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CCRI Acceptance?

Braga92 Braga92 (New) New

Hi everyone. Im 19 years old, leaving for Basic Training in the Army in 3 weeks and come back in October. I want to get my Associates in Nursing at CCRI but ive heard that the acceptance to the program has changed? That its no longer a 'first come, first serve' sort of thing where as it is now a 'whoever has the best grades, gets in first', atleast that is what i was told. I didnt do very well in High school. I took College Preparatory classes, but i would get Cs, and maybe 1-2 B-'s. I didnt really care too much about High School but now i realize how important getting good grades were. Anyway, Is CCRI like that? Im just afraid of being on the waiting list forever and finishing my pre-reqs and waiting even longer to be accepted into the actual nursing program. Thank you guys!

mgalano

Specializes in LDRP.

Hi, I am at the end of my first semester in the nursing program at CCRI. They no longer do the "wait list". If you don't get in when you apply during that semester you must apply again during the next application period. It isn't necassarily the best grades get in. I got in on my first try with a 3.2 GPA and others that applied the same app period I did with a higher GPA didn't get in. I am unsure of their exact system that they use to accept or deny people. You must have all of your pre reqs done before even applying, which is 3 semesters worth of classes. Your highschool grades do not matter. The pre reqs classes has a minumum grade of either B- or C for microbiology, if you do not recieve that they you have to retake the course.

You should just get started on your pre reqs as soon as possible because you can only apply AFTER they are all done. Hope all of this helps.

-Michelle

Hi, I am at the end of my first semester in the nursing program at CCRI. They no longer do the "wait list". If you don't get in when you apply during that semester you must apply again during the next application period. It isn't necassarily the best grades get in. I got in on my first try with a 3.2 GPA and others that applied the same app period I did with a higher GPA didn't get in. I am unsure of their exact system that they use to accept or deny people. You must have all of your pre reqs done before even applying, which is 3 semesters worth of classes. Your highschool grades do not matter. The pre reqs classes has a minumum grade of either B- or C for microbiology, if you do not recieve that they you have to retake the course.

You should just get started on your pre reqs as soon as possible because you can only apply AFTER they are all done. Hope all of this helps.

-Michelle

So in total to get an Associates in Nursing from CCRI, itll take 3 and a half years ? If i was thinking of advancement in the healthcare field, should i just go for the BA since its another semester worth?

mgalano

Specializes in LDRP.

What most of the people I know do is take all the classes that they can at CCRI to save money and then transfer those credits to like RIC or URI and start their nursing program. I went with CCRI because it is overall cheaper, has better NCLEX pass rate than both URI and RIC. When I graduate from CCRI it is only 2 semesters at RIC to get my BSN. So overall it will be cheaper and I have more odds on passing the NCLEX.

What most of the people I know do is take all the classes that they can at CCRI to save money and then transfer those credits to like RIC or URI and start their nursing program. I went with CCRI because it is overall cheaper, has better NCLEX pass rate than both URI and RIC. When I graduate from CCRI it is only 2 semesters at RIC to get my BSN. So overall it will be cheaper and I have more odds on passing the NCLEX.

Oh wow. Cool! I think thats the best idea. Thank you! :)

melissaplexy

Specializes in OB/GYN, Oncology, Hospice.

I went to CCRI first and transferred to RIC and it is a great way to save money. As far as their NCLEX pass rates, RIC has had the highest pass rate since 2007 according to http://www.health.ri.gov/data/2008-2010NursingExamPassRates.pdf. The ability to get into CCRI's program is not just based on classes and GPA. I know this because I was on the waiting list at CCRI when they changed their rules and applied with a GPA of 3.98 with all prerequisite nursing classes finished and was turned down the first semester. I found out through the grapevine that student that work for Caremark were put before students that had been waiting with higher GPA's because of an acceptance of a grant by the school. They don't want the students to know this though. I transferred to RIC as soon as I found out and took the 2 chemistry classes that were required (not required at URI) over the summer. I couldn't apply to the nursing program until that Jan. because of the deadline and RIC wants you to take a full semester there to prove you can handle their classes. So I enrolled in 16 credits (in gen ed's for the BSN) that Fall and received straight A's in everything and was accepted into the program on the first attempt. Other people get rejected because of lower GPA's and RIC gives a total of two attempts but I hear that it is like this everywhere. There are lines to get into programs and not available jobs when you graduate unless you shine as a student and choose the right area to specialities in your preceptorship. At least RIC offers a preceptorship in your senior year so you have that edge. So, save money until you are ready to transfer and then get the best grades you can. In RI you have to be working on a BSN by law and companies seem to be hiring BSN's over associate degrees - so get it done anyway. As far as preparing for your NCLEX, RIC grads say they have no problem passing because of all the ATI and Hesi mandatory testing at RIC. I graduate this week from RIC's BSN program and have benefited from the testing and greater emphasis on research. Good Luck in whatever you choose!!

I went to CCRI first and transferred to RIC and it is a great way to save money. As far as their NCLEX pass rates, RIC has had the highest pass rate since 2007 according to http://www.health.ri.gov/data/2008-2010NursingExamPassRates.pdf. The ability to get into CCRI's program is not just based on classes and GPA. I know this because I was on the waiting list at CCRI when they changed their rules and applied with a GPA of 3.98 with all prerequisite nursing classes finished and was turned down the first semester. I found out through the grapevine that student that work for Caremark were put before students that had been waiting with higher GPA's because of an acceptance of a grant by the school. They don't want the students to know this though. I transferred to RIC as soon as I found out and took the 2 chemistry classes that were required (not required at URI) over the summer. I couldn't apply to the nursing program until that Jan. because of the deadline and RIC wants you to take a full semester there to prove you can handle their classes. So I enrolled in 16 credits (in gen ed's for the BSN) that Fall and received straight A's in everything and was accepted into the program on the first attempt. Other people get rejected because of lower GPA's and RIC gives a total of two attempts but I hear that it is like this everywhere. There are lines to get into programs and not available jobs when you graduate unless you shine as a student and choose the right area to specialities in your preceptorship. At least RIC offers a preceptorship in your senior year so you have that edge. So, save money until you are ready to transfer and then get the best grades you can. In RI you have to be working on a BSN by law and companies seem to be hiring BSN's over associate degrees - so get it done anyway. As far as preparing for your NCLEX, RIC grads say they have no problem passing because of all the ATI and Hesi mandatory testing at RIC. I graduate this week from RIC's BSN program and have benefited from the testing and greater emphasis on research. Good Luck in whatever you choose!!

So what do you think i should do? Get all of my prereqs done at CCRI and then just apply or RIC and go for the BSN? is Caremark CVS? Really i dont want to be waiting forever just to get accepted into the nursing program. What would be the best route? Im getting 31k total from the Army to go to college, so money to me isnt an issue unless i have a huge chunk i have to pay from exhausting that 31k.

mgalano

Specializes in LDRP.

That website is not up to date.

I agree that something is up with the way they accept people into CCRI, I guess I was just lucky and got accepted in on my first try. I don't work for caremark or anything.

melissaplexy

Specializes in OB/GYN, Oncology, Hospice.

Try this site if you don't like the other. http://www.bestnursingdegree.com/programs/bachelors-in-nursing/. Same results.

CCRI has a sister "college compact" with RIC so you can take your general education credits and pre-req's for nursing and transfer them. CCRI has many summer classes so you could get those gen ed's out of the way and take your pre-req's during the regular school year so you'll retain the information better. Spend less money and transfer when the time is right for you. You can't apply for either nursing program until the pre-req's are done anyway. If you think you would be happier on campus and want to stay in a dorm then move into RIC from the beginning and get the full college experience. :)

Try this site if you don't like the other. http://www.bestnursingdegree.com/programs/bachelors-in-nursing/. Same results.

CCRI has a sister "college compact" with RIC so you can take your general education credits and pre-req's for nursing and transfer them. CCRI has many summer classes so you could get those gen ed's out of the way and take your pre-req's during the regular school year so you'll retain the information better. Spend less money and transfer when the time is right for you. You can't apply for either nursing program until the pre-req's are done anyway. If you think you would be happier on campus and want to stay in a dorm then move into RIC from the beginning and get the full college experience. :)

Well the only thing is, is my fear of being declined into the program and waiting 2 years untill I get in. Waiting that long, i couldve just went to RIC instead, you know? =\

melissaplexy

Specializes in OB/GYN, Oncology, Hospice.

I went back and read your first post. If you want to do well, go to CCRI and save money to start off and then transfer to get the benefits of the RIC nursing program. CCRI is better at assisting students that have been out of school for awhile or need help developing better study habits. They have greater resourses for new students. Don't kid yourself that these sciences are going to be a "cake walk" no matter where you go but if you need some help at first then it's good to have it in place. Transfer after your pre-req's are done and your feet are on the ground. Just do well at RIC after you transfer and apply to the nursing department when the next application can be submitted.

I went back and read your first post. If you want to do well, go to CCRI and save money to start off and then transfer to get the benefits of the RIC nursing program. CCRI is better at assisting students that have been out of school for awhile or need help developing better study habits. They have greater resourses for new students. Don't kid yourself that these sciences are going to be a "cake walk" no matter where you go but if you need some help at first then it's good to have it in place. Transfer after your pre-req's are done and your feet are on the ground. Just do well at RIC after you transfer and apply to the nursing department when the next application can be submitted.

Thanks Melissa. I appreciate all your help!

Melissa- I just finished the program at CCRI and they announced to us during class that the most recent data the school recently received has CCRI leading in the NCLEX pass rates. It was released to the school and is not yet published. As for the second link you published, it doesn't include 2 year programs.

mgalano

Specializes in LDRP.

I'm with frogs. The newest pass rates aren't published yet, but our school has recieved them stating ccri is leading. Not that it even matters I was just saying that if you don't have a way to choose a program then go by the pass rates.

Hi all ! Congrats to everyone accepted! I have a curious question for any students that have started the program or finished. Is there a difference in clinical locations based on what campus you are accepted?

I understand that each semester progresses to a different level so for example it would make sense to have all students do clinicals at Hasbro while learning pediatric.. But just generally speaking if you live in Newport are accepted to the Newport campus, would you do clinicals at Newport hospital? If you are in Warwick at the Warwick campus would you do clinicals at Kent?

I have been accepted to Warwick this fall and I live in Bristol.. I have actually been flexible enough to consider moving to Warwick or surrounding areas in order to make life a bit simpler as Bristol is at min 30 min commute.. I have a 4 yr old that needs to change preschools due to his current one not being open early enough for me to consider commuting from Bristol and make it anywhere on time..

At the same time searching for rentals has become a thorn in my side, perhaps I am picky, but there seems to be soo many dumpy outdated attic type apartments for outrageous prices,even in places like pawtucket, CF, woonyville (not a fan) and then if I do find something, as a parent, I have to do a bunch of sex offender/criminal checks for that area and I wonder if it best to take my chances and re apply to Newport for Jan.. or possibly Lincoln if I am better suited to find affordable rentals in that area (johnston/smithfield.. ) ... Just looking for some insight on those already in what are they saying about clinicals is there a major difference between campuses? and any insight on rentals too :uhoh3:

KellBell11 - Did you apply this month - the June application period? I did. I ran into a classmate a few days ago who said that she called to check on her application and was told that she did not get in. I drove down to the Knight Campus where I applied and checked on my application. I was told that they don't make decisions until July. I don't know why this classmate would have lied to me. She seemed like a fairly nice person. I checked with three different individuals about this and they all gave me the same answer. They don't decide until July and this student could not have found out this early. It's maddening!

Any thoughts anyone?

With regards to your situation, the first open application for the upcoming fall is held in Feb. The bulk of students who apply then are accepted (number wise). If there are still seats available then they will open another month up, which this time was June. And yes it takes a month. I found out late March I was accepted as I appled in Feb. Then in August the first open application for Spring start (Newport/Lincoln) is held and if seats are still available they hold another in October.

Thank you for the information. I'll sit tight and keep it in perspective.

mgalano

Specializes in LDRP.

kellbell- The first semester they base your clinical location on where you live (they try to) all other semester are at different hospitals. You don't go to one hospital more than once.

Me and my husband own a house in Woonsocket and I go to the Lincoln campus, My first semester I got St. Antiones as a nursing home in North Smithfield and Landmark Medical Center in Woonsocket for a hospital. It was great having both places 5 minutes from my house but next semester I could get Kent, RI hospital etc. They arent releasing where I will be until 1 week before classes start. Which is kind of tough because I need to let daycare know which days my daughter will be attending.

I have been considering a number of options. First of all, I will once again apply for the Flanagan campus day nursing program in August. I was also considering taking the two prerequisite courses which I need to apply to the respiratory therapy program. They are College Algebra and Chemistry. I don't know if it's worth it to do this, in case I am accepted this time around to the nursing program at which time I would not need these courses.

Any thoughts anyone?

Maybe I should just give up totally if I get rejected once again in the August period and just find jobs playing my violin. I played at a wedding today.

oh well

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