Jump to content

Asperger's syndrome

Psychiatric   (1,996 Views | 8 Replies)

michelle95 specializes in Geriatrics, DD, Peri-op.

3,330 Profile Views; 329 Posts

I posted this in pediatric nursing cause I didn't realize there was a psychiatric nursing forum. Duh!

Anyway, I took my child to a psychiatrist on Tuesday and he thinks that my son may have as or ADHD. I'm reading up on AS...and really think it fits him. Not necessarily ADHD. Doc doesn't want to diagnose until he is closer to 5 (he's 4.5)

So, do you all have any suggestions/ideas/wisdom that you want to impart. I wanted to try some medication to cool his outbursts. Doc wants us to try Focalin but isn't that really for ADHD and may not help outbursts?

Thanks a bunch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

74 Posts; 2,306 Profile Views

My best friend's brother in law has aspergers. When you meet him, it is easy to assume that he has ADHD. He is intelligent and high functioning, but easily excitable. he gets onto something and will not let go of it. From what I have gathered, his social skills have vastly improved during his teenage years, though my friend says that the larger the group he is in, the more uncomfortable he is. He just graduated high school, having participated in a regular academic curriculum, not special ed. I do not know what, if any, medications he is on. I know this isn't much, but I hope it helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 Article; 2,334 Posts; 19,171 Profile Views

I posted on the thread in Pediatrics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

michelle95 specializes in Geriatrics, DD, Peri-op.

329 Posts; 3,330 Profile Views

Thanks to you all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

374 Posts; 3,013 Profile Views

Michelle,

Asperger's is a complicated condition. I think the psychiatrist is well advised to want to wait before sticking a potentially damaging lable like that on a child. I'm really not thrilled with the idea of medication to control behavior in a pre schooler. One presenter at a recent psycho-pharmacology seminar I attended presented evidence that the meds generally given for ADHD type disorders, do nothing to actually help the patient except keep his caretakers form murdering him. That is they just control the behavior without any long term improvement in learning. Mind you he went on to say that preventing the patient being abused by his parent is not a bad reason to give the med. Just be sure you know who the medication is really for. You may be medicating your child for your comfort.

Ultimately we all have to learn to live with the brain we have. Brains do not all work the same. If the medication will help you child do that then great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

239 Posts; 4,672 Profile Views

On the other hand, if he does have AS, then early intervention to help him with his social and communication skills is essential.

As far as medication is concerned, it isn't just to keep parents from abusing their difficult children. The children themselves are often very unhappy with their behavior and medication can make a huge difference in their social interactions and quality of life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

memphispanda is a RN and specializes in Med-Surg.

810 Posts; 6,995 Profile Views

Waiting isn't a great idea at ALL. The label can be changed, but any detriment to the child that occurs during the wait can't be undone. If not properly treated--whether by medication, behavior therapy, or a combination of the two--then the child will learn to cope using less than ideal methods. The child's own immature coping mechanisms don't help. These kids have to be taught how to deal with things properly, and the earlier that is started the better. (old habits are hard to break--especially for kids with developmental disabilities)

Medications often help children--not just because they aren't murdered by their parents. Heck, medications aren't the whole answer for any kid. The meds help kids deal with things. Stimulants help them focus and help them control unwanted behaviors. Antidepressants help these kids with the enormous stress they are under that is very difficult to explain to outsiders. These kids have anxiety that responds well to medication. It isn't just about making the parent feel better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 Posts; 651 Profile Views

Hi..this is my first post on this forum and your topic has hit home for me. My son who is now 13 was recently dx with aspergers syndrome. My advice to you is don't wait...the earlier the intervention the better. Label schmable. ...you need to have a concrete diagnosis so when it comes time for school you (your son) will have the right to things he will need to be successful....please do your self a favor (so you won't be regretful, as I am)...visit the Oasis site http://www.udel.edu/bkirby/asperger/aswhatisit.html

also the delphi forums (aspergers family forum)

http://www.delphiforums.com/

have a great message board the people there are very helpful and are knowledgable about plans of action and the best ways to proceed....good luck.....p.s. if this was a pediatrician that came up with the dx, i would be surprised, as most of the time they will refer you to a pediatric developmental specialist or a neurologist. (also it does not seem to be usual for medication to be prescribed right away.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

64 Posts; 2,007 Profile Views

Hello! I am a Psych nurse and have specialized in this kind of nursing for almost 20 years. My son was diagnosed with ADHD before he even started kindergarten but only because I knew the signs and he had most of them by age 4!!! If it weren't for the medication, he would have had a very hard time making it through the early years in school thus causing him to probably fail a few years. I, like you, didn't want to put my baby on meds right away but after a lot of research and working with these sort of kids, I realized that my child needed the medicine. Their little brains are moving a thousand miles a minute and this is very disturbing for them. They can't help what they do sometimes and I really feel sorry for the ones that aren't on meds or can't pay for the meds to help their condition. I am a ADHD adult and let me tell you, if I would have been treated earlier in life, things might have been a little different for me. I have never regretted NOT being on meds, but my mother has since told me that I was such a handful for her growing up. I just started STRATERRA yesterday matter in fact. This is a NON stimulant medication for ADHD. So a lot less side effects like for the Adderal, Ritalin or Dexedrine. I don't mean to go on and on about this subject, but please use your heart to decide if your child needs to be on meds or not. It certainly isn't going to hurt him if he does go on meds but if he doesn't, he will be miserable because his little brain and motor movements are going to be so fast. If you have any questions or would just like to IM me, please feel free to do so. I went through hell and back with my son and his ADHD. If I can help just one person understand what the child goes through and what the parent has to deal with, I feel that I have done good. I actually feel that my ADHD has helped me in my career and excelling in what I do as a nurse so I used my disease as a constructive disease. Always remember, love your child no matter what and please don't hesitate to do what's best for your child. That's just my opinion on this subject. Have a great evening. Cindy :balloons:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.