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Can UK midwives get licensed in the US?

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by lauritasol lauritasol (Member)

lauritasol has 4 years experience and specializes in L&D, Research, Midwifery Student.

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Hi...

I am interested in becoming a midwife and am currently applying to the NMC to be registered as a RN in the UK. I was looking at going to Frontier in the US, but have heard from others here that the UK has the best midwives in the world.

My questions are:

  • How hard would it be to get into a UK midwifery program?
  • Can a UK trained midwife become licensed to practice in the US?
  • Not sure if anyone will know this, but if it is not possible to go to school in the UK, do you know if a UK midwife would be able/willing to precept me for Frontier?

Okay, I think that is it for now. TIA!!!

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Silverdragon102 has 30 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Medical and general practice now LTC.

6 Followers; 1 Article; 38,778 Posts; 142,508 Profile Views

Hi...

I am interested in becoming a midwife and am currently applying to the NMC to be registered as a RN in the UK. I was looking at going to Frontier in the US, but have heard from others here that the UK has the best midwives in the world.

My questions are:

  • How hard would it be to get into a UK midwifery program?
  • Can a UK trained midwife become licensed to practice in the US?
  • Not sure if anyone will know this, but if it is not possible to go to school in the UK, do you know if a UK midwife would be able/willing to precept me for Frontier?

Okay, I think that is it for now. TIA!!!

To get on the UK midwifery course it would be better to approach the course director in the area you ar planning on living as each will have their own requirements, but you will find you will be classed as an international student and the fees will be high. To be licensed in the US then I should image that will depend on the BON requirements. Regarding precept I would think it would be a bit hard if in the US and they are in the UK but I am sure someone would be willing to buddy you and help you

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RGN1 specializes in med/surg.

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All of the above - except to add that there's a shortage of midwives due to an increased birth rate here - so you may find you're in demand. However, it will cost you as SD said!

Midwives here have a huge responsibility - often the doctor has no part in the birth - they are only called if things start to go wrong.

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lisamct specializes in learning disabilities/midwifery.

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Thought you might like info from an existing UK student midwives perspective.

Places for applicants on midwifery courses are being cut at almost all universities at the moment. Mine has gone from 26 a year when I started in 2005 to a predicted 18 this year. Saying that, someone has to get the available places so this is some basic info on what unis are looking for;

>Evidence of recent study - basically they want to know your able to study to an acceptable level

>Evidence of 'care/people' experience - this can be anything from previous nursing experience to volunteering at a youth group to childminding

>Basic entry qualifications usually arent specific but they look for them to include qualifications in english and a science subject

As an international student you'll be required to pay tuition fees (UK midwifery/nursing students are exempt from paying these) and may not be eligible for a bursary or student loans. I think you need to be a UK resident for 3 years before you become entitled to free tuition etc.

There is a midwife shortage at present but there is also a shortage of posts for newly qualified midwives. Sounds bizarre I know but a lot of trusts have job freezes on at present so although they are short they cant advertise any positions. Many students are qualifying up and down the country and going back to their previous jobs as they cant find midwifery work. London and the SE of England do still have some vacancies but even these are growing sparse. However, there is an ageing population of midwives in the UK with an estimated 30-40% due to retire in the next few years so thing may be changing for the better.

As for a UK midwife getting registered in the US i'm really not sure. I had a discussion a few months ago with a midwife looking to relocate to the US and I think some states are now recognising our direct entry midwifery qualification so Im sure it is possible but it might be worth checking out where you would want to ultimately work to see whats happening in that state.

But, its not all doom and gloom. I love being a (student) midwife. I love having the oppportunity to be with women and their families throughout the whole pregnancy and birth continium and I'm really enjoying my time at university.

As RGN1 says midwives have a lot more responsibility here than OB nurses in the US (not sure US midwives) We are often the only health professional a woman will met throughout her pregnancy, birth and post partum period. The responsibility is huge and with only a year to go and 17 moree babies to catch before I qualify I dont know if I'll ever know enough to take it all on!

Hope that helps a bit, if you need any more info just ask.

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madwife2002 has 26 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in RN, BSN, CHDN.

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I think you may find as Germany is an EU country that you would not pay fee's. I knew some Spanish nurses who trained as midwives with me, and they got paid a wage.

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lauritasol has 4 years experience and specializes in L&D, Research, Midwifery Student.

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Thank you all for your replies! You have helped me so much.

About my situation - currently I live in Germany with my husband who flies for the US Air Force. However, I cannot find work as a Registered Nurse here because I do not speak German or Dutch for the Netherlands. So, I am currently applying for my license in the UK. I take the English test on the 7th of July and then plan to come to England for the 20 day test.

Unfortunately, I am a labor and delivery nurse in the United States and the travel nurse company explained that there are no labor and delivery nurses that work in the UK since midwives do all the deliveries and there are no doctors. So, this is true? I wonder who assists the midwives? In the US, I work with both doctors and midwives - I assist them both with high risk and low risk deliveries with the doctors and low risk/natural births with the midwives.

I started midwifery school in the States for 1 semester, but had to stop when my husband got transferred this past May. I'm hoping that I can not only find a RN position in the UK, but that I can also continue to pursue and finish my midwifery course. I have a great passion for women's health and the entire partum/natal experience. I really want to finish my midwifery studies, especially if I can no longer work in the UK as a labor & delivery nurse. However, I do not want to complete a midwifery program in the UK and then find that my degree was for naught when they won't allow me to practice in the US.

Thanks again for everything!

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Silverdragon102 has 30 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Medical and general practice now LTC.

6 Followers; 1 Article; 38,778 Posts; 142,508 Profile Views

Thank you all for your replies! You have helped me so much.

About my situation - currently I live in Germany with my husband who flies for the US Air Force. However, I cannot find work as a Registered Nurse here because I do not speak German or Dutch for the Netherlands. So, I am currently applying for my license in the UK. I take the English test on the 7th of July and then plan to come to England for the 20 day test.

Unfortunately, I am a labor and delivery nurse in the United States and the travel nurse company explained that there are no labor and delivery nurses that work in the UK since midwives do all the deliveries and there are no doctors. So, this is true? I wonder who assists the midwives? In the US, I work with both doctors and midwives - I assist them both with high risk and low risk deliveries with the doctors and low risk/natural births with the midwives.

I started midwifery school in the States for 1 semester, but had to stop when my husband got transferred this past May. I'm hoping that I can not only find a RN position in the UK, but that I can also continue to pursue and finish my midwifery course. I have a great passion for women's health and the entire partum/natal experience. I really want to finish my midwifery studies, especially if I can no longer work in the UK as a labor & delivery nurse. However, I do not want to complete a midwifery program in the UK and then find that my degree was for naught when they won't allow me to practice in the US.

Thanks again for everything!

Majority of deliveries in the UK are delivered by the midwife including all care both pre and post delivery doctors only really come into the situation if there are any difficulties. They are practitioners in their own rights

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madwife2002 has 26 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in RN, BSN, CHDN.

1 Follower; 74 Articles; 4,777 Posts; 120,423 Profile Views

Thank you all for your replies! You have helped me so much.

About my situation - currently I live in Germany with my husband who flies for the US Air Force. However, I cannot find work as a Registered Nurse here because I do not speak German or Dutch for the Netherlands. So, I am currently applying for my license in the UK. I take the English test on the 7th of July and then plan to come to England for the 20 day test.

Unfortunately, I am a labor and delivery nurse in the United States and the travel nurse company explained that there are no labor and delivery nurses that work in the UK since midwives do all the deliveries and there are no doctors. So, this is true? I wonder who assists the midwives? In the US, I work with both doctors and midwives - I assist them both with high risk and low risk deliveries with the doctors and low risk/natural births with the midwives.

I started midwifery school in the States for 1 semester, but had to stop when my husband got transferred this past May. I'm hoping that I can not only find a RN position in the UK, but that I can also continue to pursue and finish my midwifery course. I have a great passion for women's health and the entire partum/natal experience. I really want to finish my midwifery studies, especially if I can no longer work in the UK as a labor & delivery nurse. However, I do not want to complete a midwifery program in the UK and then find that my degree was for naught when they won't allow me to practice in the US.

Thanks again for everything![/quote)

Most times for Normal birth there is usually only the midwife, the woman and the partner in the room for the delivery, another midwife is normally close at hand should anything go wrong but in reality they are are not needed most of the time.

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@lauritasol:

I know it's been a quite some years since you posted that question about UK midwives getting licensed in the US, but I had a very important question somewhat regarding that: I'm planning on going into travel nursing and I plan on going to the UK, but I was worried about the talk of positions being sparse! =( Are they still that way, or has it changed from then to now? Also, what midwifery school was it that you took one semester in the US? I'm trying to find a good one to get into here in the US-unless it would be more beneficial taking one in the UK...? Please let me know! thank you =)

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