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Best Path to Midwifery...

Pre-Nursing   (1,047 Views | 8 Replies)
by rumbamom rumbamom (New) New

330 Profile Views; 4 Posts

Hello,

I am currently in a PhD program in Political Science and am strongly considering switching my path to something more practical, such as midwifery. I am motivated by this because first, I feel the more I read, the more I think that people with Political Science/Social Science backgrounds should be in fields where they are more hands-on with people. Next, I would like a stronger job outlook when I am finished with school. Finally, I would really like to work with women and help women, directly, especially women in at-risk situations.

My questions are as follows: First, I have the chance to obtain a Masters in Public Health with a concentration in Public Health Education. I would obtain this in a year and apply to RN/Midwifery programs at the same time. Is this a good idea? My other option would be to take preequisite classes for an RN (anatomy/physiology and others) and simultaneously apply to a program that offers the RN to midwifery option. What is the best plan? Who should I be asking these questions to? Any advice is greatly appreciated!

Thanks!!!

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RunBabyRN has 2 years experience and specializes in L&D, infusion, urology.

3,677 Posts; 26,917 Profile Views

I'm not sure you're quite clear on how the path to midwifery works, but I think that's the point of your post. :)

In order to be eligible to apply for a CNM program, you must have your BSN and be a licensed RN. Few CNM programs will accept new grads- they generally want to see a few years of working, ideally in obstetrics.

I assume since you're working on your PhD, you have a bachelor's? You can do an accelerated bachelor's program, or aBSN, or you can do a traditional BSN. Some traditional programs are going to 2 years (instead of 3), so you don't always have to shell out the cash for an accelerated program, just do your homework.

From there, you need to work as a RN. Once you have a few years under your belt, apply to your midwifery program(s). Have you looked at any programs to see their requirements? For example, I'm looking to apply to UCSF's CNM program after I work for a bit (I just got licensed), and this is a link to their requirements: Masters Program Admission Requirements | UCSF School of Nursing With their requirements, you'd be able to do an ADN program, since you already have a bachelor's in another field. Not every school is like this, and every school's requirements will vary some.

Do some research on schools in your area, and make sure you're spending your time and money on the stuff you actually need.

Also, a friendly heads up, if your screen name is your real name, you may want to change it. There are a lot of reasons to protect your identity on a public forum, especially once you're a nurse.

Good luck!

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4 Posts; 330 Profile Views

Hi,

Thank you so much for the information and advice regarding my name! Yes, I was curious as to the different/best paths to the degree. I do have a bachelor's and a masters - both from social science, and I had read of different programs that in fact admitted students that do not have a BSN - with the understanding that you would obtain this while studying. I am going to continue to keep reading! Thanks again. First time on a forum :)

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HouTx has 35 years experience as a BSN, MSN, EdD and specializes in Critical Care, Education.

9,051 Posts; 45,280 Profile Views

PP has offered a wonderful overview of the process & requirements for becoming a CNM.

Just wanted to add a caveat. If you obtain an ADN as your entry into nursing, you may not be able to obtain an acute care (hospital) job. In most major urban areas, hospitals are only hiring BSNs - and this practice is rapidly disseminating to all areas of the US for number of reasons... you can find lots of background info here on AN.

Be sure to investigate the employment situation in your area. You may need that BSN to obtain a job in L&D to get the experience required for admission to CNM programs.

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8 Posts; 545 Profile Views

I'm not sure where you live but Ohio State University has a graduate entry program for midwifery. It's a master's program (ofc) specifically for individuals without a BSN. You don't even need to be an RN, just STNA/CNA.

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sadiemae1123 has 16 years experience.

214 Posts; 3,287 Profile Views

You might consider posting in the CNM forum for advice on how to proceed. If you've never worked in an acute healthcare environment you might seek out a CNM to shadow to get a feel for what the work really involves before you make any big career changes.

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4 Posts; 330 Profile Views

Hi! I actually do not live near Ohio, but there are programs close to where I currently live. Perhaps a BSN would be an appropriate first step as I could perhaps work while obtaining my BSN and CNM. Thank you!

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4 Posts; 330 Profile Views

I think I am going to post in the CNM as well and definitely shadow both a doula and a CNM before making any big decisions! Thank you for the good advice

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2 Followers; 14,620 Posts; 104,688 Profile Views

There ae a bunch of so-called "direct-entry" MSN programs with a midwifery concentration that take people with (at least) a BA/BS in some other discipline, bit no nursing education or experience, all over the US (not just one program in OH). These programs are, basically, an accelerated BSN and an MSN program mashed together, and you graduate with an RN license and prepared to write the CNM exam and start practicing as a CNM.

While you may want to take an MPH for your own, personal satisfaction and it would certainly enhance your nursing practice going forward, it will not help you become a midwife.

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