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Becoming an FNP through the military

Posted

Specializes in Pediatric Emergency. Has 5 years experience.

I've been reading as many of these threads as possible but non of them answer the question of how the military sends active duty personnel through FNP school. Another thread said that you have to be in for about 4 years before they consider you. is this true? are there any RN's that came in active duty and then had them (the military) send you the NP school? I've found information about the CRNA programs but nothing else.

I'm considering joining the army, but if AF, Navy, or PHS has something better to offer (ie: huge bonus, guarantee NP school, etc...) I'll definitely get on board. I haven't talked to any AMEDD recruiters since I'm in my 1st semester of nursing school. 3 more to go!!

I'm a prior service army medic that serviced 4 years and some change. When i get back in I'm expecting O-1E pay w/ 4 years, which is more pay than what a BSN would make straight out of school (at least in DC). I've heard of people saying just go through FNP school yourself and then join up after... I would I was single w/ no kids, but now I'm a father and have bills to pay, I'd rather get paid as an O-something + BAH + BAS + cola than starving wife and kid.

1. Does anyone know where I can find information on how to become an FNP through the military?

2. Has anyone gone in as an RN and have the military send you to FNP school? Plz share your experience~!

3. What should I do to stand out to get selected for FNP school?

- i heard letters of recommendations are very important

- graduate w/ GPA 3.0 or higher

- GRE needed? if so, what's an acceptable score?

4. What are your obligations after you graduate?

carolinapooh, BSN, RN

Has 10 years experience.

The military will pay for you to get your NP regardless through tuition assistance, which is not competitive and is guaranteed. What you're referencing is programs like through the Air Force's AFIT or at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, which is a fully accredited university run by the DoD to train military health care providers. Entry to both each services' funded NP programs (by funded I mean they pay your tuition and essentially give you orders to your school, your school becomes your duty station and your job becomes going to class for X amount of time) and the USUHS is competitive, and each service has different rules for acceptance to their specific programs.

I know a little bit about this but the expert here for the AF is really wtbcrna, who's done it. I know in the AF (and I know this because I just had my career planning session with my chief nurse) you have to be on station two years by the time you would start classes when you're using the AFIT funded programs, but that if you're within a few months they generally waive it (I'll be three months shy of the two year mark by the time I want to apply but she's said don't sweat it if I'm accepted).

chul_soo

Specializes in Pediatric Emergency. Has 5 years experience.

Do i choose which school I want to get in to and apply for AFIT or Does the AF have their own school they send you to?

BrownBoiRN, BSN, MSN, DNP, APN

Specializes in Primary Care, FNP, AGACNP, Palliative Care. Has 13 years experience.

You can use your TA which is guaranteed and go to school part-time either traditional in class or online. You can do your clinical's on your days off at your military hospital. By the time your initial contract is up you could be either finished or have almost finished your Master's as a Nurse Practitioner. Most part-time programs are 3 or 4 years which is the length of your first contract. This is my own personal plan. I am going to be stationed at Fort Bragg and will attend Duke's online program and complete my clinical's on my days off at Womack.

chul_soo

Specializes in Pediatric Emergency. Has 5 years experience.

when i graduate from FNP school, does my MOS change to 66P automatically?

wtbcrna, MSN, DNP, CRNA

Specializes in Anesthesia.

You can use your TA which is guaranteed and go to school part-time either traditional in class or online. You can do your clinical's on your days off at your military hospital. By the time your initial contract is up you could be either finished or have almost finished your Master's as a Nurse Practitioner. Most part-time programs are 3 or 4 years which is the length of your first contract. This is my own personal plan. I am going to be stationed at Fort Bragg and will attend Duke's online program and complete my clinical's on my days off at Womack.

Do you plan on getting out after your initial obligation, because usually you incur a two year obligation after the last class day of your last class.?

BrownBoiRN, BSN, MSN, DNP, APN

Specializes in Primary Care, FNP, AGACNP, Palliative Care. Has 13 years experience.

Nope. I plan on doing 20+ and retiring at 44 or 54 if I do 30 years. Hopefully I am in it for the long haul.

chul_soo

Specializes in Pediatric Emergency. Has 5 years experience.

Nope. I plan on doing 20+ and retiring at 44 or 54 if I do 30 years. Hopefully I am in it for the long haul.

how is it being an active duty? any chance in getting deployed. i have a buddy of mine in germany and he says it's volunteer based and only for 6 months at a time. how are you treated? i know the answers are different depending on duty station/ward but still just want to know.

wtbcrna, MSN, DNP, CRNA

Specializes in Anesthesia.

I've been reading as many of these threads as possible but non of them answer the question of how the military sends active duty personnel through FNP school. Another thread said that you have to be in for about 4 years before they consider you. is this true? are there any RN's that came in active duty and then had them (the military) send you the NP school? I've found information about the CRNA programs but nothing else.

I'm considering joining the army, but if AF, Navy, or PHS has something better to offer (ie: huge bonus, guarantee NP school, etc...) I'll definitely get on board. I haven't talked to any AMEDD recruiters since I'm in my 1st semester of nursing school. 3 more to go!!

I'm a prior service army medic that serviced 4 years and some change. When i get back in I'm expecting O-1E pay w/ 4 years, which is more pay than what a BSN would make straight out of school (at least in DC). I've heard of people saying just go through FNP school yourself and then join up after... I would I was single w/ no kids, but now I'm a father and have bills to pay, I'd rather get paid as an O-something + BAH + BAS + cola than starving wife and kid.

1. Does anyone know where I can find information on how to become an FNP through the military?

2. Has anyone gone in as an RN and have the military send you to FNP school? Plz share your experience~!

3. What should I do to stand out to get selected for FNP school?

- i heard letters of recommendations are very important

- graduate w/ GPA 3.0 or higher

- GRE needed? if so, what's an acceptable score?

4. What are your obligations after you graduate?

I am more familiar with the AF program, but every service (including Army) offers an FNP program for AD nurses. http://www.usuhs.mil/gsn/curriculum/fnp.html Every service is a little different in their requirements to be accepted. I think the payback is 4yrs right now, but by the time you goto FNP school it will probably be a doctoral program with increased payback d/t longer schooling.

chul_soo

Specializes in Pediatric Emergency. Has 5 years experience.

I am more familiar with the AF program, but every service (including Army) offers an FNP program for AD nurses. http://www.usuhs.mil/gsn/curriculum/fnp.html Every service is a little different in their requirements to be accepted. I think the payback is 4yrs right now, but by the time you goto FNP school it will probably be a doctoral program with increased payback d/t longer schooling.

is this a rumor or fact? when i was in afghanistan, they told us we're going home next month, and the month after that, and the month after that again... i know how the military likes to say stuff and never follow through.

wtbcrna, MSN, DNP, CRNA

Specializes in Anesthesia.

is this a rumor or fact? when i was in afghanistan, they told us we're going home next month, and the month after that, and the month after that again... i know how the military likes to say stuff and never follow through.

Assuming that you are talking about the DNP...Then it is a fact. USUHS plans to start their first class of DNP students in 2013. The Army CRNA program in San Antonio plans to start theirs in 2011.

chul_soo

Specializes in Pediatric Emergency. Has 5 years experience.

kinda off topic, do DNP make more money than FNP(MSN) in the civilian section.

wtbcrna, MSN, DNP, CRNA

Specializes in Anesthesia.

kinda off topic, do DNP make more money than FNP(MSN) in the civilian section.

Nope. The only entity that makes more money off the DNP is the universities.

chul_soo

Specializes in Pediatric Emergency. Has 5 years experience.

so... if u want to be a 66P in the army starting 2013, u need ur DNP? or can you still get ur FNP yourself via MSN?

wtbcrna, MSN, DNP, CRNA

Specializes in Anesthesia.

so... if u want to be a 66P in the army starting 2013, u need ur DNP? or can you still get ur FNP yourself via MSN?

No one has mentioned making the MSN APNs go back and get their DPN or requiring your DNP if you already hold your MSN prior to 2015 for non CRNAs or 2025 for CRNAs.

Kathyporter

Specializes in L+D, ambulatory surgery, Womens Health.

No one will have to go back. If you have a MSN you will be grandfathered in, but it will be what new APNs need to be certified.

wtbcrna, MSN, DNP, CRNA

Specializes in Anesthesia.

No one will have to go back. If you have a MSN you will be grandfathered in, but it will be what new APNs need to be certified.

Not necessarily true for military APNs point in fact the military required all CRNAs to upgrade to a Masters Degree when the requirement changed from Bachelors to Masters, but so far I have not heard a definite answer for military APNs on this matter yet.

One thing for sure you don't want to have only a Masters degree when you go up for promotion when all of your peers have Doctoral degrees.

carolinapooh, BSN, RN

Has 10 years experience.

You can use your TA which is guaranteed and go to school part-time either traditional in class or online. You can do your clinical's on your days off at your military hospital. By the time your initial contract is up you could be either finished or have almost finished your Master's as a Nurse Practitioner. Most part-time programs are 3 or 4 years which is the length of your first contract. This is my own personal plan. I am going to be stationed at Fort Bragg and will attend Duke's online program and complete my clinical's on my days off at Womack.

How did you get them to pay for Duke? I'm a Duke alumni and really don't want to go anywhere else and I've been told the $60K price tag is too steep if there are equal in-state programs which are cheaper. And if you use TA, you'll owe them 2 years after the date of your last class.