or five times and had bad experiences with it. He allowed me to use it in the cases that I wanted, so that I could develop my own opinion about its usefulness, which was great. It is a lot easier to defend your rationale to someone when you say "I didn't want to use XYZ drug because I have found that it is not as effective" as opposed to "I don't use Nimbex because no one I learned from ever used it." I truly believe that our preceptors need to give us just enough rope to almost hang ourselves with...experience is the best teacher.

Must Read Topics


close