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BP machine Cuff

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Im sure we've all seen blood pressure cuffs (on the automated machines) that stay inflated partially. I've always removed the connecting tube and squeezed out the air when that happened, to get an accurate reading.

But I had the thought that the machine detects pressure and a partially inflated cuff will not affect accuracy, it will just inflate faster since it starts out at some pressure (not zero/no air inside the cuff).

Anyone have any ideas? Best practices? Should I bother letting the air out?

P.S. Best practice for alcohol swabbing skin is to start at injection site and swirl outward in a spiral? Just confirming.

Thanks

-New RN

MunoRN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care.

Im sure we've all seen blood pressure cuffs (on the automated machines) that stay inflated partially. I've always removed the connecting tube and squeezed out the air when that happened, to get an accurate reading.

But I had the thought that the machine detects pressure and a partially inflated cuff will not affect accuracy, it will just inflate faster since it starts out at some pressure (not zero/no air inside the cuff).

Anyone have any ideas? Best practices? Should I bother letting the air out?

P.S. Best practice for alcohol swabbing skin is to start at injection site and swirl outward in a spiral? Just confirming.

Thanks

-New RN

Automated BP machines measure the total pressure in the cuff to determine the pressure it exerting on the artery, there's no need to ensure the cuff is completely empty of air before it takes a reading. If you've left it off the patient when it goes off then you usually will need to disconnect it and squeeze at least some of the air out to place it properly on the patient.

Thank you very much. I feel better now. Much appreciated

Im sure we've all seen blood pressure cuffs (on the automated machines) that stay inflated partially. I've always removed the connecting tube and squeezed out the air when that happened, to get an accurate reading.

But I had the thought that the machine detects pressure and a partially inflated cuff will not affect accuracy, it will just inflate faster since it starts out at some pressure (not zero/no air inside the cuff).

Anyone have any ideas? Best practices? Should I bother letting the air out?

P.S. Best practice for alcohol swabbing skin is to start at injection site and swirl outward in a spiral? Just confirming.

Thanks

-New RN

I thought current practice for alcohol swabs didn't involve the swirling, just use good friction in an up

And down motion.

Best place to find answer is what the manufacturer's manual say on the BP machine. As for the alcohol swab, it is different in every place, so best to look up what your own policy says.

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