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Career Advice from Nurse Educators

Educators   (1,614 Views 10 Comments)
by jlrm50 jlrm50 (Member) Member

jlrm50 has 18 years experience .

958 Profile Views; 89 Posts

I have been putting off posting for awhile now because I know that sometimes responses can be rough to take.  Here it goes anyway.....

I have been an RN for 16 years in pediatrics.  My interest has always been in education and I have aspired to become an instructor for several years.  I was just accepted into an MSN program for Nurse Educator and am now questioning if I should attend.  Due to my family situation ( I have a medically complex child with Down Syndrome), I need to weigh my return on investment in completing my MSN.  My program is in-state so it will cost between $10,000 to $15,000.  Once completed I would only be able to work part-time.  At the age of 47, is this a smart move?  I know that the love of the job is more important than the income potential.  In our family situation it has to make financial sense before we make a jump.  What I am looking for is a list of pros and cons to help me make my decision.  I do have to find my own mentor locally which is a looming dread since I live in a rural area.  Time commitment and lack of family time is also on my con list.  Also on the con list is the potential lack of return on investment.  I am seeing that online instructors may only make $1500 per semester, per class.  The pro list is that I have a new career path to follow if I cannot continue in my current position.  I am also looking at it as income potential in retirement.  Any thoughts?        

 

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knittygrittyRN has 6 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, OB/GYN, Informatics, Simulation.

104 Posts; 3,716 Profile Views

I'm finishing my graduate degree this year, I can say it has opened more opportunities for myself but I agree that you'll have to examine your own needs.

I worked in informatics and now simulation education because of my degree both of which are higher paying then a university would be. You might want to consider jobs that might be open to you as well instead of a 'traditional' nurse educator position.

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Nurse SMS has 8 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development.

4 Followers; 6,043 Posts; 47,875 Profile Views

Most online schools want a degree higher than an MSN, so there is a chance you won't be able to secure one of those jobs without going higher still. Working in professional development at a pediatric hospital will open more doors to you as well as generally pay much better. However, often those jobs are only full time, though at my facility we do have some who are PRN and work a couple of shifts a week.

The ROI is a question only you can answer. How will you feel down the line if you never do this? I personally have more than gotten my money's worth in terms of pay, opportunities, reduced stress and increased job satisfaction. But I work full time. We are, however, the same age.

I hope answers become clearer to you and you have peace with your decision. I am wishing you well!

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PediatricRNTX specializes in Pediatrics.

121 Posts; 4,406 Profile Views

yes, be informed. Most if not all online instructor jobs want a PHd. I recently posted about online instructor jobs (teaching assistant, academic coach) whatever you want to call them requiring a master degree and making very low hourly pay. The degree is valuable and opens doors, but it also depends what you want to do with it. 

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everchangingRN has 20 years experience as a ASN, BSN, MSN and specializes in All.

26 Posts; 1,309 Profile Views

PediatricRNTX

Can you tell me where you posted that? I would like to read it. 

Thanks

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jlrm50 has 18 years experience.

89 Posts; 958 Profile Views

On 2/12/2019 at 2:56 PM, knittygrittyRN said:

I'm finishing my graduate degree this year, I can say it has opened more opportunities for myself but I agree that you'll have to examine your own needs.

I worked in informatics and now simulation education because of my degree both of which are higher paying then a university would be. You might want to consider jobs that might be open to you as well instead of a 'traditional' nurse educator position.

That is something I have been researching, the "nontraditional" nursing roles.  I am planning for retirement and what opportunities having an MSN will afford me as far as part-time work when I retire.  Thank you for your input.  

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jlrm50 has 18 years experience.

89 Posts; 958 Profile Views

On 2/13/2019 at 1:00 PM, not.done.yet said:

Most online schools want a degree higher than an MSN, so there is a chance you won't be able to secure one of those jobs without going higher still. Working in professional development at a pediatric hospital will open more doors to you as well as generally pay much better. However, often those jobs are only full time, though at my facility we do have some who are PRN and work a couple of shifts a week.

The ROI is a question only you can answer. How will you feel down the line if you never do this? I personally have more than gotten my money's worth in terms of pay, opportunities, reduced stress and increased job satisfaction. But I work full time. We are, however, the same age.

I hope answers become clearer to you and you have peace with your decision. I am wishing you well!

Many schools in my area with actually take my BSN but "prefer" an MSN.  Still struggling with this decision. I am hoping to honestly be able to retire in a few years and, perhaps, never even need to use my MSN but I feel I need a safety net since I will always have to care for my son.  

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jlrm50 has 18 years experience.

89 Posts; 958 Profile Views

On 2/13/2019 at 1:07 PM, PediatricRNTX said:

yes, be informed. Most if not all online instructor jobs want a PHd. I recently posted about online instructor jobs (teaching assistant, academic coach) whatever you want to call them requiring a master degree and making very low hourly pay. The degree is valuable and opens doors, but it also depends what you want to do with it. 

Thank you for bringing this to my attention.  As I look closer at jobs for online instructors I am noticing different verbage that may mean the post is for an assistant and not the actual instructor.  

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PediatricRNTX specializes in Pediatrics.

121 Posts; 4,406 Profile Views

also nurse "mentors" that are essentially responsible for passing and progression through the online programs. I hear its about 65K but no challenge and stuck on the phone all day. Hardly what I envisioned as an online instructor. Just sharing 

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jlrm50 has 18 years experience.

89 Posts; 958 Profile Views

All the "titles" are so confusing!!!!

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